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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
The National Security Agency says it found top-secret information on hard drives that were seized in a failed espionage probe, and the agency is refusing to release the computers — despite the continued protests of their owners. In court filings in Baltimore this week, the government says the seized computers "cannot lawfully be returned. " NSA's deputy chief of staff for signals intelligence concluded that disclosing the contents of one computer hard drive would "cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security.
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NEWS
January 8, 2014
There are various opinions about Edward Snowden, and I feel a need to add mine to the mix ("Snowden has more U.S.-Israel secrets to expose: Greenwald," Jan. 6). Mr. Snowden has violated U.S. laws and needs to be punished, the question is how - death penalty or imprisonment - and if the latter, for how long? To make the public aware of unclassified information makes him a whistle blower, but to publicize classified information makes him a spy. And then to run and hide in Russia shows that he was completely aware of the damage he has done to aspects of our national security.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Shielded by a screen to conceal his identity, a CIA agent testified yesterday that he gave John Huang 37 briefings on classified information regarding Asia, unaware that the former Commerce Department official was to be "walled off" from policy matters, especially about China.As the Senate's hearings into campaign fund-raising abuses entered their second week, Republicans on the Governmental Affairs Committee again focused on Huang, the Democratic fund-raiser who solicited questionable contributions from the Asian-American community, more than half of which has had to be returned.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
When an interim engineering dean at the Johns Hopkins University asked a well-known cryptography professor to remove a blog post about the National Security Agency from university servers, he said he did so because he feared “legal consequences.” Hopkins never defined those perceived consequences, but the concern was based on professor Matthew D. Green's linking in the post to articles from The New York Times, ProPublica and the Guardian....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - The top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee said yesterday that John R. Bolton might have mishandled classified information by sharing with another State Department official details about a communication intercepted by the National Security Agency. The assertion, by Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia, followed a two-week review of the issue by the committee's staff, which remains divided over whether Bolton did anything wrong. Rockefeller outlined his concerns in a three-page letter to the leaders of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the same day that the full Senate began debate on Bolton's nomination to be ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and the other leaders of Congress' intelligence committees this week issued a strong, bi-partisan statement of condemnation for recent leaks of classified information about America's clandestine operations abroad, including its cyber-warfare against Iran and drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. They promised new legislation to clamp down on leaks that they say can endanger Americans. Sen. John McCain went further, alleging that the Obama administration has engaged in a double standard on leaking — aggressively prosecuting low-level leakers while tolerating or even encouraging high-level leaks of information that could bolster the president's re-election prospects.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
There was no question that Pfc. Bradley Manning broke the law when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks. He admitted as much in pleading guilty to a number of the lesser charges against him, and his motivations - whatever they were - and his evident naivete didn't change that fact. Nonetheless, the case against him was a vexing one. It was never clear that his actions harmed national security in the way the Obama administration claimed, and his mistreatment during a portion of the time he has been held in custody was deplorable.
NEWS
By J. William Leonard | August 18, 2011
Every 6-year-old knows what a secret is. But apparently our nation's national security establishment does not. Consider this strange case from earlier this year. On June 8, the National Security Agency, a top-secret government spy agency, heralded the "declassification" of a 200-year-old publication, translated from the original German, on cryptography. It turns out, however, as reported by Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists on his blog Secrecy News, that the 1809 study had long been publicly available and had even been digitized and published online through Google Books several years earlier.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 2000
WASHINGTON - A bill containing language that would greatly tighten the lid of secrecy on government information has been sent to President Clinton, and administration officials said yesterday there was sharp division over whether he should sign or veto it. The language, which is contained in the Intelligence Authorization Act, would subject a government official convicted of disclosing any classified information to three years in prison. The "antileak" legislation was requested by the Central Intelligence Agency, which says it has lost agents and sophisticated surveillance methods because of newspaper articles based on leaks of classified information.
NEWS
By MARY CURTIUS and MARY CURTIUS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2005
WASHINGTON -- With pressure mounting on the Bush administration over its detainee policies, Republican House and Senate leaders are asking for an investigation into who leaked information to The Washington Post about secret CIA prisons abroad. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee and House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois requested that the Senate and House intelligence committees "immediately initiate a joint investigation into the possible release of classified information to the media" about the existence of the prisons.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
There was no question that Pfc. Bradley Manning broke the law when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks. He admitted as much in pleading guilty to a number of the lesser charges against him, and his motivations - whatever they were - and his evident naivete didn't change that fact. Nonetheless, the case against him was a vexing one. It was never clear that his actions harmed national security in the way the Obama administration claimed, and his mistreatment during a portion of the time he has been held in custody was deplorable.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and the other leaders of Congress' intelligence committees this week issued a strong, bi-partisan statement of condemnation for recent leaks of classified information about America's clandestine operations abroad, including its cyber-warfare against Iran and drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. They promised new legislation to clamp down on leaks that they say can endanger Americans. Sen. John McCain went further, alleging that the Obama administration has engaged in a double standard on leaking — aggressively prosecuting low-level leakers while tolerating or even encouraging high-level leaks of information that could bolster the president's re-election prospects.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
The National Security Agency says it found top-secret information on hard drives that were seized in a failed espionage probe, and the agency is refusing to release the computers — despite the continued protests of their owners. In court filings in Baltimore this week, the government says the seized computers "cannot lawfully be returned. " NSA's deputy chief of staff for signals intelligence concluded that disclosing the contents of one computer hard drive would "cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
Analysts with the National Security Agency see the threats coming at corporate America: viruses, worms and other malware targeting the computer networks that serve the nation's banks, utilities and businesses. But the 64-year-old law that established the modern U.S. intelligence community prevents them from sharing the classified details with the private businesses in the cross hairs. "I'm really concerned that we will have some type of serious attack within the year," said Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, who receives security briefings as the top-ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee.
NEWS
By J. William Leonard | August 18, 2011
Every 6-year-old knows what a secret is. But apparently our nation's national security establishment does not. Consider this strange case from earlier this year. On June 8, the National Security Agency, a top-secret government spy agency, heralded the "declassification" of a 200-year-old publication, translated from the original German, on cryptography. It turns out, however, as reported by Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists on his blog Secrecy News, that the 1809 study had long been publicly available and had even been digitized and published online through Google Books several years earlier.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Thomas Andrews Drake, the former NSA employee accused of felony espionage but convicted of a misdemeanor computer violation, was sentenced Friday in Baltimore's federal court to 240 hours of community service and one year's probation. It was an abrupt end to a lengthy case that became a rallying point for both free-speech advocates and those seeking to plug media leaks. It had also threatened to imprison Drake, who was accused of retaining classified information to give to a Baltimore Sun reporter, for up to 35 years before a surprising plea deal was struck on the eve of trial last month.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Jonathan Pollard, the American convicted of spying for Israel, has tried to slip classified information into 14 of his letters from prison, Defense Secretary Les Aspin has told the White House.In one of his final acts in office, Mr. Aspin told President Clinton in a confidential letter last week that Pollard should not be given leniency, as American Jewish groups and the Israeli government have requested, because the Pentagon still considers him to be a security risk and because of the severity of his offenses.
NEWS
By JONATHAN TURLEY | May 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I live among spies. Some of my neighbors are spies. Some of my co-workers are spies. I even know spies married to spies who had children who are now spies. Before you diagnose clinical paranoia, I should mention that I live in Washington and, according to the Bush administration, virtually everyone I know is engaged in either clear or possible acts of espionage. Two Washington lobbyists face criminal charges in Alexandria, Va., under the 1917 Espionage Act for receiving classified information in oral conversations with a former Defense Department employee, Lawrence A. Franklin.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
Years of government pursuit came to an end Friday when former NSA employee Thomas Drake pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of "exceeding the authorized use of a computer" — a quiet conclusion to an aggressive espionage case. Drake, who warned government investigators about wasteful National Security Agency programs, was indicted last year for passing information to a Baltimore Sun reporter in 2006 and 2007. He could have received up to 35 years in federal prison under a combination of criminal charges, including violation of the Espionage Act, yet he was never charged with leaking classified information.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
A federal judge refused Monday to release the names of potential defense witnesses in a criminal case against a former NSA employee accused of leaking classified information to a reporter, calling the prosecutors' request "highly unusual. " The U.S. Department of Justice had argued that it needed to know witness identities now, months before the scheduled March trial, to ensure that they could be trusted with sensitive information. But attorneys for defendant Thomas Drake, who worked at the National Security Agency until mid-2008, said the government was overreaching.
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