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NEWS
October 25, 2011
I couldn't have agreed more when Dan Rodricks stated the Wall Street protesters didn't start class warfare ("Occupiers didn't start the class warfare," Oct. 23), but I sure know who did. That well-deserved honor goes to our current, illustrious President Barack Obama. His presidency is so bogged down by failures and wrong choices (despite his recent arrogant claim that every choice he's made has been the right one) that his only hope of being re-elected lies in his ability to pit one against the other.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 22, 2011
Nobody asked me, but I'll bet cash money that half the people who complain about Occupy Wall Street/Occupy Baltimore and ridicule the protesters didn't vote in the last election and never took part in a public demonstration of any kind. And those who decry "class warfare" from high atop their millions can't make it go away by doing so. That's what we have after 30 years of generally stagnant wages for the middle class, matched against the largest concentration of wealth in the nation's history, and accompanied by the highest level of poverty since the government started measuring it. As my friend Donna says, "It is what it is," and Americans are finally starting to complain about it. -o- Nobody asked me, but why are we still playing this game?
NEWS
October 1, 2011
Why is it that when I send my money out to work, it is taxed at a lower rate than when I go to work? Recent discussions of marginal tax rates, limits on deductions, and class warfare miss that essential question about our personal (not corporate) taxes. Some argue that capital fuels our economy and that taxing dividends or gains at all is a disincentive to investment. I would suggest the opposite. When a corporation (and nearly all job generating businesses are) generates profits, it can reinvest or pay out to shareholders.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | June 30, 2011
President Barack Obama's news conference Wednesday - his first in 15 weeks - made clear his strategy for reelection is the same old clarion call for class warfare, pitting the evil rich against the saintly poor. "I think it's only fair," said the president, "to ask an oil company or a corporate jet owner that's doing so well to give up that tax break. …I don't think that's so radical. " In fact, he mentioned "corporate jet owners" half a dozen times during his appearance.
NEWS
February 18, 2011
While it is true that the U.S. government and the states compete in a global market and must keep the costs of their goods and services as low as possible in order to compete profitably, the question is what our federal and state tax rates should be as a percentage of GDP, compared with the other developed countries, in order to assure such profit. This question is important because we need to raise revenue to reduce the federal and state deficits while not stifling the economy by excessive taxes in the present and precluding economic growth in the future.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 19, 2010
The 2009 census shows that one in seven Americans now live below the government's laughable poverty line for a family of four: $21,954. (How many more families of four live between $21,955 and, say, $31,954 a year? Are they not impoverished?) More than 20 percent of all children are poor. We have not seen these levels since the 1960s. Recession and the loss of millions of American jobs in the last three years have been cited as the reasons for the recent rise in poverty. But there's a lot more to it than that.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Finally, a sign that Congressional Republicans may have some flexibility after all. House Minority Leader John A. Boehner's recent disclosure that he'd be willing to vote for President Barack Obama's proposed tax break for families earning $250,000 or less demonstrates that a compromise over Bush-era tax policy is possible. It appears Mr. Boehner has recognized that outrage and extremism only gets you so far. The GOP's all-or-nothing approach to tax cuts — reminiscent of the party's oppose-at-all-costs philosophy toward the president's agenda generally — wasn't going to play well with working class Americans.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 25, 2010
Over all the years since the Reagan administration, whenever I mentioned the ever-widening gap between rich and poor, and between the rich and the middle, certain people in the room threw the class warfare flag, marched off a 15-yard penalty and accused me of making stuff up. And it was always Republicans, conservative independents, or self-described libertarians who complained -- pretty much the same people who now stand on the wrong side of...
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