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NEWS
October 24, 2008
Wealthy already pay lion's share of taxes In his column "It's a 30-year sneak attack in America's class war" (Oct. 19), Dan Rodricks continues the propaganda of misinformation by the media and Democrats that suggests the wealthy are not paying their fair share of taxes. According to the Tax Foundation, in 2006, taxpayers with incomes of $153,000 and greater (the top 5 percent of earners) paid 60 percent of all federal individual income taxes. The top 1 percent (with incomes greater than $388,000)
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NEWS
October 24, 2008
Wealthy already pay lion's share of taxes In his column "It's a 30-year sneak attack in America's class war" (Oct. 19), Dan Rodricks continues the propaganda of misinformation by the media and Democrats that suggests the wealthy are not paying their fair share of taxes. According to the Tax Foundation, in 2006, taxpayers with incomes of $153,000 and greater (the top 5 percent of earners) paid 60 percent of all federal individual income taxes. The top 1 percent (with incomes greater than $388,000)
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NEWS
By Milton Bates | February 12, 2002
I want to see Enron survive ... preserving value for our creditors and hard-working employees. Unfortunately, with the multiple ... investigations that currently require much of my time, it is increasingly difficult to concentrate fully on what is most important to Enron's stakeholders. - Kenneth Lay AND SO falls a mighty oak in America's corporate forest. These poignant words, explaining his resignation as chief executive of the company he so lovingly shepherded from obscurity to the nation's seventh-largest, illuminate the speaker and inspire the reader.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Maintaining a tradition that has been around since at least the Reagan Revolution, John McCain the other night ridiculed the idea of "spreading the wealth" and accused Barack Obama of playing "class warfare." This is the tired Republican knee-jerk that occurs whenever someone in the room - Democrat or independent, academic researcher or nonpartisan think-tank thinker - raises the unsettling issue of income disparity in the United States. Republicans throw the "class warfare" flag whenever somebody gets too close to the story of America in the nearly 30 years since Ronald Reagan brought us trickle-down economics.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | March 14, 1995
Washington. -- On March 31, President Bill Clinton will travel to Haiti to congratulate U.S. forces for their occupation of Haiti and meet with Haiti's President Jean- Bertrand Aristide.That day the United States will pass command and control of Haiti to a U.N. force of whom some 3,000 will be American troops. These are ominous indications that the mission designed as ''restoring democracy'' to Haiti is far from complete.Readers of this column may recall that I did not support the U.S. landing in Haiti nor the preceding economic embargoes, which destroyed much of Haiti's fragile economy.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | January 19, 1993
Los Angeles. -- Together again, Ronald Reagan and Georg Bush, who ran the United States for 12 years, patted each other on the back last Wednesday at the White House.The 41st president gave the 40th president the Medal of Freedom and the 40th gave a short speech about what they had accomplished.''Together we got the government off the backs of the American people,'' said Mr. Reagan. ''We created millions of new jobs and showed a watching world the power of free enterprise. . . . Together, we did make a better future.
NEWS
July 20, 1995
Communism will fail in Vietnam, tooI take exception to Sandy Grady's column "Clinton right to end the longest war" (July 13).I will grant that it was a courageous thing for the president to do. But I can see no benefit that will accrue to the United States, only to communist Vietnam.If "we need Vietnam" as a counter against China, as Mr. Grady alleges, then the U.S. truly is a paper tiger with no clout of its own.What I object to most, however, is his incorrect assertion that "Vietnam was a class war" in which the poor, whom he described as "grunts," were sent to fight in rice paddies while "the rich or well-connected could hire lawyers, rig the system, stay in school."
NEWS
By JONATHAN ALTER | July 25, 1995
New York -- I'm a part of this so-called overclass -- and so are my bosses and many of my colleagues at Newsweek and elsewhere in the national media.There's no point in denying it.Whether by birth, effort, ability, luck or some combination, we are more successful and have more options than most Americans, and that inevitably pulls us away from the lives they lead.Neither eating pork rinds (George Bush) nor boasting of humble origins (Bill Clinton) can erase that fact for politicians any more than it can for the rest of the overprivileged.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 22, 1998
"Cloudsplitter," by Russell Banks. HarperFlamingo. 768 pages. $27.50.Russell Bank's extraordinary new novel, "Cloudsplitter," recounts the story of radical abolitionist John Brown from the perspective of his son Owen, 30 years after Bleeding Kansas and the raid on the federal weapons manufactory at Harpers Ferry. Far surpassing Toni Morrison's works on this subject, it is the most important novel about race published in America since William Faulkner's "The Sound And The Fury.""Was my father mad?"
NEWS
By TRB | May 23, 1991
Washington. -- Having jilted Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan's idea for a Social Security tax cut, Democrats have a new chance to get on the right side of the tax issue with a proposal from Rep. Tom Downey and Sen. Al Gore. The ''Working Family Tax Relief Act'' (or the ''Family Security and Tax Relief Act''? Mr. Gore's press release has it both ways), it would replace the personal income-tax exemption for children, currently $2,300, with an $800 tax credit per child.Unlike an exemption, which is worth more to people in higher brackets, a dollar-for-dollar tax credit is worth the same to everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun Staff | June 13, 2004
The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising, by Robert Shogan. Westview Press. 304 pages. $26. The Battle of Blair Mountain was almost cataclysmic. Now, it's almost famous. Robert Shogan's book is a startling reminder that, in the not-so-distant past in this country, "class warfare" could be not rhetorical but literal, and labor-management relations might well be conducted at gunpoint. Shogan describes a time when a coal miner worked "drilling and blasting, crawling through blackness, sweating on his knees as he shoveled coal into waiting carts," for a top scale of $4.52 a day. The miners were determined to organize a union and force the owners to bargain over pay and working conditions.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2003
With a color-coded map of the Middle East projected onto the classroom wall, pupils in Greg Nelson's eighth-grade social studies class learned that Iraq is about the size of Texas with less than a tenth of the United States' population. They answered fill-in-the-blank questions about Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's possible links to terrorism. And they used a drawing on a class handout to rate their support for a U.S.-led invasion, marking a spectrum to show whether their views fall closer to the olive branch on the far left or to the bundle of arrows on the right.
NEWS
By Milton Bates | February 12, 2002
I want to see Enron survive ... preserving value for our creditors and hard-working employees. Unfortunately, with the multiple ... investigations that currently require much of my time, it is increasingly difficult to concentrate fully on what is most important to Enron's stakeholders. - Kenneth Lay AND SO falls a mighty oak in America's corporate forest. These poignant words, explaining his resignation as chief executive of the company he so lovingly shepherded from obscurity to the nation's seventh-largest, illuminate the speaker and inspire the reader.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 22, 1998
"Cloudsplitter," by Russell Banks. HarperFlamingo. 768 pages. $27.50.Russell Bank's extraordinary new novel, "Cloudsplitter," recounts the story of radical abolitionist John Brown from the perspective of his son Owen, 30 years after Bleeding Kansas and the raid on the federal weapons manufactory at Harpers Ferry. Far surpassing Toni Morrison's works on this subject, it is the most important novel about race published in America since William Faulkner's "The Sound And The Fury.""Was my father mad?"
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
"Gattaca" is a film that makes you want to comb your hair, check your heart rate and contemplate plastic surgery. Filled with genetically perfect people, it's enough to make DNA-challenged movie critics nervous.That, of course, is the point. Andrew Niccol's compelling "Gattaca" is about "the not-too-distant future," when most babies' genetics are predetermined. Babies conceived by chance grow up to be part of "the new underclass," whose genes contain flaws that automatically disqualify them from the most prestigious jobs.
NEWS
By JONATHAN ALTER | July 25, 1995
New York -- I'm a part of this so-called overclass -- and so are my bosses and many of my colleagues at Newsweek and elsewhere in the national media.There's no point in denying it.Whether by birth, effort, ability, luck or some combination, we are more successful and have more options than most Americans, and that inevitably pulls us away from the lives they lead.Neither eating pork rinds (George Bush) nor boasting of humble origins (Bill Clinton) can erase that fact for politicians any more than it can for the rest of the overprivileged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun Staff | June 13, 2004
The Battle of Blair Mountain: The Story of America's Largest Labor Uprising, by Robert Shogan. Westview Press. 304 pages. $26. The Battle of Blair Mountain was almost cataclysmic. Now, it's almost famous. Robert Shogan's book is a startling reminder that, in the not-so-distant past in this country, "class warfare" could be not rhetorical but literal, and labor-management relations might well be conducted at gunpoint. Shogan describes a time when a coal miner worked "drilling and blasting, crawling through blackness, sweating on his knees as he shoveled coal into waiting carts," for a top scale of $4.52 a day. The miners were determined to organize a union and force the owners to bargain over pay and working conditions.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Maintaining a tradition that has been around since at least the Reagan Revolution, John McCain the other night ridiculed the idea of "spreading the wealth" and accused Barack Obama of playing "class warfare." This is the tired Republican knee-jerk that occurs whenever someone in the room - Democrat or independent, academic researcher or nonpartisan think-tank thinker - raises the unsettling issue of income disparity in the United States. Republicans throw the "class warfare" flag whenever somebody gets too close to the story of America in the nearly 30 years since Ronald Reagan brought us trickle-down economics.
NEWS
July 20, 1995
Communism will fail in Vietnam, tooI take exception to Sandy Grady's column "Clinton right to end the longest war" (July 13).I will grant that it was a courageous thing for the president to do. But I can see no benefit that will accrue to the United States, only to communist Vietnam.If "we need Vietnam" as a counter against China, as Mr. Grady alleges, then the U.S. truly is a paper tiger with no clout of its own.What I object to most, however, is his incorrect assertion that "Vietnam was a class war" in which the poor, whom he described as "grunts," were sent to fight in rice paddies while "the rich or well-connected could hire lawyers, rig the system, stay in school."
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | March 14, 1995
Washington. -- On March 31, President Bill Clinton will travel to Haiti to congratulate U.S. forces for their occupation of Haiti and meet with Haiti's President Jean- Bertrand Aristide.That day the United States will pass command and control of Haiti to a U.N. force of whom some 3,000 will be American troops. These are ominous indications that the mission designed as ''restoring democracy'' to Haiti is far from complete.Readers of this column may recall that I did not support the U.S. landing in Haiti nor the preceding economic embargoes, which destroyed much of Haiti's fragile economy.
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