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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
At an auto auction a few years ago, the best-selling adventure author Clive Cussler stared at a classic DeLorean and asked an acquaintance why people still seem so fascinated with the car. "I see the same thing in these cars that I see in your books," replied James Espey, vice-president of Houston-based DeLorean Motor Company, which owns the rights to the brand and restores and sells the cars. "It's just a great story." The March 19 death of visionary automaker John Z. DeLorean, best known for developing the sleek 1980s sports car with the stainless-steel skin and gull-wing doors that bore his name, marks the final chapter in one of the most riveting sagas in automotive history.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
For Greg Hudnet, being a Ravens superfan is all about the car. Not just any car, but a purple-and-black '52 Buick that Hudnet - aka Birdman - drives to every home game. Decked out with the Ravens logo, customized inside with the autographs of some 50 Ravens and Colts players, his car has become a crowd-pleaser of the first order. And even though Hudnet dresses up like a bird for every game and helps keep his fellow fans in Section 531 pumped, the retired firefighter acknowledges the car is far more famous than he is. "It's just become so popular, it's unbelievable," says Hudnet, 63, who lives in Parkton with his wife of 42 years, Linda.
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NEWS
September 17, 2006
Classic car show -- Corvette Annapolis will host a classic car showcase from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at in the parking lot of Fuddruckers, 175 Jennifer Road, Annapolis. Registration begins at 8 a.m. for vehicle entries. The event will feature entertainment, refreshments, gift bags, vendors, awards and trophies. All models of classic cars from 1981 and earlier may be entered for $15 per vehicle. Proceeds will benefit the Anne Arundel Medical Center cardiac rehabilitation program. Admission to the show is free.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Albert J. "Jay" Perry III, a financial adviser and collector of classic racing cars, died Wednesday of lung cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 62. Mr. Perry was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He was a 1966 graduate of the Gilman School and earned his pre-law degree in 1970 from Emory University in Atlanta. An Air Force veteran, he earned his law degree in the early 1970s from the University of Florida Frederic G. Levin School of Law. He was a trust officer at Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. until 1983, when he left to establish A.J. Perry & Co. Inc., a financial advisory firm in the 1000 block of St. Paul St. At the time of his death, Mr. Perry had not retired from the family-owned and -operated company.
SPORTS
December 7, 1997
Bill Bollinger has been involved in auto racing in one way or another since he was a youngster. Now, after being retired since the 1970s, the Westminster resident is back behind the wheel again racing Classic Cars.Bollinger, 52, started in racing helping Tim Harvey of Glenn Falls, then later worked with Kenny Slaybaugh who raced sprints and late models in the '50s and '60s at Lincoln Speedway in Hanover, Pa.In the '60s, Bollinger started driving his own car and found his niche in Figure-8 racing at the now defunct Dorsey Speedway in Howard County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
Gary Klein loves and loathes his classic car. He devotes half his garage, hours of free time and a good chunk of change to his yellow convertible 1975 TR6. It's British, and it's his little metal baby. The car's design - the straight lines and the boxy shell - drew him in. That's his favorite part of the car. "It's the shape," Klein said. "It's been described as a man's car, and I guess I must have fallen into that trap. It attracted me." After restoring it, Klein reached out to other British-car owners in the area.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
For Greg Hudnet, being a Ravens superfan is all about the car. Not just any car, but a purple-and-black '52 Buick that Hudnet - aka Birdman - drives to every home game. Decked out with the Ravens logo, customized inside with the autographs of some 50 Ravens and Colts players, his car has become a crowd-pleaser of the first order. And even though Hudnet dresses up like a bird for every game and helps keep his fellow fans in Section 531 pumped, the retired firefighter acknowledges the car is far more famous than he is. "It's just become so popular, it's unbelievable," says Hudnet, 63, who lives in Parkton with his wife of 42 years, Linda.
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | May 8, 1994
Archie Davis of Woodbine loves drag racing. But family, business and time constraints prevent him from racing every event. Still he enjoys it as much as a racer who never misses a program.Davis loves cars and racing. He has been around both all of his life. He attended 75-80 Dragway regularly and worked on cars with his father."I've always been a mechanic," Davis said. "I always worked on cars. My father was a mechanical engineer who did mechanical work on the side. I learned a lot doing side work with him. Then I worked as a mechanic for the Montgomery County school board while I was in high school."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 18, 2002
There are car shows, and then there are car shows. Carlisle, Pa., knows how to put on a car show. The Spring Carlisle Collector Car Swap Meet and Corral boasts 82 acres - you read that right - with 8,100 vendor spaces - it's true - on the Carlisle Fairgrounds today through Sunday. It's a car bonanza, of sorts, with car accessories, stock parts, reproduction parts, automotive literature, memorabilia and more. And then there's the Car Corral with 1,800 collector cars and trucks from all eras and in various conditions for sale.
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | December 5, 1993
Most Americans remember the first car they owned. Many have taken cars similar or identical to their first one and have rebuilt or modified them for drag racing, and others have restored the older cars as a hobby and display them in area car shows.Today, more than 300 car enthusiasts, many from Carroll County, will display their cars from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the fourth annual Classic/Antique Car Show and Flea Market in the Cow Palace at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium.The show, presented by the Street Cars of Desire Car Club, will feature cars from prewar up to 1972.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
James Synodinos, a retired electrical contractor who enjoyed collecting and driving vintage automobiles, died of cancer Sunday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 68. Mr. Synodinos was born in Baltimore and raised on Pelham Avenue in Mayfield. He was a 1958 graduate of Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, where he studied aviation mechanics. Trained as an electrician, Mr. Synodinos was a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 24. He established Synodinos and Associates, a commercial electrical contracting firm, in 1980.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Reporter | February 18, 2007
CONSIDER THE PLIGHT OF THE Empty-Nester Male: Kids out of the house, tuitions done, weekends without a list of family obligations. A man in this pitiable situation might start thinking about freedom ... about the open road ... about a new car, finally, and one that's cool. A lot of folks in the automotive industry are counting on it. At the Detroit auto show last month, Nissan introduced a concept car designed strictly for the aging baby boomer male ready to plunge deeper into his hobbies.
NEWS
September 17, 2006
Classic car show -- Corvette Annapolis will host a classic car showcase from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at in the parking lot of Fuddruckers, 175 Jennifer Road, Annapolis. Registration begins at 8 a.m. for vehicle entries. The event will feature entertainment, refreshments, gift bags, vendors, awards and trophies. All models of classic cars from 1981 and earlier may be entered for $15 per vehicle. Proceeds will benefit the Anne Arundel Medical Center cardiac rehabilitation program. Admission to the show is free.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY DOUG KAPUSTIN and PHOTOS BY DOUG KAPUSTIN,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 3, 2005
A throwback to the 1940s and '50s, the Cadillac Parade and Royal Theater Music Festival was revived for the ninth year Saturday. The original Cadillac Parade was a major event in the city's black community, in which Baltimoreans would ride along or watch as Cadillacs cruised down Pennsylvania Avenue. Before the 1960s, The Avenue was a center of commerce and night life, home to the Royal Theater, the Lucky Number Club and the exclusive Sphinx Club. Jazz greats including Cab Calloway, Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong and John Coltrane performed here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
Gary Klein loves and loathes his classic car. He devotes half his garage, hours of free time and a good chunk of change to his yellow convertible 1975 TR6. It's British, and it's his little metal baby. The car's design - the straight lines and the boxy shell - drew him in. That's his favorite part of the car. "It's the shape," Klein said. "It's been described as a man's car, and I guess I must have fallen into that trap. It attracted me." After restoring it, Klein reached out to other British-car owners in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
At an auto auction a few years ago, the best-selling adventure author Clive Cussler stared at a classic DeLorean and asked an acquaintance why people still seem so fascinated with the car. "I see the same thing in these cars that I see in your books," replied James Espey, vice-president of Houston-based DeLorean Motor Company, which owns the rights to the brand and restores and sells the cars. "It's just a great story." The March 19 death of visionary automaker John Z. DeLorean, best known for developing the sleek 1980s sports car with the stainless-steel skin and gull-wing doors that bore his name, marks the final chapter in one of the most riveting sagas in automotive history.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Roy Kidwell won't have to keep an eye on a sirloin steak sizzling on his barbecue grill this Independence Day.Instead, the Chartwell resident will be watching a kitchen wall clock installed in a 1934 Dodge rumble seat coupe and helping to keep his race team on time.Mr. Kidwell and five other Maryland residents will be participating in the Interstate Batteries Great North American Race, a road-rally-style contest for pre-World War II automobiles.This year the course runs from Toronto to Mexico City.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
The 1958 Chevrolet Impala rumbled like a cabin cruiser and shot from its tailpipes two 6-foot plumes of fire. The crowd of car freaks gathered around the garage on Mountain Road in Pasadena seemed pleased, and Dallas Cooper got out from the behind the wheel as the fuel vapor stink rose into the breeze.Impressive. But what sort of gasoline mileage does it get?"Who worries about that?" Cooper said.You don't discuss mileage around here. Around here you find solace in history's rear-view mirror, the one adorned with the big fuzzy dice.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
Hundreds of vendors, car owners and enthusiasts converged on Churchville this weekend for the eighth annual Big M Spring Bash. The car show is held every May on a field behind Kroh's Nursery, next to the Big M property on Route 22. The Big M restaurant is part of the Bel Air Drive-In. The restaurant, which has been in business for 42 years, sponsors car shows from April to November. The spring bash also includes musical performances and a fireworks display that was scheduled for last night.
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