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By The Charlotte Observer | April 25, 2011
Officials at Phylicia Barnes' school said Monday that Union Academy has been in mourning since learning about her death. Barnes, a senior at the North Carolina school, was 16 when she disappeared from her half sister's apartment in Baltimore on Dec. 28. Her body was discovered last week in the Susquehanna River near Conowingo Dam, about 40 miles north of the city. On Thursday, the state medical examiner identified the body as Barnes. As Union Academy, students returned from spring break Monday, flags were at half-staff and grief counselors were on duty.
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By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
Sen. John McCain of Arizona, a classmate of Charles R. Larson at the U.S. Naval Academy, says the four-star admiral and former academy superintendent was a "dear friend" and "great man" who, like McCain's father and grandfather, cast a large shadow. Admiral Larson, 77, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis after a long illness. "As the son and grandson of four-star admirals, I have long been accustomed to living in the large shadows cast by great men," McCain said in a statement Sunday afternoon.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
Eleven-year-old Joshua Torres died of complications from muscular dystrophy in October before the leaves fell from the trees, but his Havre de Grace classmates haven't forgotten their friend in a wheelchair.Over the winter, the Roye-Williams Elementary fifth-graders turned their grief into a classroom project, gathering dimes and quarters and seeking larger donations from parents and local businesses to raise $400 to buy a memorial for Joshua -- a desk designed for the disabled."What started out as a dream for Room 308 has become a reality," the students' teacher, Renee Villareal, said at an emotional ceremony yesterday to dedicate the desk and to remember Joshua.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn always will be linked by a splendid Sunday in July 2007, when baseball fans massed to celebrate all that was still good in the game. The pair went into the Hall of Fame together - Gwynn, the voluble hitting wizard, and Ripken, the indestructible shortstop. They seemed to admire each other as much as the crowd appreciated them both. So Ripken reacted with sadness Monday when news emerged that Gwynn had died at age 54 after an extended battle with cancer . “This is an extraordinarily sad day,” Ripken said in a statement.
NEWS
By Russell Martin | February 23, 1994
IN THE fall of 1989, Ian Drummond began first grade.After a year in special-education kindergarten, this nonspeaking autistic boy was deemed ready to take another step into the world.But before Ian started at Gateway Elementary in Woodland Park, Colo., his mother came to school to describe her son to his future classmates.She showed them a videotape -- images of a blond boy, who looked normal, swinging and sliding on their playground.His mother explained that Ian had a sister named Sarah and a dog, that he liked stories about animals and that he loved to watch movies.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
Ross Perot arrived at the U.S. Naval Academy in 1949 a short, jug-eared Texas boy with a broken nose. It was his 19th birthday and he had never been on a ship or seen the ocean.But he tackled the academy the way he did everything else -- with a confident vengeance.Mr. Perot emerged four years later as president of the class of 1953 and a devoted champion of the academy."I hope that each midshipman here tonight realizes how fortunate you are to have this unique opportunity to attend the Naval Academy," an enthusiastic Mr. Perot told the midshipmen during a 1990 speech in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
Ross Perot arrived at the Naval Academy in 1949 a short, jug-eared Texas boy with a broken nose. It was his 19th birthday and he had never been on a ship or seen the ocean.But he tackled the academy the way he did everything else -- with a confident vengeance.Mr. Perot emerged four years later as president of the class of 1953 and a devoted champion of the academy."I hope that each midshipman here tonight realizes how fortunate you are to have this unique opportunity to attend the Naval Academy," an enthusiastic Mr. Perot told the midshipmen during a 1990 speech in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
Dumbarton Middle School in Rodgers Forge has suspended indefinitely a sixth-grade pupil who brought a toy gun to school and told classmates it was real, school officials said yesterday. Assistant Principal Michael Etzel said he removed the boy from his first-period class on Tuesday, after a classmate reported the remarks. "At no time was there a threat to any kids in the school," Etzel said yesterday. The boy, whose name was not released by school officials for confidentiality reasons, will be suspended until he receives a hearing from the school board.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
For the past two days, men in their 70s hugged, exchanged addresses, shared old black-and-white photos, snapped new pictures and swapped stories about their days as midshipmen at the Naval Academy.About 370 members of the Class of 1947 returned to Annapolis for their 50th anniversary reunion, distressed over the scandals that have rocked their alma mater, but ready to act on the words of their famous classmate, former President Jimmy Carter, who urged them to "improve the academy's image."
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | March 23, 2008
Nick Sabo, a South River High School senior, recently received his yearbook order forms, including ballots to vote for senior superlatives, such as most popular or class clown. He hardly recognized any of the nominees' names. "He didn't know anybody, and it broke my heart," said his mother, Mary Ann Sabo, who lives in Edgewater. "I guess students are afraid." Sabo was born with cerebral palsy, a brain injury that put him in a wheelchair, slurs his speech, and made him an outcast among his peers.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Christian Nicholson of Columbia gave up a job as personal banker for his true calling, being dispatched via ambulance to help victims requiring immediate, sometimes life-saving attention. Meg Simmers of Baltimore felt a similar tug, leaving an air-quality management job. The two are members of the Howard County Fire and Rescue Services' 28th academy class, and on a recent Friday, they and about three dozen classmates took part in emergency training that included assisting a mock victim who had suffered a fall from an exercise machine at a gym. It was a fairly tame drill.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
Kudos to Susan Reimer on her commentary (" Blue Ribbons for Grace March 26) highlighting the courage and compassion of Grace McComas' classmates in the face of administrative obstacles. Grace's friends, who are seeking to honor and celebrate the life of Grace during what should have been her graduation, have realized that cyberbullying is not a trivial issue. It is a serious, 21st century problem our young people are struggling with. Grace's classmates should be honored for bringing this issue to the fore while also celebrating Grace's life.
NEWS
By Sara Toth, stoth@tribune.com | March 29, 2014
Grace McComas would have graduated from Glenelg High School May 29. At the upcoming commencement, friends and classmates want to honor Grace, who was a sophomore in 2012 when she committed suicide after months of cyber-bullying. After initial opposition from the school and school system, it now appears they'll have that chance. Grace's mother, Christine McComas, took to her daughter's Facebook memorial page March 24 to express sadness after "hearing that Grace's classmates had asked to wear small blue ribbons at graduation but were denied by both the school and the Board of Ed(ucation)
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
WASHINGTON - Closing arguments are expected Thursday in the court-martial of a Naval Academy football player accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman, after testimony Wednesday during which the alleged victim acknowledged initially withholding information from investigators and asking the defendant to lie. Midshipman Joshua Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault and three counts of making a...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Troy Douglas no longer sits at his desk at William Paca Elementary. The third-grader's classmates and teachers have decorated it with cards and balloons to preserve his memory. The 8-year-old no longer walks past the house on Lakewood Avenue that burst into flames last week as he made his way home from school, leaving Troy buried under bricks and debris. A wreath of blue flowers - his favorite color - hangs from the chain-link fence surrounding the ruined structure. At Troy's funeral Wednesday, mourners said that though the bright-eyed boy is gone, Southeast Baltimore will not forget the smile and sense of humor that brought his community together in both life and death.
NEWS
By Justin George and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
Darion Marcus Aguilar became a vegan after watching a television show about how animals are slaughtered. That transformation, says a family friend, shows just how much the teen cared about life. But with Aguilar, 19, suspected of killing two people Saturday at The Mall in Columbia, his family and friends are struggling to understand how the quiet person they knew could be linked to such a crime. After shooting the employees of a skateboard apparel shop, Aguilar turned the weapon on himself, police say. "The best I could explain Darion's heart to you is: Darion is a vegan," Ellis Cropper said Sunday.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Rebecca Miller's five-year high school reunion seemed dead on arrival. Only 30 of her 200-odd classmates from Joppatowne High School class of 2005 RSVPed on a Facebook page set up for the reunion, which was booked at a Harford County bar last year. As the event neared, interest waned. Eventually, the reunion devolved into an informal party at the class president's house. "Maybe one or two people went," Miller said. "They were posting on their Facebook status, 'Hey, it's a great party, everyone should come over.' No one came.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2000
Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps entered a different kind of competition yesterday. At 9:15 a.m., the gangly kid who placed fifth in the 200-meter butterfly at the Sydney Olympics started his sophomore year at Towson High School. Squeezing a set of broad swimmer's shoulders between two classmates in a cramped row of desks, the 15-year-old plunged into 10th-grade English and the crafting of a thesis statement. "Michael, do you have an excuse for your absences?" asked English teacher Jeff Brotman, teasing Phelps for missing the first three weeks of school.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Two former Naval Academy football players will stand trial early next year on charges that they sexually assaulted a classmate. Midshipman Eric Graham's court-martial is scheduled for Jan. 27 and Midshipman Joshua Tate's court-martial is scheduled for Feb. 10, according to Naval Academy officials. Graham, a senior at the academy from Eight Mile, Ala., is charged with abusive sexual contact, and Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault. Both are charged with making false official statements.
NEWS
June 8, 2013
Dear Maryland taxpayer, My eldest child graduated from her public high school recently, and there was much celebration and excitement. When the 425 proud students of the Class of 2013 marched into the new Tiger Arena at Towson University in their caps and gowns, there was hardly a dry eye in the house. The customary "Pomp and Circumstance" echoed across the gym. Speeches were made. Award-winners were recognized. Diplomas were awarded and hands were shaken. And from the school principal to the valedictorians, there were heartfelt thanks given - to classmates, to teachers, to school administrators and yes, even to parents.
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