Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClass Size
IN THE NEWS

Class Size

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By HAROLD JACKSON | February 14, 1999
THERE'S nothing like the excitement that occurs when understanding conquers ignorance. But spontaneous knowledge is most frequently achieved when class size allows a teacher to give a child some personal attention during the day.That fact is reflected in the numerous favorite-teacher stories concerning a moment of catharsis when the mind is honed by an instructor who took the time to work one-on-one.It's easier to instruct when a teacher isn't overworked. Finding the time for individual instruction is difficult when classes are large and include students with collateral problems that affect learning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | May 25, 2014
I've been thinking a lot about college lately. It's not as though it's staring me in the face, either. The oldest is finishing his freshman year in high school. The youngest is still in elementary school. Still, what's occurring on America's college campuses is on my front burner. First and foremost is the ever-escalating cost of a four-year degree - the cause of many a sleepless night for moms and dads. Tuition, fees, room and board for many private colleges has now hit $60,000 a year.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
Anne Arundel County voters made it very clear during last fall's elections that they wanted more attention paid and major improvement made to their schools.So Shirley Murphy, one of the new County Council members that voters swept into office, has spent the past month researching what the 13 schools in her district of Pasadena need most. She's wandered school halls, talked to teachers and met with parents at every building. She says she found some good, some bad and some surprising things.
SPORTS
September 22, 2013
Perry Hall MSSA Monday, Sept. 23: The regular monthly meeting of the Perry Hall chapter of Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Gunpowder Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10067 at 6309 Ebenezer Road. Visitors are welcome. Call Joe Zinner at 410-256-5641 for details. Bliss on the Bay Saturday, Sept. 28: Bliss on the Bay, a benefit for HopeWell Cancer Support, will run 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Ultimate Watersports at the Hammerman Beach Area of Gunpowder Falls State Park in Middle River.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | March 16, 2011
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is a smart man. Arguably, he has been the most effective person to ever hold that office, charting a bold national course of school reform. But he said a really dumb thing recently. In a talk to the National Governors Association, as reported by The New York Times, he said that he would prefer to put his own school-age children in a classroom with 28 students led by a "fantastic" teacher than in one with 23 students and a "mediocre" teacher.
NEWS
May 19, 2012
Imagine how my members feel about the latest press release from Baltimore County Public Schools about class size that states, "Baltimore County Public Schools' class sizes compare favorably with state, national averages. " The misleading information was not in The Sun, but in that press release. Try and explain that information to the multitude of high school teachers who have over 30 students in their classes ("Crowded classrooms," May 15). This song has been sung for decades when describing class sizes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Baltimore County's decision to cut nearly 200 teaching positions last year has had far-reaching consequences in high schools, where hundreds of classes have been dropped from the rolls, leaving many more students packed into classrooms. At Dulaney High School, for example, a chemistry teacher with a class of 34 said his students must take turns doing lab experiments because the stations are too small to accommodate more than three or four at a time. A journalism teacher doesn't have enough computers for each of her budding writers, so she sends part of the class to the library to do the work.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Class sizes would rise in Baltimore County next school year under Superintendent Joe A. Hairston's budget proposal, which includes a freeze on filling about 200 vacant teaching positions, even as the system experiences a surge in enrollment. Hairston, who presented his plan to the school board Wednesday night, is also proposing a 5 percent decrease in central office and individual school budgets that would require principals to cut back on purchasing supplies and equipment. Hairston's $1.2 billion operating budget for the fiscal year beginning in July would increase over last year by $6.5 million, or 0.5 percent.
NEWS
May 27, 1998
The New York Times said in an editorial May 25:PRESIDENT Clinton's initiative to spend $12 billion over seven years to reduce class sizes in first through third grade will provide needed federal support to states trying for smaller classes in the primary grades. The plan, as introduced in the House, would pay for 100,000 new teachers. The investment is small, but the impact could be substantial if that money is directed, as Clinton proposes, to reducing class size to an average of 18 students.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | December 11, 1992
Average class sizes in Carroll County showed little chang from last year, going down slightly at the elementary and high school levels, up slightly in middle schools.Deputy Superintendent Brian Lockard presented the report to the Board of Education on Wednesday.The average elementary class size by Sept. 30 was 24.89 students, down from last year's 25.03. However, fewer classes have 30 or more students -- 58 this year, compared with 62 last year.In middle school, academic classes averaged 28 students per class, up a bit from 27.9 last year.
NEWS
May 19, 2012
Imagine how my members feel about the latest press release from Baltimore County Public Schools about class size that states, "Baltimore County Public Schools' class sizes compare favorably with state, national averages. " The misleading information was not in The Sun, but in that press release. Try and explain that information to the multitude of high school teachers who have over 30 students in their classes ("Crowded classrooms," May 15). This song has been sung for decades when describing class sizes.
NEWS
May 17, 2012
As The Sun correctly points out ("Crowded classrooms," May 15), classroom overcrowding has developed because of decisions authorized by Baltimore County's school board, and we appreciate The Sun's investigative reporting and analysis of this problem. Unfortunately, it is unlikely the board would have ever raised this issue or brought it the public's attention. In fact, The Sun reported that "Donald Peccia, the head of human resources for county schools, said he was not aware of the number of classes with 30 or more students.
NEWS
May 17, 2012
Baltimore County schools spokesman Charles Herndon told The Sun there is no empirical evidence that class size is linked to student achievement ("Smaller Balto. Co. class sizes urged," May 150). But if that's true, then why did officials limit class sizes at the lowest-performing high schools, where smaller classes were deemed important for struggling students? The answer is that they, like everyone else other than maybe Mr. Herndon, recognize the simple truth that bigger classes make it harder for students to learn.
NEWS
May 16, 2012
I have attended Towson High School for four years, and the change in class size this year was a dramatic shift. Your recent article made clear how cutting 200 high school teachers in the Baltimore County School System has negatively affected students and teachers ("Baltimore County high schools see class sizes grow," May 12). Thirty-two percent of classes have more than 30 students this year, a 22 percent increase in one year. This will not only make it hard for students to get individualized attention, but the classes will also become more challenging for teachers.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
Baltimore County parents and legislators will ask incoming schools Superintendent Dallas Dance to consider putting more teachers in high schools, where class sizes have swelled since positions were eliminated a year ago. Maryland Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said he wants Dance to examine restoring positions at high schools, where hundreds of classes have been dropped, soon after Dance takes over July 1. He said he warned county...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Baltimore County's decision to cut nearly 200 teaching positions last year has had far-reaching consequences in high schools, where hundreds of classes have been dropped from the rolls, leaving many more students packed into classrooms. At Dulaney High School, for example, a chemistry teacher with a class of 34 said his students must take turns doing lab experiments because the stations are too small to accommodate more than three or four at a time. A journalism teacher doesn't have enough computers for each of her budding writers, so she sends part of the class to the library to do the work.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Armed with new statistics on class size, the Maryland State Teachers Association called yesterday for fewer students in every classroom, and as few as 15 in kindergarten through third grade.The state's first survey of classroom teachers shows that the average class size in public schools is slightly more than 27 students across all grades, said association president Karl Pence at a news conference in Annapolis. The poll was requested by the Governor's Commission on Education.Prince George's County has the largest classes, with an average of 29.3 students, and St. Mary's County the smallest, with 25 students per class.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Jim Brochin, a Democrat who has been knocking on doors in central Baltimore County for 2 1/2 years as part of an effort to unseat state Sen. Andrew P. Harris, officially announced his candidacy yesterday. Both men said they plan to run on Harris' record -- he is Baltimore County's only Republican senator and one of the most conservative members of that chamber. As such, he is often on the losing side of votes in the General Assembly. Brochin, 38, of Towson, said he believes voters will reject Harris if they know his record on key education, environmental and public health issues.
NEWS
Liz Bowie | May 11, 2012
Dulaney High School parent Jean Suda came before the Baltimore County school board this winter to say the class sizes at her child's school had grown significantly this year. She had assembled some handmade charts, drilling down as far as the data she had would allow to document what had happened after the county decided to cut 196 teaching positions. The Sun decided to take her work a step further, and asked the county school system for a list of every high school class that was offered this school year and last. We wanted to see just how many classes had gotten bigger.
EXPLORE
February 25, 2012
WESTMINSTER - Carroll County Public Schools Superintendent Steve Guthrie this week sent parents an email urging them to contact legislators to fight a state proposal by Gov.Martin O'Malley to shift a portion teacher pension costs to counties. In the email, Guthrie said the move could impose an addition $7 million obligation to the county. Currently, county school systems across the state negotiate contracts with teachers and pay Social Security costs, but the state pays for pension costs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.