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Clarksville Middle School

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By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2002
IT'S LIGHTS, cameras and action every morning at Clarksville Middle School since CMSTV-25 began broadcasting last month. Staff members Kathy Glascock, Pat Greenwald and Mark Vinje began planning for the school's new television studio in the spring. Funded with money received for continuous improvement in MSPAP scores, the studio cost about $9,000 to equip. School-based news and the day's weather are televised in each classroom, beginning at 8:25 a.m. each day. Assistant Principal Scott Conroy said the studio and its equipment also can be used for classroom projects.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris | May 21, 2014
Megan Rabe, an eighth-grade student at Clarksville Middle School is among 11 students from across the Maryland who will compete in the 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee, May 27 - 29, at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, according to Howard County Library System officials. Rabe advanced to the national competition back in March when she won the HCLS competition -- she won after correctly spelling "quadrifid. " Rabe captured the title over 62 other contestants and, next week, will be among more than 250 spellers nationwide, HCLS said.
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NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Marcy Leonard, principal at Atholton High School, vividly recalls being taught by Carroll Wesley Haddaway as an eighth-grader at Clarksville Middle School. "What a passionate history educator," said Leonard, who recalled a three-day lesson that Haddaway presented on the Battle of Gettysburg. "He absolutely made the history come alive in his classroom. He truly knew how to motivate." Leonard said she is convinced that Haddaway played a large role in her decision to become a social studies teacher.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
Sam Osheroff had only one goal heading into this year's Howard County Spelling Bee. The 11-year-old sixth-grader wanted to improve on his third-place finish in last year's competition. Sam started his preparation for the competition a couple of months ago. He studied hundreds of flash cards from spelling competition word guides - even studying poolside while vacationing with his family in the Caribbean islands of Turks and Caicos. All the preparation and sacrifice paid off March 12 when the Clarksville Middle School student beat out 63 others from across the county and won the annual Howard County Spelling Bee. Sam, who won a $1,000 scholarship, a trophy and a copy of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, will now go on to compete in the National Spelling Bee in Washington from June 2-4. Siri Neerchal, a fifth-grade student at Centennial Lane Elementary School, was the second-place finalist.
NEWS
November 8, 1992
* Name: Marion Garrison, 68, of Clarksville. Formerly of Haddonfield, N.J.* Activities/Hobbies: Mrs. Garrison enjoys drama and going to plays, volunteering at Clarksville Elementary and Middle Schools, traveling and church activities.* Organization's Comments: Mrs. Garrison is known at the schools as Mrs. G. She was a teacher's secretary at Clarksville Elementary School for 25 years.Mrs. Garrison works in the classroom volunteering at Clarksville Elementary School and works in the guidance office and with special education students at Clarksville Middle School.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | September 23, 2006
Three Baltimore-area schools were among six in Maryland chosen as 2006 Blue Ribbon Schools under the national No Child Left Behind program. Severna Park Middle School in Anne Arundel County, Ridgely Middle School in Baltimore County and Clarksville Middle School in Howard County joined the ranks of 250 schools nationwide recognized for high achievement or significant improvement. Maryland's nominees filled out a lengthy application for the federal program after they were recognized in a statewide Blue Ribbon program.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | April 30, 1991
In the dark and dusty confines of a book store three 12-year-olds discover a magic folio containing the works of William Shakespeare given to them by the ghost of the Bard.The three gradually discover the wonders of "Julius Caesar," "Hamlet," "Macbeth," "Romeo and Juliet," "The Taming of the Shrew" and "The Tempest."The classic scenes are interwoven within a contemporary play focusing on reluctant students who are required to study Shakespeare.The original play, "Shakespeare's Just Another Dead Guy . . . Or Is He?"
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | January 26, 1995
Did your middle school or high school youngster bring home a large calendar printed with community notices and tips for parents last week? That splendid aid to help keep your household organized came compliments of the Western Howard County Coalition, a group of school, church, club, police and business leaders.Your new calendar is intended as more than a family resource. It's a community resource. The Western Howard County Coalition's mission is to share information on the problems of underage drinking and substance use and to try to find and distribute solutions to very real and frightening problems.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | August 5, 2007
While many of his friends were attending classes this year at Clarksville Middle School, Kevin McDuffie was roaming an elephant sanctuary in the mountains of Thailand. The 13-year-old's adventures were documented on the Nickelodeon television show Nick News Adventure: If I Could Talk To The Elephants, which aired July 22. Kevin, who lives in Clarksville, joined five other youngsters and veteran broadcast journalist Linda Ellerbee for a week in the sanctuary, where the youths learned to feed, bathe, ride, clean up after and, most important, to communicate with the animals.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2000
Since January, pupils from Swansfield Elementary School have been creating life-size papier-mache sculptures of children from other cultures. Last week, their work made its debut at Florence Bain Senior Center. Swansfield Elementary School Principal Earl Slacumsaid the sculptures reflect the different cultures in the community. "We're very proud of our cultural diversity at Swansfield," he said. In the fall, Swansfield PTA President Abby Futtermet with Judi Bard, program specialist with the Howard County Office on Aging, to discuss opportunities for students and seniors to interact.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | August 5, 2007
While many of his friends were attending classes this year at Clarksville Middle School, Kevin McDuffie was roaming an elephant sanctuary in the mountains of Thailand. The 13-year-old's adventures were documented on the Nickelodeon television show Nick News Adventure: If I Could Talk To The Elephants, which aired July 22. Kevin, who lives in Clarksville, joined five other youngsters and veteran broadcast journalist Linda Ellerbee for a week in the sanctuary, where the youths learned to feed, bathe, ride, clean up after and, most important, to communicate with the animals.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | September 23, 2006
Three Baltimore-area schools were among six in Maryland chosen as 2006 Blue Ribbon Schools under the national No Child Left Behind program. Severna Park Middle School in Anne Arundel County, Ridgely Middle School in Baltimore County and Clarksville Middle School in Howard County joined the ranks of 250 schools nationwide recognized for high achievement or significant improvement. Maryland's nominees filled out a lengthy application for the federal program after they were recognized in a statewide Blue Ribbon program.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | May 14, 2006
Despite receiving the news last week that their school would receive the money necessary to begin a renovation project, sixth-graders at Clarksville Middle School are not done with their money-saving plan to promote energy efficiency. The pupils, members of Sandy Vinje's sixth-grade Gifted-and-Talented Program science classes, conducted energy audits throughout the school as part of the Green Schools program, which teaches students about energy efficiency. As a result of their audits, the pupils discovered that the school can reduce energy consumption by up to 14 percent, simply by turning off lights that are not being used.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Marcy Leonard, principal at Atholton High School, vividly recalls being taught by Carroll Wesley Haddaway as an eighth-grader at Clarksville Middle School. "What a passionate history educator," said Leonard, who recalled a three-day lesson that Haddaway presented on the Battle of Gettysburg. "He absolutely made the history come alive in his classroom. He truly knew how to motivate." Leonard said she is convinced that Haddaway played a large role in her decision to become a social studies teacher.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Armed with clipboards and various gadgets that resembled those on old episodes of Star Trek, sixth-graders Matt Lurie, Holly Sandler and Daniel Pham entered a Clarksville Middle School classroom and immediately started taking readings. Daniel, 11, grabbed a flashlight, dropped to the floor and looked in between a desk and wall trying to identify a power plug. Matt, 11, pointed an infrared machine at a television and began shouting numbers. And Holly, 12, recorded the data. For three months, this scene at Clarksville Middle School has been repeated as pupils in two of Sandy Vinje's sixth-grade Gifted- and-Talented Program science classes conduct energy audits throughout the school as part of the Green Schools program, which teaches students about energy efficiency.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2002
TWELVE-YEAR-old Connor Cooper is enjoying his status as a published poet. The Clarksville Middle School youth's poem "What's Going On?" has been published in a national pediatricians' newsletter, Pediatric News, and in a collection of poetry titled United We Stand, which was produced by Clarksville Middle School pupils. His poem has also been selected for inclusion in the Young American Poetry Digest and A Celebration of Poets. His poem began as an assignment in English teacher Debbi Holihan's sixth-grade class.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
Robert Reid was a "cool" school bus driver who let his student passengers have their freedom. On the 15-minute drive from Clarksville Middle School to Columbia, the youths say, they would joke with him, and he would play dance music on the radio.But on Monday, Howard County school officials say, Mr. Reid was irresponsible when he let 35 students off the bus on busy Route 32 -- about a mile short of their destination -- after many complained about standstill traffic.Officials at Yellow Transportation Inc. in Baltimore fired Mr. Reid the next day for not following a company and school rule: Do not allow students off the bus until they reach their stop.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | November 4, 1993
Make new friends and keep the old might be the motto of the Burntwoods Bridge Club, which has met in Glenwood continuously for the past 25 years.The first monthly club meeting was in June 1968, and since then the club has missed only two meetings because of foul weather, and one because of vacations.This group of friends plays bridge, chats during lunch and enjoys each other's company. When a regular player leaves, another friend takes her place. Some members date their friendships at more than 50 years.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2002
IT'S LIGHTS, cameras and action every morning at Clarksville Middle School since CMSTV-25 began broadcasting last month. Staff members Kathy Glascock, Pat Greenwald and Mark Vinje began planning for the school's new television studio in the spring. Funded with money received for continuous improvement in MSPAP scores, the studio cost about $9,000 to equip. School-based news and the day's weather are televised in each classroom, beginning at 8:25 a.m. each day. Assistant Principal Scott Conroy said the studio and its equipment also can be used for classroom projects.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Howard County Board of Education members agonized last night over a balancing act they just couldn't seem to master: how to approve a proposed capital budget that is several million dollars more than last year's, and still doesn't include all the projects needed in a district bulging with students. As their work session stretched into the night, board members appeared ready to hold the bottom line on their conservative construction budget for next school year. "The new [enrollment projection]
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