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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 25, 2001
It's one of the oldest, subtlest, even sexiest of instruments. It has endured periods of public disinterest and has maintained its dignity while an electric version of it has hogged the spotlight. And, unlike that plugged-in model, no one ever cavorts crazily all over a stage while playing it, or smashes it after a performance. It's the classical guitar. And it's quite a survivor. "Some of the first truly great composers wrote for it," says Ray Chester, coordinator of the guitar department at Peabody Conservatory.
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By Cathy Drinkwater Better | May 20, 2014
I was invited to join the classical guitar ensemble at the local community college. Maybe "invited" isn't exactly the right word. Two other adult classical guitar students with whom I'd performed in the past, coaxed, sweet-talked, and flattered me into joining The director tried to allay my misgivings by assuring me that the material wasn't beyond my abilities (HA! I thought.), and he promised that I'd have fun. My own instructor — apparently in on the plot—encouraged me to join.
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By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
Baltimore's growing reputation as a major center for classical guitar activity is certain to be enhanced by the excellent schedule of performances planned for the coming season.International stars of the highest caliber are slated to play a dozen concerts of great variety in almost as many sites.Highlight of the schedule will be the appearance of hometowner Manuel Barrueco as guest soloist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Jan. 15-17.Mr. Barrueco came out of his native Cuba in the 1960s to graduate and become a faculty member at the Peabody Conservatory.
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By Mike Giuliano | May 1, 2013
Columbia Pro Cantare thematically goes abroad for its concert of "Music of Spain and Latin America" on Saturday, May 4, at 8 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theater at Wilde Lake. Not only will some of this music be unfamiliar to many listeners, but it's also new for the chorus. "It's a complex program," says Columbia Pro Cantare music director Frances Motyca Dawson of a concert that includes pieces from Spain, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela and Cuba. Although Dawson's Howard County-based chorus did a Latin American program in 2008, she says the upcoming concert promises to be even "more inclusive.
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By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
The ever-rising spiral of Manuel Barrueco's career reached a high point recently when the Cuban-born classical guitarist entered a London studio to begin work on a CD with tenor Placido Domingo.On this occasion, Mr. Domingo was doing more than singing. Having recently expanded his horizons as a conductor, Mr. Domingo was leading the London Philharmonia as Mr. Barrueco performed the soulful "Concierto de Aranjuez" by Joaquin Rodrigo.The two struck an instant camaraderie, and Mr. Domingo insisted on changing plans for the rest of the disk.
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May 11, 2006
Concert Classical guitar FYI Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck's weekly column does not appear today.
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By TIM SMITH | February 23, 2006
William Kanengiser Classical guitar fans know that William Kanengiser is among the top artists in the field. A member of the noted Los Angeles Guitar Quartet, Kanengiser is also a fine soloist, with a repertoire that ranges from the baroque to the right now. He'll demonstrate that range in a recital for the Baltimore Classical Guitar Society. The concert is at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Tickets are $25 (discounts for students, seniors and society members)
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By Stephen Wigler | February 20, 1997
A goodly number of the world's classical guitar aficionados argues that Manuel Barrueco is the greatest living master of the instrument -- and, certainly, no one is greater.The Cuban-American virtuoso makes one of his rare appearances this Saturday at the Peabody Institute in a program of Bach, Schubert, Angulo, Rodrigo and Falla that no guitar fancier will want to miss.Manuel Barrueco's recital takes place Saturday evening at 8 p.min Friedberg Concert Hall (1 E. Mount Vernon Place). Tickets are $20; $15 for Baltimore Classical Guitar Society and Walters Art Gallery members; and $12 for students with ID. For tickets or for more information, call (410)
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By Judith Green | February 12, 1998
Sibling musical duos have been around since Wolfie and Nannerl Mozart, and classical guitar has its own Partridge Family in the Romeros (a father and three sons). But the Assad brothers, a classical guitar duo from Brazil, have carved a special niche for themselves.Sergio (pictured left) and Odair Assad, the sons of Middle Eastern immigrants, are acknowledged worldwide for the way they play together and the championing of new music for their versatile instruments.The Baltimore Classical Guitar Society will present the Assad Duo in a Valentine's Day concert that spotlights all their interests.
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By Mike Giuliano | May 1, 2013
Columbia Pro Cantare thematically goes abroad for its concert of "Music of Spain and Latin America" on Saturday, May 4, at 8 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theater at Wilde Lake. Not only will some of this music be unfamiliar to many listeners, but it's also new for the chorus. "It's a complex program," says Columbia Pro Cantare music director Frances Motyca Dawson of a concert that includes pieces from Spain, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela and Cuba. Although Dawson's Howard County-based chorus did a Latin American program in 2008, she says the upcoming concert promises to be even "more inclusive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
When Peabody Institute professor Manuel Barrueco received an email alerting him that he had been nominated for a prestigious fellowship carrying a five-figure cash prize, he assumed it was spam, perhaps a variation of the Nigerian lottery scam, and deleted it. When Barrueco received several follow-up emails in the ensuing weeks, he also sent them unread to his computer's trash bin. It took a phone call and the blunt question, "What are you doing?"...
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by Nash Peyton | August 2, 2011
He may have resisted it for a while, but Nash Peyton has joined the ranks of musicians such as Eddie Vedder who are embracing the ukulele. Yes, the ukulele. Nash, 20, a Loyola University student who lives in Lauraville, follows in the footsteps of his father, Don Peyton, who'll play the ukulele as part of the Happy Houligans at Creative Alliance's Mobtown Ukefest Saturday. Peyton will be out of town, but will perform at the Creative Alliance on Sept. 9. b asked Nash to tell us why he's mad about ukes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010
SUNDAY PARTICIPATION NATION OPENS: Project 20, a yearlong exhibition in four parts, begins with "Participation Nation," an exhibit of installations that invites viewers to contribute to the work's content. It includes works by Finishing School, Neighborhood Public Radio and Lee Mingwei at the Contemporary Museum, 100 W. Centre St. Suggested donation is $5 for adults, $3 for children. Call 410-783-5720 or go to contemporary.org. TIMBALAND: The Grammy Award-winning producer tours in support of his third solo work, "Shock Value II."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2008
FILM 'It's a Wonderful Life' The Senator Theatre hosts its annual benefit for the GEDCO CARES Food pantry Sunday with its traditional double-bill. You can view Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life (11 a.m., 3:45 p.m., 8:30 p.m.) either as a heartwarming tale of a well-spent life or a devastating account of an existence so miserable that only the intervention of an angel can redeem it (James Stewart, who stars, is so good it works either way). Then exult in the pathos-streaked exuberance of the premium 1951 British version of Dickens' A Christmas Carol, starring Alastair Sim as Scrooge (1:45 p.m., 6:30 p.m.)
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By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,Sun reporter | May 22, 2008
After seven seasons, the winner of American Idol is finally ready to rock. With 56 percent of the 97.5 million votes cast, David Cook, a 25-year-old bartender from Missouri, trounced David Archuleta, a 17-year-old high-schooler from Utah, to win the latest edition of TV's top-rated show. Cook choked up as host Ryan Seacrest announced the winner amid a packed house at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. "I started this season ... as the word nerd and now I'm at a loss for words," Cook said as his family joined him onstage.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 2, 2008
Meet Michael Decker, musical investigator. He already has a sterling reputation as a classical guitarist, not to mention mandolin, banjo and bouzouki player. He often performs with the Baltimore and National symphony orchestras - he's playing the banjo today with the BSO for its live film-score accompaniment to Charlie Chaplin's City Lights. And he has played in the pit bands for dozens of Broadway shows.
NEWS
November 18, 2001
Western Maryland College student musicians are gearing up for the holiday concert season, beginning with the chamber music ensembles at 7 p.m. tomorrow in (Little) Baker Chapel. Featured will be the WMC flute choir, woodwind quintet and flute quartet. WMC music lecturer Norma Hooks also will perform. Students Nicole Novotny, Jeannette Prante and Fallon Bauer will be flute soloists on Corelli's Christmas Concerto. The program includes selections from Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite, folk music, transcriptions for all three groups and original music for the woodwind quintet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007
RECITAL PULLING THE STRINGS The acoustic, classical guitar is one of the most seductive instruments in the world, and Sharon Isbin knows how to get the most out of it. The much-recorded artist will give a recital Saturday to open the Baltimore Classical Guitar Society's 20th anniversary season. Prominent contemporary composers have written works for Isbin, including three who will be featured on her Baltimore program -- Tan Dun, Leo Brouwer and John Duarte. The latter's Joan Baez Suite will find Isbin exploring arrangements of "House of the Rising Sun," "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?"
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By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,sun music critic | July 20, 2007
"My greatest love is Bach," says Baltimore filmmaker Michael Lawrence. "He has driven my life. But there hasn't been a decent film made on Bach." Lawrence plans to change that. Filming is set to start next month on a project that will focus not on the biographical side of Johann Sebastian Bach but rather on the power and genius of his music and the artists who are drawn to it. "Bach films are either stuffy, period-looking things, or they just involve going around Germany to places where he lived," Lawrence says.
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