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November 29, 2009
The Chang-Cole Duo and Con Brio Trio perform from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday in the ballroom of Historic Oakland Manor, 5430 Vantage Point Road. Admission is free; however, a donation is suggested. Program includes selections from Bach, Vivaldi and Joplin, as well as holiday music. For more information, call 410-730-4744.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Day after day, someone somewhere discusses the state of classical music, typically with a degree of concern about its long-term survivability. This has been going on for ages, of course, but it has generated something of a cottage industry in recent years. Trepidation about the years ahead is especially prevalent and understandable right now, thanks to such things as the testy contract negotiations going on at the Metropolitan Opera and the recent labor/management battles at the Minnesota Orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Midweek -- OK, End of Week -- Madness offers a quick spin through classical music, via Google autocomplete, via Classic FM in the UK, via Norman Lebrecht (whose blog alerted me to this crazy item in the first place).
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | February 6, 2014
Yury Shadrin and Tian Lu have got the keyboard covered for an upcoming Sundays at Three concert. This husband and wife duo will play music written for piano four hands on Sunday, Feb. 9, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Besides their joint performances as Shadrin and Lu, they have individual performing careers. Those busy schedules include much activity on the local classical music scene. As a duo, they were finalists in the 2013 Rising Stars competition that is part of the Howard County Arts Council's annual Celebration of the Arts.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | August 7, 2012
In the latest example of the trend of spinning off movies, music and more from books, author E.L. James has selected an album of classical music featured in her "Fifty Shades of Grey" trilogy. Baltimore Sun music critic Tim Smth says it's sure to bring a much wider audience to masterworks. Smith notes that one of the pieces mentioned in "Fifty Shades," a years-old recording of music from Thomas Tallis, has hit No. 1 on the UK Classical Singles Chart. James chose 15 pieces for the album, which will be released digitally on Aug. 15; the CD will be released Sept.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 1, 2013
You can expect the music to sound fresh during the Leipzig String Quartet's concert on Saturday, March 2, at 8 p.m., in Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Like the sponsoring Candlelight Concert Society, this chamber music quartet often likes to introduce audiences to contemporary classical music. The only 19th-century piece on the upcoming program is Brahms' Quartet in A minor, Op. 51, No. 2. If that selection by a great German composer seems like a natural choice for a quartet hailing from Leipzig, the rest of the program features much more recently minted music from around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Day after day, someone somewhere discusses the state of classical music, typically with a degree of concern about its long-term survivability. This has been going on for ages, of course, but it has generated something of a cottage industry in recent years. Trepidation about the years ahead is especially prevalent and understandable right now, thanks to such things as the testy contract negotiations going on at the Metropolitan Opera and the recent labor/management battles at the Minnesota Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 27, 2002
The syncopated inflections of ragtime and jazz gave the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's program this week an extra kick. It provided a good opportunity to trace the influences of popular idioms on Igor Stravinsky and Aaron Copland, two giants who helped define classical music in the 20th century. Stravinsky's Ragtime, scored for 11 instruments, suggests a cubist take on Scott Joplin. Melodic fragments are tossed around, ending up in odd places and falling on odd beats; dynamic levels are quirky.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 17, 2005
Folks attending open-mike night at The Funk Box tomorrow may be startled to find a string quartet onstage. That will be the first surprise. Instead of Mozart or Brahms, the Dallas-based ensemble Neo Camerata will be playing original music that founder/composer/violist Mark Landson calls "new classical." Unlike traditional classical chamber music, it will be played on amplified strings and from memory. With his Eastman School of Music training and experience as a violist in an orchestra in Spain, Landson could easily have stayed in the classical realm, but he always felt a strong pull toward pop music.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | December 28, 1997
TO MY MIND, ONE of the most charming classical music programs is National Public Radio's "Performance Today," with host Martin Goldsmith. Among the show's many delights is a weekly commentary titled, appropriately enough, "Coming to Terms."The segment features author and musician Miles Hoffman, who chats knowledgeably about musical terminology and concepts.For listeners who don't instantly know what expressions like "adagio ma non troppo" mean (slow, but not too slow), Hoffman's commentary is a painless alternative to a college-level music appreciation course, served up in bite-sized pieces.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
You can visit Spain without crossing the county line, courtesy of the Howard County Concert Orchestra's "Spanish New Year's Celebration" on Sunday, Jan. 12, at 4 p.m., at St. John's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City. As with a Viennese New Year's-themed concert that the orchestra did in the past, this Spanish New Year's concert deliberately occurs well into January. Howard County Concert Orchestra music director Ronald Mutchnik explained, "It's not so much that it's specifically about New Years so much as thinking that as we head into the middle of winter why not extend the New Year's festivities into the new year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The arts world tends to think in terms of September-to-June seasons, rather than calendar years, but it's still fun to look back on the past 12 months and relive the performances that offered extra satisfaction. Although I may have missed some great stuff along the way - it's pretty near impossible to catch everything packed into a given year - I experienced plenty of rewarding activity on the classical music and theater scenes. Here are my picks for the best performing-arts events in Baltimore during 2013.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | September 26, 2013
The Sundays at Three chamber music series is just a short drive away for Howard County residents, because its concerts are performed at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. This can be as much of an advantage for the performers as for the audience. "It's nice to be living here," acknowledges clarinetist William Jenken, who is among the performers at the season-opening concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 29. A member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1998, Jenken moved to Columbia from Baltimore in 1999.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Libby H. Younglove, a homemaker and longtime Baltimore Symphony Orchestra volunteer, died Monday from osteogenic sarcoma at her summer home in Ocean City . She was 66. The former Libby Jean Hale was born and raised in Cockeysville. After graduating from Dulaney High School in 1965, she attended the University of Maryland, College Park for two years. She was married in 1967 to Robert A. Younglove, who owns a performance coaching consulting firm. The couple have lived for many years at Ruxton Crossing in Towson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Midweek -- OK, End of Week -- Madness offers a quick spin through classical music, via Google autocomplete, via Classic FM in the UK, via Norman Lebrecht (whose blog alerted me to this crazy item in the first place).
NEWS
By Sylvia Rogers, syltrog@verizon.net | April 18, 2013
Great music has been happening at the Parkville Senior Center. On April 3, members were treated to a wonderful concert when tenor Rodrigo Garciarroyo and pianist Richard Dowling presented well-known opera and stage musical selections in the center's dining room This hourlong program, sponsored by the Baltimore County Department of Aging, was made possible by the Piatigorsky Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is...
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Baltimore radio listeners have a taste for classical music.Both WBJC-FM (91.5) and WJHU-FM (88.1), the local listener-supported stations that principally play the fine-music format, report they had their biggest audiences ever in the Arbitron ratings for the fall quarter."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 1, 1994
TOKYO -- In this city's chic Roppongi district, a record store known as The Wave is a beacon to the young, announcing its presence in neon letters 10 feet tall. Yesterday, at rush hour, as music blared from loud speakers, it was packed with fashionably dressed young men and women poring over its seemingly inexhaustible stock.It could have been a scene from any U.S. metropolis such as New York or Los Angeles -- except that the music booming through the store was Wagner's opera Tannhauser and the CDs of choice for the hip were classical, not pop.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which begins a three-week swing through Japan with a concert in Fuji tonight, is discovering on its Asia tour that there is far more interest in classical music here than in the United States, particularly among the young.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
When Meyerhoff Symphony Hall was built back in the early 1980s, there was space for a proper pipe organ to be installed, which would have made the facility even more valuable. Too bad there wasn't any money. Since then, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has had to bring in an electronic substitute whenever programming music that calls for organ. The result invariably falls short of what the real sonic deal would be like. Unless some amazing benefactor drops a whole lot of money on the hall for a pipe organ, this situation will continue.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Theater The Columbia Jewish Congregation presents "An Afternoon with Theater J" at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center, 5885 Robert Oliver Place. Theater J will present a preview of scenes from its coming production of "Andy and the Shadows," written by Ari Roth. A discussion with the actors and playwright follows the performance. Tickets are $10. Information: 443-722-7101. Children's puppet show Rainbow Theatre presents "Circus on Strings" at 10 a.m. Friday, March 8, in the Slayton House Theatre, 10400 Cross Fox Lane.
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