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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Ask first-year teachers what their greatest challenge is, and they are likely to say it has been managing squirming elementary students or keeping sleepy teenagers engaged. But too few universities that train the next generation of teachers are giving them a foundation in effective classroom management techniques, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality, a research advocacy group, which highlighted St. Mary's College of Maryland as one of the best in the nation.
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NEWS
February 19, 2014
As a former Baltimore City schoolteacher I read with interest your story regarding workers' compensation for teachers injured by students ( "Painful lessons: Run-ins with students take toll on teachers, city finances," Feb. 16). While I was never injured myself, I broke up many a fight in my 6 t h - and 7 t h -grade classrooms, and there were occasions where I certainly felt concerned for my own safety confronting a particularly threatening student. What I find especially appalling is the idea that a teacher, due to "ineffectiveness," is in any way responsible for the behavior of children who assault one another or staff members at school.
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NEWS
May 22, 2013
Saturday's "your turn" pieces on education reform ("The fallacy of reform" and "Diversity, choice key for schools," May 18) did not seem to address Baltimore City schools' educational history nor requirements in a practical, yet considerate way. Schools CEO Andrés Alonso cut the staff at headquarters, then used the space to benefit at-risk students. He built consensus to achieve improved attendance, test scores, and graduation rates. Additionally, why do some live in the past and complain schools are crumbling?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Ask first-year teachers what their greatest challenge is, and they are likely to say it has been managing squirming elementary students or keeping sleepy teenagers engaged. But too few universities that train the next generation of teachers are giving them a foundation in effective classroom management techniques, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality, a research advocacy group, which highlighted St. Mary's College of Maryland as one of the best in the nation.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
With the new school year in Anne Arundel County about a week away, the county's new teachers are receiving instruction on how to best approach the challenges ahead — including managing a classroom, decorating a bulletin board and handling parent phone calls. The county will begin the school year with more than 300 new teachers and are preparing them with its Right Start Teacher Support Program, which included a recent three-day event at Old Mill High School in Millersville.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 30, 2005
WHEN SAM Brown walked into Baltimore Polytechnic Institute that September day in 1967, it all seemed quite appropriate. Brown, who had wanted to be a math teacher since he was in junior high school, was starting his first teaching job. Poly was in its first year at a new location, having moved to its current Falls Road site from the school's decades-long digs at North Avenue and Calvert Street. Brown has been at the same place ever since. For the past 38 years, he has taught math, acted as adviser to clubs, served as chairman of the math department, been a vice principal, been instrumental in getting the school's first black principal hired and developed the calculus course every Poly student must take before he or she graduates.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Marley Elementary School teacher Kelly Closs is about two weeks from stepping head-first into role reversal. The first-year teacher concedes that while growing up in New Jersey, she didn't like elementary school. Her teachers, she said, never grabbed her attention, and the classes didn't mesh with her energetic persona. Closs spoke last week about what lay ahead for her during Anne Arundel County public schools' New Teacher Orientation, a three-day event for educators that are either new to the profession or new to the school district.
NEWS
By Arthur Levine | August 2, 2000
NEW YORK --You can hardly pick up a newspaper without reading a story about the need for 2 million new teachers in this decade, a number as staggering as it's worrisome. All of which makes me think that we've become so obsessed with the quantity required to meet growing public school needs that we're failing to give at least equal attention to the matter of the quality of the next generation of teachers who will be in classrooms well into this new century. Incidentally, while there is a tremendous focus on the teacher shortage in the coming decade, history shows we can by no means be sure of the 2 million projection.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1999
CHRISTINA MAHER wants to teach math and science in middle school, so where did she find herself in her first experience as a student teacher?On her hands and knees in a first-grade classroom at Severn Elementary in Anne Arundel County. Holding a seminar with six squirming children. The subject: the sound of the long "o."Teaching, Maher discovered when she finally left Towson University and met real flesh-and-blood children the second semester of her senior year, is an 18-hour-a-day job. And just because first-graders are so cute and innocent they'd break your heart, they're not easy to teach.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
As a former Baltimore City schoolteacher I read with interest your story regarding workers' compensation for teachers injured by students ( "Painful lessons: Run-ins with students take toll on teachers, city finances," Feb. 16). While I was never injured myself, I broke up many a fight in my 6 t h - and 7 t h -grade classrooms, and there were occasions where I certainly felt concerned for my own safety confronting a particularly threatening student. What I find especially appalling is the idea that a teacher, due to "ineffectiveness," is in any way responsible for the behavior of children who assault one another or staff members at school.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Marley Elementary School teacher Kelly Closs is about two weeks from stepping head-first into role reversal. The first-year teacher concedes that while growing up in New Jersey, she didn't like elementary school. Her teachers, she said, never grabbed her attention, and the classes didn't mesh with her energetic persona. Closs spoke last week about what lay ahead for her during Anne Arundel County public schools' New Teacher Orientation, a three-day event for educators that are either new to the profession or new to the school district.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
Saturday's "your turn" pieces on education reform ("The fallacy of reform" and "Diversity, choice key for schools," May 18) did not seem to address Baltimore City schools' educational history nor requirements in a practical, yet considerate way. Schools CEO Andrés Alonso cut the staff at headquarters, then used the space to benefit at-risk students. He built consensus to achieve improved attendance, test scores, and graduation rates. Additionally, why do some live in the past and complain schools are crumbling?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Eleanor Saulsbury's entry into teaching did not bode well for a long, successful career. When she graduated from what is now Coppin State University in 1968, she had asked to be placed at Norwood Elementary in Baltimore County because it was close to her family's home in Edgemere. She was naive, she said, not to think that the fact that she was an African-American might be an issue in an all-white school during a year when riots had left blocks in Baltimore burned and looted. Right away, a parent demanded that her child be taken out of Saulsbury's classroom.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
With the new school year in Anne Arundel County about a week away, the county's new teachers are receiving instruction on how to best approach the challenges ahead — including managing a classroom, decorating a bulletin board and handling parent phone calls. The county will begin the school year with more than 300 new teachers and are preparing them with its Right Start Teacher Support Program, which included a recent three-day event at Old Mill High School in Millersville. The event was designed to familiarize teachers with school procedures, protocol, content and program areas.
NEWS
April 25, 2008
Conflicts concern many doctors The National Physicians Alliance strongly agrees with the sentiments expressed in The Sun's editorial that addresses the Merck ghostwriting scandal ("Medical ghosts," April 20). The pharmaceutical industry's marketing interests have indeed infiltrated virtually all areas of medicine, from research to education to daily practice. Even medical students - who are years away from having the power to prescribe drugs - are often the targets of promotional gifting and free meals.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 30, 2005
WHEN SAM Brown walked into Baltimore Polytechnic Institute that September day in 1967, it all seemed quite appropriate. Brown, who had wanted to be a math teacher since he was in junior high school, was starting his first teaching job. Poly was in its first year at a new location, having moved to its current Falls Road site from the school's decades-long digs at North Avenue and Calvert Street. Brown has been at the same place ever since. For the past 38 years, he has taught math, acted as adviser to clubs, served as chairman of the math department, been a vice principal, been instrumental in getting the school's first black principal hired and developed the calculus course every Poly student must take before he or she graduates.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Eleanor Saulsbury's entry into teaching did not bode well for a long, successful career. When she graduated from what is now Coppin State University in 1968, she had asked to be placed at Norwood Elementary in Baltimore County because it was close to her family's home in Edgemere. She was naive, she said, not to think that the fact that she was an African-American might be an issue in an all-white school during a year when riots had left blocks in Baltimore burned and looted. Right away, a parent demanded that her child be taken out of Saulsbury's classroom.
NEWS
By Arthur Levine | August 2, 2000
NEW YORK --You can hardly pick up a newspaper without reading a story about the need for 2 million new teachers in this decade, a number as staggering as it's worrisome. All of which makes me think that we've become so obsessed with the quantity required to meet growing public school needs that we're failing to give at least equal attention to the matter of the quality of the next generation of teachers who will be in classrooms well into this new century. Incidentally, while there is a tremendous focus on the teacher shortage in the coming decade, history shows we can by no means be sure of the 2 million projection.
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