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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Students take note: The classroom of the future might make it difficult to pass notes or sit where teachers might not call on you to answer questions. Yet you might consider the departure from the traditional setting a change for the better. That's what officials at Howard Community College say. They have worked with Michigan-based office furniture manufacturing company Herman Miller to create a pilot classroom that is changing the way students and teachers approach instruction. Called the Learning Studio, the classroom all but does away with the front-to-back setting and instead equips it with technology usually reserved for computer labs and auditoriums.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Dorothy V. Thomas, a retired city public school educator who lovingly guided students at Windsor Hills Elementary School for nearly two decades, died June 10 of respiratory failure at Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center in Catonsville. She was 98. "Mrs. Thomas was such a powerful and phenomenal influence on my life and all of her students. She was old-school, and her commitment went beyond the classroom," said Sidney Clifton, a former student who is now a Hollywood producer.
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FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
Heather Burt knows that above-the-knee skirts, the flash of a midriff or cleavage, and jeans are no-nos while she is working as a fourth-grade teacher at Meade Heights Elementary School in Anne Arundel County. She has never been warned against wearing these clothes because she understands the unspoken rule. "That is the rule of thumb," Burt said. "You want to look professional My [students] wear uniforms. It is not very professional if you wear jeans if the kids can't. Dressing professionally, the kids take you more seriously.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
The editorial regarding the proposal to put more computers in the hands of Baltimore County students makes a good point ( "Digital classrooms," Feb. 11): "While such considerations are important, they don't address the larger question of how digital devices actually improve the quality of classroom instruction or what educators can do with them that they can't do with traditional blackboards, paper and pencils. " However, his argument is parallel to one that opposes change. Of course, it's scary, different from the norm and difficult for all involved.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Anne Arundel Community College is offering course credit for those who have accumulated years of skills in a particular field outside the classroom. The program, called the Prior Learning Assessment, is designed for former college students who have been in the workforce for many years and are headed back to school to gain more college experience or update skills for current jobs, school officials said. The school will hold information sessions Oct. 13 and Nov. 10, and recently began registration for its winter term.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
It's always refreshing to see a large public institution encourage employees to exercise a bit more common sense in the performance of their duties. That's why, in principle, we welcome the city school system's revised student code of conduct that gives administrators more discretion in deciding how to discipline students who bring toy guns, water pistols or other inappropriate items to school. Nevertheless, the lack of transparency in the way the recent changes were carried out was unfortunate.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
A student at Baltimore Community High School is being charged after an altercation with his teacher, according to city schools. The incident occurred Wednesday morning in the hallway near the teacher's classroom at the school at 6820 Fait Ave. in Southeast Baltimore, according to a statement from city schools. The teacher, who was not identified, was treated at a nearby hospital. Baltimore City Public Schools police charged the student with aggravated assault, and he could receive an extended suspension or expulsion under the schools' code of conduct, the statement says.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Ask first-year teachers what their greatest challenge is, and they are likely to say it has been managing squirming elementary students or keeping sleepy teenagers engaged. But too few universities that train the next generation of teachers are giving them a foundation in effective classroom management techniques, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality, a research advocacy group, which highlighted St. Mary's College of Maryland as one of the best in the nation.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
The Maryland Department of Education defines a high school diploma as a 12-year course of study and achievement. Twelve years cannot be shortened, which is why the Baltimore City Department of Social Services had to go to Pennsylvania. There, what you know is more important than how long you sat in a classroom ( "Baltimore foster care youths get diploma in a day in Philadelphia," Nov. 23). I brought this problem to the attention of state officials in the 1980s, when my son scored a 1330 on the SAT at the age of 13. The Baltimore County officials would not allow him to attend college because he hadn't sat for 12 years in a school classroom.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
As principal of a small Southeast Baltimore school, Anthony Ruby has guided an array of first-year teachers, from the stars who seem to have an innate sense of how to handle a class to those who were so ineffective he declined to renew their contracts. When teachers aren't effective, he said, "it is not fair to our kids," many of whom are low-income and immigrant. Hundreds of teachers are hired each year to fill vacancies in Baltimore, and the majority will be newcomers to the profession.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Dreambuilder was making slow progress. The 35-foot-long sailboat meandered in the waters off Annapolis on Wednesday as its teenage crew stood on deck and watched in dismay. “I don't think I've ever gone so fast,” Tommy Pipher, 16, said dryly from the helm. “I think the rudder's broken,” said Ellie Wood, 16. Pipher and Wood, rising juniors at South River High School in Edgewater, are part of a group of 13 students who have been learning the ins and outs of sailing and navigation over two weeks at the National Sailing Hall of Fame, a sailing education nonprofit in Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
In May, Loyola Maryland's Joe Fletcher received the William C. Schmeisser Award as the nation's top defender. Now he has the hardware to show he brought that same intensity and dedication to the classroom, too. Fletcher was named the Patriot League Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year, an award voted on by conference member schools that honors the top performer in the classroom and in competition. Scholar-Athletes of the Year in their respective sports are eligible for the overall honor.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Stuller | June 23, 2014
As the school year ends, teachers reflect, reminiscing about their favorite students, reveling in their successes. Nostalgia lingers as books are packed, lessons stored, and students' notes of appreciation are scanned and filed on a flash drive as "artifacts" - an outcome of the Common Core. While this year brought complaints from colleagues over everything from teacher accountability to lavatory access during school reconstruction, I realize my year lacked something much more poignant than political policy or bladder relief: chalk.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Most years, the last day of school comes with a sigh of relief, but this year what students and teachers describe is more akin to the body-draining feeling of finishing a marathon. "If I could frame it in one word I would just say 'exhausted,' " said Anna Gannon, a technology teacher at Gorman Crossing Elementary School in Howard County. "Whew. This has been the longest year ever," said Blair Todd, an eighth-grade history teacher at Charles Carroll Middle School in Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group of young men at Howard Community College are giving new meaning to the Orwellian phrase, "Big Brother is watching you. " They are members of the community college's leadership program Howard PRIDE (Purpose, Respect, Initiative, Determination, Excellence), and their designated Big Brother is Steven Freeman, the program's assistant director. To say they relish his watchful eye is an understatement. What began as a pilot program three years ago offering math support to boost graduation rates among African-American males has become a resource and mentoring tool for any Howard Community College male of color.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | December 26, 1996
THE BIG QUESTION for the new city-state education partnership is: Now what? If approved by the General Assembly, the city receives $50 million a year in additional state aid, and the state gets a major role in school policy-making.But that's the easy part. What's elusive, as other urban school systems undergoing radical restructuring have found out, are reform policies that improve the academic performance of low-achieving students.Here is a top-10 list of policies for the new board's consideration.
NEWS
By Jean Waller Brune | April 2, 2004
BRITNEY SPEARS videos, rap music, Abercrombie & Fitch advertisements - our children are constantly bombarded by media images depicting young men and women in overtly sexual situations. Lyrics promote violence and poor behavior choices. Entertainers, politicians and athletes, once role models, often provide highly visible examples of immoral conduct. Parents are deeply concerned about their children's values and behaviors. Schools can help parents raise children of character in today's seemingly toxic climate.
NEWS
By Brenda Payne | May 20, 2014
An open letter to Douglas Gansler, attorney general of Maryland and candidate for governor Dear Mr. Gansler: As another school year winds down and I complete my 21 s t year in the Maryland Public School System, I am pondering where I should cast my vote in the upcoming gubernatorial election. It is a difficult choice. I do not need my union to tell me for whom I should vote. I can choose on my own. After your recent ad campaign, I can tell you who will not have my vote: you. I watched the ad on television and laughed at it, even as I shook my head and rolled my eyes.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
Banking industry veteran and native Baltimorean Scott Wilfong got involved with the Living Classrooms Foundation to help improve lives in some of East Baltimore's neediest neighborhoods, including Perkins Homes, the Fayette Street corridor and McElderry Park. Wilfong, chairman, president and CEO of SunTrust Bank Greater Washington/Maryland, began eight years ago working with the foundation's Children's Target Investment Zone initiative, in which the foundation, area public schools and other groups offer East Baltimore residents job training as well as training in work readiness, financial literacy, computer literacy and other life skills.
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