Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClass Clown
IN THE NEWS

Class Clown

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Grobaty and Tim Grobaty,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 11, 1992
Today's lesson is on the Class Clown, so no screwing around. Just pay attention or we'll paddle your bee-hind from here to the vice principal's office, pally.There are -- write this down -- two kinds of class clowns. The most common is the blabbermouth buffoon, who only bags the "clown" title by virtue of disrupting everything. Rarer is the genuinely funny class clown, the one who picks his spots and depends on timing to get his humor across.Both kinds are featured in tonight's sweeps-month special "Class Clowns," at 10 on ABC (Channel 13 in Baltimore)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
While growing up in a well-to-do Richmond, Va., family, Rob Levit never knew quite what to do with the surge of energy he often felt racing through him like a current. He hadn't mastered an instrument or learned to paint. He had no hankering to write. So he did the only thing he could think of. He became the class clown. "I was always getting in trouble," says Levit, 44, an improvisational jazz guitarist with 15 music CDs and an international performing career to his credit.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 24, 2008
For many who came of age in the 1970s, listening to the edgy comedy of George Carlin (ruled indecent but not obscene by the Supreme Court) was an important coming-of-age experience. Like Lenny Bruce a decade earlier, the pony-tailed Mr. Carlin pushed the envelope of humor with profanity, frank discussions of drugs and his Irish Catholic upbringing, and an unapologetically anti-establishment point of view. His "Seven Dirty Words" routine would seem fairly tame by today's standards, but it was groundbreaking then.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
Go see Doug Stanhope at the Ottobar on Friday night, and chances are you'll be angered, outraged, maybe even ticked off beyond all sense of reason. With luck, you'll laugh, too. He is, after all, the comic whose profile in a 2006 issue of British GQ was headlined, "Is This America's Most Depraved Man?" As a comic, he's following in the footsteps of such angry young men as Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, Bill Hicks and Lewis Black, ignoring conventions of good taste, cracking jokes about things both hallowed and profane, never meeting a sacred cow he didn't want to gore.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
Larry Brown enjoyed being the class clown."To be honest with you, it was kind of fun," Larry recalls. "Sometimes the class would be quiet and I would just say something."But I never thought I would get in any serious trouble. I never thought I would get put out," Larry adds.Two years ago, Larry's antics resulted in his suspension from Bates Middle School in Annapolis. But he was allowed to re-enter the eighth grade at Adams Park Learning Center.The learning center was created for middle school students who have been suspended from other Anne Arundel County schools and are one step from expulsion.
FEATURES
By Joanne Weintraub and Joanne Weintraub,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 15, 2003
Just a few minutes into the pilot of hip-hop star Eve's foray into comedy, her character goes out to a club and quickly gets herself stuck to a handsome guy. Literally stuck, dress fabric to pants zipper, her shapely behind to his manly crotch. So stuck that they have to wiggle into the ladies room together to get unstuck - followed, for some reason, by a parade of their friends. This doesn't tell you everything you need to know about Eve, but it tells you a lot. The singer plays Shelly Williams, just out of college and establishing a new clothing design business with two friends, the comfortably married Janie (Natalie Desselle-Reid, For Your Love)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
Go see Doug Stanhope at the Ottobar on Friday night, and chances are you'll be angered, outraged, maybe even ticked off beyond all sense of reason. With luck, you'll laugh, too. He is, after all, the comic whose profile in a 2006 issue of British GQ was headlined, "Is This America's Most Depraved Man?" As a comic, he's following in the footsteps of such angry young men as Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, Bill Hicks and Lewis Black, ignoring conventions of good taste, cracking jokes about things both hallowed and profane, never meeting a sacred cow he didn't want to gore.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | June 24, 2008
He was cool. He was smart. He was dirty. And he was relentlessly funny. Speaking of dead people - the very words the man used in a recent routine on death - George Carlin died Sunday in California. That doesn't sound right or is the least bit funny, but if anyone could riff on death, it was Carlin. No subject was taboo - particularly taboo subjects, such as religion, drugs, sex and death, and sometimes in that order. His trail-brazing social commentary spanned more than four decades, forced a Supreme Court decision on broadcast indecency, and influenced top-shelf comedians such as Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld and Jon Stewart.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
Andre Gardner is a testament to the value of persistence, and the rewards have been just short of perfect. The 19-year-old, fifth-year senior at Towson High was academically eligible only once in his first four years of high school. That was at the end of last spring, when the right-handed pitcher went 2-0. Gardner needed another year to graduate, and since he wouldn't turn 19 until this past October, he was eligible to play. Now, he has turned his life around. In the classroom, his grades are in order, and he's on course to graduate and go to college.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Age (73) is no barrier to mastery for Joe AmrheinJoe Amrhein gets a real kick out of his favorite pastime.Perhaps all karate instructors do, but how many are teaching the martial arts at age 73?"
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | June 24, 2008
He was cool. He was smart. He was dirty. And he was relentlessly funny. Speaking of dead people - the very words the man used in a recent routine on death - George Carlin died Sunday in California. That doesn't sound right or is the least bit funny, but if anyone could riff on death, it was Carlin. No subject was taboo - particularly taboo subjects, such as religion, drugs, sex and death, and sometimes in that order. His trail-brazing social commentary spanned more than four decades, forced a Supreme Court decision on broadcast indecency, and influenced top-shelf comedians such as Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld and Jon Stewart.
NEWS
June 24, 2008
For many who came of age in the 1970s, listening to the edgy comedy of George Carlin (ruled indecent but not obscene by the Supreme Court) was an important coming-of-age experience. Like Lenny Bruce a decade earlier, the pony-tailed Mr. Carlin pushed the envelope of humor with profanity, frank discussions of drugs and his Irish Catholic upbringing, and an unapologetically anti-establishment point of view. His "Seven Dirty Words" routine would seem fairly tame by today's standards, but it was groundbreaking then.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 29, 2006
I wouldn't mind writing only 12 inches today, rather than the usual 20. That also would make my detractors pretty happy, I'm guessing. I'd like to have paid just $2.50 for the scone and coffee I picked up yesterday morning, rather than the $4.16 the guy at the register charged me. If you can figure out the math in those two real-life examples, take a moment to thank your teachers. For the rest of you, in honor of the yesterday's start of the school year, I will give you the answer: I was imagining living my day at the 60 percent level.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
Two actors are on stage. They have no idea what their lines are or what scene is taking place and no props to give them clues. The audience is asked for location ideas. Gettysburg is chosen. Action. "Even though I know it's a re-enactment, you get out there and kill all them rebels," said Mike Sachs, a member of Yo' Mama's Cookin', an improvisational comedy troupe that performs at Howard Community College, during a skit called "Two Person Speed Up." His scene partner, Kristen Burke, smiled as she took her place, kneeling down with an imaginary gun in her hand.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 2, 2003
There's nothing simple about The Simple Life, Fox TV's new reality series about two Beverly Hills jet-setters who move in with a farm family in the Ozarks. The show, which stars wealthy party girls Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie and premieres tonight, could be described as a reality-TV version of CBS' Green Acres, the 1965 sitcom about a Manhattan attorney (Eddie Albert) and his socialite wife (Eva Gabor) who move to a ramshackle farm outside the fictional town of Hooterville. Or it could be viewed as yet another reality TV series featuring whacked-out celebrities such as The Osbournes or The Anna Nicole Show.
FEATURES
By Joanne Weintraub and Joanne Weintraub,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 15, 2003
Just a few minutes into the pilot of hip-hop star Eve's foray into comedy, her character goes out to a club and quickly gets herself stuck to a handsome guy. Literally stuck, dress fabric to pants zipper, her shapely behind to his manly crotch. So stuck that they have to wiggle into the ladies room together to get unstuck - followed, for some reason, by a parade of their friends. This doesn't tell you everything you need to know about Eve, but it tells you a lot. The singer plays Shelly Williams, just out of college and establishing a new clothing design business with two friends, the comfortably married Janie (Natalie Desselle-Reid, For Your Love)
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 29, 2006
I wouldn't mind writing only 12 inches today, rather than the usual 20. That also would make my detractors pretty happy, I'm guessing. I'd like to have paid just $2.50 for the scone and coffee I picked up yesterday morning, rather than the $4.16 the guy at the register charged me. If you can figure out the math in those two real-life examples, take a moment to thank your teachers. For the rest of you, in honor of the yesterday's start of the school year, I will give you the answer: I was imagining living my day at the 60 percent level.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | July 28, 1993
PLEASE deliver a message from me to all those young men involved in stealing cars," Myra Green said. "Tell them to find something more constructive to do with their time."
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
Andre Gardner is a testament to the value of persistence, and the rewards have been just short of perfect. The 19-year-old, fifth-year senior at Towson High was academically eligible only once in his first four years of high school. That was at the end of last spring, when the right-handed pitcher went 2-0. Gardner needed another year to graduate, and since he wouldn't turn 19 until this past October, he was eligible to play. Now, he has turned his life around. In the classroom, his grades are in order, and he's on course to graduate and go to college.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | July 28, 1993
PLEASE deliver a message from me to all those young men involved in stealing cars," Myra Green said. "Tell them to find something more constructive to do with their time."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.