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Clarksville Elementary School

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NEWS
November 10, 1991
From: Jennifer PrughEllicott CityMany students are displeased with the new drug and alcohol policythe Howard County Board of Education has instituted this year. The new penalties are overly harsh and seem pointless to many students.Most of us subjected to the new policy find the consequences steeperthan they need to be. The policy states that students caught using or possessing drugs or alcohol on school grounds will be suspended, must attend mandatory counseling and need to schedule a conference uponreturning to school.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | September 13, 2013
A Clarksville man has been charged by Howard County police in connection with the burglary of a church, a school and businesses in his community over the last few weeks. Jason Wingo, 34, of 5657 Trotter Road in Clarksville, faces numerous counts of burglary, destruction of property and theft in a series of incidents beginning on Aug. 7, according to police.  Wingo, who was arrested on Thursday, Sept. 12, is being held at the Howard County Detention Center on no bond, police said.  Police said they began investigating a burglary at the River Hill Garden Center on Aug. 20 after someone broke a lock on a back door, made entry, pried a safe and stole cash and tools.
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NEWS
Clarksville21029@yahoo.com | May 30, 2013
There are only a few more opportunities to hear young local musicians in concert before the close of the school year on June 14. The Clarksville Elementary School chorus will present a concert at the school on Monday, June 10. The Clarksville Middle School orchestra is scheduled for its concert on Wednesday, June 12. Happy birthday to Mun Pan Sumlat. The perky young lady turned 4 on June 3. Have a great year, Mun Pan. Clarksville Middle held its second annual Family Fun Run recently.
NEWS
Clarksville21029@yahoo.com | May 30, 2013
There are only a few more opportunities to hear young local musicians in concert before the close of the school year on June 14. The Clarksville Elementary School chorus will present a concert at the school on Monday, June 10. The Clarksville Middle School orchestra is scheduled for its concert on Wednesday, June 12. Happy birthday to Mun Pan Sumlat. The perky young lady turned 4 on June 3. Have a great year, Mun Pan. Clarksville Middle held its second annual Family Fun Run recently.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Maryland's teachers will be giving lessons that require students to dig deeper into their subjects and be more analytical if the state adopts new national standards as expected this spring. A sampling of veteran teachers in the region concludes that the standards, which specify what should be taught from kindergarten to 12th grade, would be an improvement. Never before has the state attempted such a quick and large-scale overhaul of what is taught in every public school classroom.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | September 13, 2013
A Clarksville man has been charged by Howard County police in connection with the burglary of a church, a school and businesses in his community over the last few weeks. Jason Wingo, 34, of 5657 Trotter Road in Clarksville, faces numerous counts of burglary, destruction of property and theft in a series of incidents beginning on Aug. 7, according to police.  Wingo, who was arrested on Thursday, Sept. 12, is being held at the Howard County Detention Center on no bond, police said.  Police said they began investigating a burglary at the River Hill Garden Center on Aug. 20 after someone broke a lock on a back door, made entry, pried a safe and stole cash and tools.
NEWS
By Geri Hastings and Geri Hastings,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 1998
WHAT IS the No. 1 disease that kills children, ages one through 14?If you answered "Leukemia," you are correct.In February, Clarksville Elementary School joined thousands of other schools nationwide in the fifth "Pasta for Pennies" campaign against the disease, sponsored by The Leukemia Society of America and Olive Garden Restaurants.For more than two weeks, students and faculty members at Clarksville donated their spare change to help fight the disease.The fund-raising effort was spurred on by interclass competition and the prospect of being guests of honor at a luncheon.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Clarksville Elementary School will hold its Spring Fling from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 11. Games, prizes, raffles, a plant sale, face-painting, nail-painting, a silent auction, martial arts demonstrations and other entertainment, a barbecue, nachos, pizza, hot dogs, snowballs and cotton candy are planned. Turner, Dean of Magic, will perform, and the Ravens' mascot will be on hand. Information: 410-531-3946. International Night slated at River Hill High School The International Club of River Hill High School will hold its second RHHS International Night at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2000
The bitter cold of a December morning did little to chill the enthusiasm of a group of Clarksville Elementary School children and mothers as they loaded nearly 255 packages - some containing several gifts - into the back of two minivans and a sport utility vehicle. Choruses of "This is fun" were heard from children and mothers as they carted, carried and hauled brightly wrapped gifts from a storage closet to the waiting vehicles. The children giggled and exclaimed over the boxes. "Here comes a really big one," called one. "We're playing hooky," another said jokingly because he got a respite from class to load the presents.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
A drum beats out a rhythmic African tune. Hands are clapping in time, a tempo like a heartbeat. One hundred small voices begin to sing these soulful words from Ghana: Tu-e tu-e barima tu-e tu-e. Hey, hey! We want to go to Ghana The preteen singers aren't cloaked in kente, but sporting Abercrombie and Fitch, clunky clogs and Nikes. The scrunchies that are wrapped around ponytails belong to girls with names like Mary Sue. It's the Clarksville Elementary School chorus that's singing with the rhythm, the energy and the soul of an African gospel choir.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2010
Maryland's teachers will be giving lessons that require students to dig deeper into their subjects and be more analytical if the state adopts new national standards as expected this spring. A sampling of veteran teachers in the region concludes that the standards, which specify what should be taught from kindergarten to 12th grade, would be an improvement. Never before has the state attempted such a quick and large-scale overhaul of what is taught in every public school classroom.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Clarksville Elementary School will hold its Spring Fling from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 11. Games, prizes, raffles, a plant sale, face-painting, nail-painting, a silent auction, martial arts demonstrations and other entertainment, a barbecue, nachos, pizza, hot dogs, snowballs and cotton candy are planned. Turner, Dean of Magic, will perform, and the Ravens' mascot will be on hand. Information: 410-531-3946. International Night slated at River Hill High School The International Club of River Hill High School will hold its second RHHS International Night at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2001
Fourth-graders at Clarksville Elementary School were in Laurie Basham's art class when they heard the news of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. Basham found herself having to let the frightened children know what was happening. In simple terms, she told them the news and tried to reassure them. Then she gave them the opportunity to turn their feelings into art. Their responses, and those of other Clarksville Elementary schoolchildren, are on display on the school's Web site. Each grade level had a different assignment for the art project, including flowers and "patriotism," and the fourth-graders' symbolic rubbings.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2000
The bitter cold of a December morning did little to chill the enthusiasm of a group of Clarksville Elementary School children and mothers as they loaded nearly 255 packages - some containing several gifts - into the back of two minivans and a sport utility vehicle. Choruses of "This is fun" were heard from children and mothers as they carted, carried and hauled brightly wrapped gifts from a storage closet to the waiting vehicles. The children giggled and exclaimed over the boxes. "Here comes a really big one," called one. "We're playing hooky," another said jokingly because he got a respite from class to load the presents.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
A drum beats out a rhythmic African tune. Hands are clapping in time, a tempo like a heartbeat. One hundred small voices begin to sing these soulful words from Ghana: Tu-e tu-e barima tu-e tu-e. Hey, hey! We want to go to Ghana The preteen singers aren't cloaked in kente, but sporting Abercrombie and Fitch, clunky clogs and Nikes. The scrunchies that are wrapped around ponytails belong to girls with names like Mary Sue. It's the Clarksville Elementary School chorus that's singing with the rhythm, the energy and the soul of an African gospel choir.
NEWS
By Janie J. C. O'Neal and Janie J. C. O'Neal,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 27, 1998
The performance of William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" was different than most. Scenery was made from construction paper, a makeshift stage set up in front of a Steinway piano, and the invited audience was seated on folding chairs.Dressed in homemade, composite costumes of satin and chiffon, the actors performed flawlessly. This was not surprising, considering the entire production was arranged, produced and acted by Lisa and Carolyn Rosinsky -- ages 10 and 8, respectively.The Clarksville Elementary School sisters are big fans of this Shakespearean play.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2001
Fourth-graders at Clarksville Elementary School were in Laurie Basham's art class when they heard the news of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. Basham found herself having to let the frightened children know what was happening. In simple terms, she told them the news and tried to reassure them. Then she gave them the opportunity to turn their feelings into art. Their responses, and those of other Clarksville Elementary schoolchildren, are on display on the school's Web site. Each grade level had a different assignment for the art project, including flowers and "patriotism," and the fourth-graders' symbolic rubbings.
NEWS
By Geri Hastings and Geri Hastings,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 1998
WHAT IS the No. 1 disease that kills children, ages one through 14?If you answered "Leukemia," you are correct.In February, Clarksville Elementary School joined thousands of other schools nationwide in the fifth "Pasta for Pennies" campaign against the disease, sponsored by The Leukemia Society of America and Olive Garden Restaurants.For more than two weeks, students and faculty members at Clarksville donated their spare change to help fight the disease.The fund-raising effort was spurred on by interclass competition and the prospect of being guests of honor at a luncheon.
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