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By Assoicated Press | July 30, 1994
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- Classy Mirage overpowered the leaders in the stretch drive and went on to a three-length victory over Spinning Round yesterday in the $81,125 Honorable Miss Stakes for older fillies and mares at Saratoga. The winner, ridden by Julie Krone, returned $4.20, $2.80 and $2.60.
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NEWS
December 11, 2013
Has it truly gotten this sad, this pathetic? Orioles President of Baseball Operations Dan Duquette revealed the team's interest in two free agents who, according to The Sun, "have a history of performance-enhancing drug use" ( "Looking at Logan Morrison's possible fit in Baltimore, Jason Hammel and more," Dec. 10). Both pitcher Bartolo Colon and DH/outfielder Nelson Cruz have tainted histories of dabbling with PEDs or steroids. Are these the quality players whom classy Manager Buck Showalter deserves?
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NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Give HBO four stars for its classy, spicy and very satisfying documentary about the once legendary New York eatery, Le Cirque: A Table in Heaven. The filmmakers have structured it as an operatic drama with a capital D. Viewers follow the four-star French restaurant as it flourishes in the 1970s and '80s under owner Sirio Maccioni - up through its closing in 2004, and reopening two years later. Watch as the owner, his wife and three sons engage in family combat worthy of Wagner as they struggle to find a new style for a new century.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | March 12, 2013
I want to start of by saying the following: If by some miracle I ever become a WWE announcer, one that people somehow develop a care for (for some odd reason) and in some minute way shape or form using me in a storyline after I pass away would generate a desired response or would enhance a feud between two talents leading to a marquee event, then I want everyone to know that this is exactly what I would have wanted to happen. In fact, I could only hope and dream that that happens.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 1997
I DON'T THINK you're going to find the answer in that book," my sister chided. "Even Martha Stewart could not have rescued this holiday gathering."Ignoring her, I continued to leaf through Martha's latest tome."Face it, your holiday dinner failed because you were trying to be someone you're not. Linen tablecloths? China? Votive candles?" she asked.So what did she suggest? Paper plates and Hi-C drink boxes by the warm glow of a Black & Decker snake light?"I'm just saying the napkins folded into an origami depiction of 'It's a Wonderful Life' was lost on most of the guests," she noted.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | December 23, 1990
Even the names of Coach handbags are classy: the "Court Bag," the "Avenue Bag," the "Plaza Bag." They've long been associated with a certain chic, substantial elegance.But this reputation for horsy high style isn't the whole story. Amongst the peerlessly crafted spectator bags and "Madison Satchels" can be found the "Light Hobo" and the "Duffel Drawstring" -- bags that reflect in style as well as name a looser sensibility.Debbie Blank, assistant manager at the Coach Store in the Gallery, says their customers run the gamut from college-age girls searching for a duffel to throw all their stuff in to customers who return to the same, classic style year after year.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK COL BOWLING | December 27, 1992
A 228 duckpin game will still raise eyebrows in the pro league. A 228 game by a women usually sets a house record. The reason is simple. Few bowlers in their bowling careers will throw a 200-plus game. The percentage of women who do is small. It's a cause for celebration if a senior citizen approaches that mark.When a senior woman cranks out a 228 game, it's fantastic. But that's exactly what Marie Kratz, 81, did in the Classy Seniors league at Fair Lanes Southwest on Dec. 14."The Classy Seniors league started back in 1962," current president Betty Franks said.
FEATURES
By Tanika White | February 14, 2005
During awards season, we look forward to the Grammys because musicians -- more than actors -- have real fun and take real risks with fashion. Here, then, are our picks for best, worst and "what in the world were they thinking?" from last night's festivities: Best dressed -- Waldorf's own Christina Milian, in a sparkly white and silver beaded Versace dress. Worst dressed -- Gwen Stefani, on stage performing in what looked like rags wrapped in a Valentine's Day bow. Best-dressed band -- Hoobastank, in festive but stylish polka dot ties, military school jackets, velvet blazers and spiked boy-band hair.
NEWS
By Muphen Whitney and Muphen Whitney,Contributing Writer | August 23, 1992
Friday was Quarter Horse Day at the Howard County Fair.Registered American Quarter Horses and their riders competed in 59 classes throughout the day. The horses showed their stuff in halter classes, as well as showmanship, western performance, trail, reining and English classes.Among the day's competitors was High Class Occasion, a 2-year-old filly owned by Woodbine residents Ivan and Jamie Markowitz. "This is her very first show," Mr. Markowitz said fondly of the lovely sorrel he has owned since April.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | August 8, 1993
The classy My Frenchman edged the stubborn Tonkas Mean Streak in the final strides yesterday to capture the $51,628 Basil Hall Stakes at Pimlico Race Course.Trapped along the rail, jockey Mike Luzzi angled My Frenchman to the outside of Tonkas Mean Streak and prevailed by a neck in a thrilling finish. Soar on Wings, who recently shipped in from Churchill Downs, was third."My horse was a little intimidated on the rail," Luzzi said. "Once he got clear, he found his stride. He really didn't take to the track well but we got the job done."
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 22, 2012
The holiday season calendar tends to fill up pretty quickly, so it's not too soon to start your shopping for classical music concerts in December. One classy upcoming program to keep in mind is the Columbia Orchestra's next concert on Saturday, Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. Just as chestnuts are roasting on an open fire at this time of year, the program ignites with beloved musical chestnuts by Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff. However, it also includes the Maryland premiere of a short piece by New York-based composer Nkeiru Okoye.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
After 11 years in office, Annapolis Alderwoman Classie Hoyle has decided to retire. There's just one thing she has left to do first. As she rolled around her district this week in her red Cadillac DeVille - with personal license plates reading "HOYLE" - the three-term Democrat recalled what inspired her to run for office in the first place and the legacy she would like to leave behind as she takes more time to care for her ailing husband. "Look at those sidewalks," said Hoyle, 76, as she turned on Forest Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
The Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre is in the midst of its 40th anniversary season, a significant milestone for a company that has tackled a sizable breadth of repertoire, from "Lysistrata" to "Hairspray," and maintained wallet-friendly ticket prices the whole time. This year, the troupe, based at the Community College of Baltimore County in Essex, has offered productions of "The King and I" and "Steel Magnolias," as well as a children's show, "Dr. Dolittle. " An eager, if uneven, production of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical "Sunset Boulevard" opened last weekend on the main stage; "Laura," a play version of the hit 1940s film, opens Friday in the cabaret theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
It's Wednesday night in Upper Fells Point and I'm sitting at the bar of the restaurant Salt. The restaurant has entered its chilled-out mode; dinner service ends in a half-hour at 10:30 p.m. A jazzy score - Charles Mingus and Roy Hargrove - murmurs in the background, and a mute TV is ignored in a far corner. A dozen or so green-colored lamps that look like a squadron of flying saucers give the bar a cool, moody glow. Though the atmosphere is serene, the bar, which seats about 12, is full.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam | October 20, 2011
So apparently back in 1999, Sweet Dee Reynolds convinced the Gang to build a bunker to store supplies in preparation for Y2K. After the mass hysteria passed, and computers did NOT take over the world, the bunker was utilized for alternative purposes. Dennis has been bringing women down to the bunker for recreational activities, while Charlie has been surviving on their dried food products. When the “Storm of the Century” hits the East Coast, Mac, Charlie and Dennis head to the makeshift Walmart, to supply the bunker while Dee boards up the windows and Frank eats a boiled egg in his pocket.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
From the sidewalk in front of the Butchers Hill home of Jay Rubin and Frank Mondimore, a reminder unique to Maryland sport gives passers-by pause. Stubby and banged-up duckpins, alongside shiny bowling trophies, line the sills inside of two street-level windows. Next to that hometown image, a flower urn sits on a concrete slab in front of double oak doors, their arched windows reflecting the corner grocery store across the street. The brick exterior looks new, providing a clue that this house is a relatively recent arrival to the block.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 27, 2007
It's easy to stereotype the South Florida sports fan, especially when all you seem to hear about this time of year is the Daytona 500 and spring training, but there is something for everyone down here - even the bluebloods who would not be caught dead at an event as base as an automobile race or an Orioles exhibition game. For them, there is the Palm Beach Polo Equestrian Club, where 2004 Olympian McLain Ward won the $75,000 Bainbridge Idle Dice Classic on Sunday. The crowd of about 10,000 included the Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson, so it obviously was a classy affair.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG | January 16, 2008
With Joe Gibbs hanging up his whistle last week and Tony Dungy contemplating doing the same this week, let's pay tribute to the type of coach both men represent - the Classy, Quiet Coach. The Classy, Quiet Coach probably will never get the respect he deserves. Oh, we pay lip service to him. We write columns about him and say things, "I'd like my son to play for him," but then our attention wanes, and we fall in love all over again with a Bill Parcells or a Bill Belichick, someone who is ruthless and someone who screams, demoralizes his players and chews them up and throws them in a ditch when they're all used up. Sports are so closely associated with our expectations and perceptions of manhood in this country that we want the guys in headsets or with clipboards to be gruff, angry, cold men. Bob Knight keeps doing crazy things, and we keep embracing him. Belichick would kidnap the opposing quarterback's dog if it gave his team an advantage on Sunday, and we shrug our shoulders and say, "Whatever it takes."
NEWS
March 20, 2010
The Preakness made a change last year that was both bold and overdue: It ended the BYOB infield. It was a long-standing tradition that brought us memorable feats of drunken stupidity, from the running of the port-a-potties to, legend has it, the attempt to punch a horse in the middle of a race. It was a muddy, foul, debauched mess. Beloved by some, decried by others as a rather poor reflection on the city, it was probably a lawsuit waiting to happen. The change was not greeted warmly by infield denizens, and attendance for last year's race was the lowest in 25 years and down by more than a third from the previous year.
SPORTS
March 20, 2010
T he Preakness made a change last year that was both bold and overdue: It ended the BYOB infield. It was a long-standing tradition that brought us memorable feats of drunken stupidity, from the running of the port-a-potties to, legend has it, the attempt to punch a horse in the middle of a race. It was a muddy, foul, debauched mess. Beloved by some, decried by others as a rather poor reflection on the city, it was probably a lawsuit waiting to happen. The change was not greeted warmly by infield denizens, and attendance for last year's race was the lowest in 25 years and down by more than a third from the previous year.
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