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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A federal judge authorized a class-action suit Wednesday against one of the state's largest real estate groups, after a Howard County couple accused it of running a half-million dollar kickback scheme with a title insurance company. A suit filed in Baltimore by home buyers Christine and Patrick Baehr alleges The Creig Northrop Team, which has offices across central Maryland, of illegally accepting payments from Lakeview Title in exchange for sending the firm business. "We are pleased with the court's ruling, and we will continue to to vigorously prosecute this class action on behalf of our clients," said the couple's attorney, Gregory T. Lawrence of Baltimore law firm Conti Fenn & Lawrence.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan | April 7, 2014
The former owner of St. Joseph Medical Center has agreed to pay up to $37 million to resolve allegations that cardiologist Mark G. Midei put hundreds of patients through unnecessary heart stent procedures, according to court documents. As many as 273 patients stand to get payments of at least $134,000 before lawyers' and other fees. The settlement represents a major step toward resolution after more than four years of court fights that began when St. Joseph informed hundreds of people that their surgeries might not have been needed.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Citing a severe and chronic backlog, advocacy groups have filed a class-action lawsuit accusing the state of failing low-income and disabled Marylanders by regularly taking nearly a year to approve medical assistance applications. The lawsuit, filed last week in Baltimore Circuit Court on behalf of nearly 10,000 disabled adults, seeks to force the Department of Human Resources to approve the Medicaid applications within 60 days, as required by state law. The advocates allege that nearly 46 percent of applications in 2012 were illegally delayed.
BUSINESS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A federal judge authorized a class-action suit Wednesday against one of the state's largest real estate groups, after a Howard County couple accused it of running a half-million dollar kickback scheme with a title insurance company. A suit filed in Baltimore by home buyers Christine and Patrick Baehr alleges The Creig Northrop Team, which has offices across central Maryland, of illegally accepting payments from Lakeview Title in exchange for sending the firm business. "We are pleased with the court's ruling, and we will continue to to vigorously prosecute this class action on behalf of our clients," said the couple's attorney, Gregory T. Lawrence of Baltimore law firm Conti Fenn & Lawrence.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | March 31, 2009
A Harford County judge heard arguments Monday on whether a lawsuit over a vapor leak at an Exxon gas station in Fallston should proceed as a class-action case. The Peter G. Angelos law firm filed the lawsuit as a class action on behalf of about 150 families and businesses whose wells were contaminated by the gasoline additive MTBE. Lawyers for Exxon Mobil Corp. and the operator of the station contended that the plaintiffs should be required to file individual lawsuits. In arguing for class-action status, plaintiffs' lawyers said their clients shared a common interest in the leak, which residents learned about in 2004.
NEWS
By Edwin McDowell and Edwin McDowell,New York Times News Service HC dPB | August 8, 1991
A federal district judge in Atlanta yesterday converted an antitrust lawsuit against nine airlines into a class action that could benefit millions of domestic passengers and cost the carriers hundreds of millions of dollars.In decreeing a class-action suit requested by the plaintiffs, dTC Judge Marvin Shoob of U.S. District Court in Atlanta certified that all passengers who traveled between Jan. 1, 1988, and the present on the carriers were entitled to sue the companies as a group.The antitrust suit charges the airlines and the company that operates their computerized clearinghouse for listing airfares with conspiring to keep ticket prices artificially high at 23 hubs -- the airports to which the carriers funnel many of their connecting flights.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 8, 1996
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge yesterday certified as a class action a lawsuit against the city's cable television franchise that contends that the company's late-payment fees are a ruse to charge more for cable than regulations allow.Three plaintiffs represented by Washington attorney Philip S. Friedman said TCI Communications of Baltimore charges a $5 late fee if payment is not received within about 10 days of billing. Now that Circuit Judge Gary I. Strausberg has certified the lawsuit as a class action, all subscribers who have paid a late fee since November 1991 are plaintiffs in the suit.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
A federal judge has granted class action status to two categories of people in a civil suit that claims officers at Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Center regularly and illegally detained certain arrestees too long and strip-searched people without cause. The ruling, issued Thursday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, opens the door for tens of thousands of people processed from May 2002 through April 2008 to join the suit, which seeks unspecified monetary damages. Central booking processes everyone arrested within city limits.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | January 20, 2002
ANY TIME a fund company is the target of a class action suit, investors can learn something. It doesn't matter whether the suit is fruitful or frivolous, there's always a lesson about how funds work and what investors need to know buried in these legal conflicts. This month, Van Wagoner Capital Management became the target of at least three class actions alleging that it misled investors about the value of shares in its Emerging Growth fund. No matter how the cases turn out, the entire saga should prompt investors to look more carefully into what they own. The lawsuits arose after a Wall Street Journal article last month questioned the way the fund valued "private placements," investments in companies that are not public and whose shares are not priced on any stock exchange.
BUSINESS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1997
A federal judge in Baltimore ruled yesterday that Honda Motor Co. dealers can band together to sue the automaker for claims that the company conspired to send shipments of cars to those willing to pay bribes while punishing dealers who refused to take part in the kickback scheme.In his long-anticipated ruling, Chief U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz sided with Honda dealers who argued that the best way to pursue the largest commercial bribery case in American history was by creating a class-action law suit.
HEALTH
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Attorneys launched a campaign Monday to notify former patients of a Johns Hopkins gynecologist accused of secretly photographing exams that they are eligible to register as part of a class-action suit. As many as 12,600 patients seen by Dr. Nikita Levy between 1988 and 2013 could register as part of the class action, said Jonathan Schochor, chairman of the plaintiffs' committee. If the attorneys are able to reach a monetary settlement with Johns Hopkins Hospital and affiliates, patients who have registered as part of the class-action group will be able to collect a portion of the money, Schochor said.
NEWS
By Justin George and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A former Johns Hopkins gynecologist, Dr. Nikita Levy, might have surreptitiously photographed or recorded the examinations of at least 9,000 patients, lawyers representing his alleged victims said Friday. More detailed allegations emerged as attorneys in a class-action lawsuit announced that a judge had approved negotiations for a group settlement with Johns Hopkins Hospital and its medical systems. Levy, who died in an apparent suicide in February as investigators closed in, had worked at the Baltimore hospital and health system since 1988.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Bus drivers and aides employed by a Baltimore schools contractor say that unsafe conditions such as fires and mold spores are endangering lives and unfair wages are threatening their livelihoods. The grievances were aired Thursday at a rally of employees of Durham School Services, a national company that transports children in more than 350 school districts. Since 2002, the city has contracted with Durham, which earned an estimated $15.5 million over the last three school years. The company's buses transport about 928 students.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Citing a severe and chronic backlog, advocacy groups have filed a class-action lawsuit accusing the state of failing low-income and disabled Marylanders by regularly taking nearly a year to approve medical assistance applications. The lawsuit, filed last week in Baltimore Circuit Court on behalf of nearly 10,000 disabled adults, seeks to force the Department of Human Resources to approve the Medicaid applications within 60 days, as required by state law. The advocates allege that nearly 46 percent of applications in 2012 were illegally delayed.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | November 23, 2012
Three former NFL players living in Maryland have filed a suit against the league alleging it hid information about the long-term health effects of concussions and endangered players' lives by "mythologizing" violent hits. The class-action suit seeks more than $600 million in compensatory and punitive damages. The players join almost 4,000 peers in filing suit against the league , according to Paul D. Anderson, a lawyer who specializes in advocating for traumatic brain injury victims and retired NFL players' rights.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
A class-action lawsuit has been filed against a Columbia-based medical staffing agency claiming it acted negligently in 2008 by hiring and placing a medical technician who allegedly went on to expose the plaintiffs to hepatitis C. The lawsuit also says the firm and UPMC Presbyterian, the Pittsburgh hospital where the technician allegedly came in contact with the plaintiffs, knew he had put patients at risk by stealing narcotics but never informed...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Rite Aid Corp. will pay shareholders $149.5 million in senior secured notes as the final installment to settle a nearly $200 million class action lawsuit, the company said yesterday. The Camp Hill, Pa., retailer, the nation's third largest drugstore chain, has already paid $45 million in cash toward the settlement, using liability insurance. To make the final payment, the company said, it amended a $1.9 billion secured credit facility. The consolidated class action suits alleged that Rite Aid's former management fraudulently misrepresented financial results for fiscal 1997, fiscal 1998 and fiscal 1999, which led to more than two years of losses and left the company on the brink of bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
Maryland attorneys are spending thousands of dollars to sign up clients who might have had heart stents needlessly implanted by a doctor at St. Joseph Medical Center - cases some say could be clear-cut victories for patients and a steady income stream for their lawyers. The Towson hospital sent letters to hundreds of patients last month, telling them that the expensive stents in their arteries might have been placed there unnecessarily and under false pretenses. And almost immediately, attorneys began calling for clients online, on TV and in print.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Just days after Comptroller Joan M. Pratt filed suit against the city, another prominent Baltimore official has filed notice of his intention to take City Hall to court. Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway has formally notified the city of his plans to file a class-action lawsuit over erroneous charges to residents by the municipal water billing system. "People have been overcharged and taken advantage of," Conaway said. "People have lost their homes. It's horrible.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The Maryland District Court said Thursday that its chief judge has dismissed 3,168 debt-collection cases against state residents and ordered that any liens associated with those cases be released. The move, involving Worldwide Asset Purchasing cases, is a result of a settlement in a federal class-action suit. Attorneys for the plaintiffs alleged that the debt-buying firm wasn't licensed, sued for the wrong amounts, filed cases after the statute of limitations had expired, and included consumers' Social Security numbers in publicly available court filings, the state judiciary said.
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