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Clarksville Elementary

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By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
It's been a remarkable change out here at Clarksville," said Brad Herling, principal of Clarksville Elementary School. The school celebrated its 40th anniversary this month with skits, guests and a tour of the building. Clarksville Elementary's first principal, 82-year-old Lee McFarlane, was guest of honor at the event Oct. 2. He and other former staff members and pupils spoke of the area's shift from farmland to suburb. The celebration, organized by the school's PTA, drew about 300 people.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
New Howard County schools Superintendent Renee Foose lauded the system's results on the Maryland School Assessment tests but said she's concerned about the focus that is placed on proficiency exams in general. "I'm concerned that all of our energy goes into this [test scores] release, and I want that same energy to go into more education of the whole child. That's my personal concern," said Foose, who took over as county superintendent this month, replacing Sydney Cousin. The former Baltimore County deputy superintendent inherited one of the state's best-performing school systems, as evidenced in rankings of the Baltimore-area schools with the highest percentages of students who passed the MSA. Clarksville Elementary posted a 98.6 percent passing mark, tops for Howard schools and 12th among all Baltimore-area schools, according to an analysis of Maryland State Department of Education data by The Baltimore Sun. St. John's Lane Elementary in Ellicott City (98.6 percent)
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
New Howard County schools Superintendent Renee Foose lauded the system's results on the Maryland School Assessment tests but said she's concerned about the focus that is placed on proficiency exams in general. "I'm concerned that all of our energy goes into this [test scores] release, and I want that same energy to go into more education of the whole child. That's my personal concern," said Foose, who took over as county superintendent this month, replacing Sydney Cousin. The former Baltimore County deputy superintendent inherited one of the state's best-performing school systems, as evidenced in rankings of the Baltimore-area schools with the highest percentages of students who passed the MSA. Clarksville Elementary posted a 98.6 percent passing mark, tops for Howard schools and 12th among all Baltimore-area schools, according to an analysis of Maryland State Department of Education data by The Baltimore Sun. St. John's Lane Elementary in Ellicott City (98.6 percent)
NEWS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
The cougar didn't leave any paw prints, just an imprint on the mulch where it used to sit in front of Clarksville Elementary School. The Blue Ribbon school's beloved mascot -- a life-size sculpture commissioned by the fifth-grade Class of 2003 -- was stolen this month, leaving pupils and teachers baffled. "It's a sad story," Principal Brad Herling said yesterday. Who would take the approximately 275-pound concrete sculpture that was chained to a bench at the entrance of the school? "Maybe some people who were against mascots and who thought it would be cool to see a school worry," said Emily Rabinowitz, 8, a third-grader.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2000
ON FRIDAY, the student body of Clarksville Elementary School assembled in the school cafeteria for a millennium celebration. The children wore millennium T-shirts they had made with the help of art teacher Laurie Basham. Each grade wore a different color, creating a rainbow of neon green and yellow, orange, with accents of light blue, navy and black on the floor where they sat. Several children from each grade presented their grade's millennium project, which involved collecting 1,000 items to benefit a community group.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | December 9, 1993
Happy Hanukkah! I hope you enjoy each evening of this Festival of Lights.*Nancy Draughon has done some remarkable volunteer work for Clarksville Elementary School.She served as editor of The Cougar Press, the school newsletter. She was a chairwoman of the annual Clarksville Spring Fling.Then she served as president of the PTA for two years, during which she started many new programs.Among these are the Young Authors program, the Parenting Program, the Parenting Fair and Resource Center, the Family Read-In night, Breakfast Buddies, the Secret Shop and the redecoration of the staff lounge.
NEWS
By Geri Hastings and Geri Hastings,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 1998
WHAT IS the No. 1 disease that kills children, ages one through 14?If you answered "Leukemia," you are correct.In February, Clarksville Elementary School joined thousands of other schools nationwide in the fifth "Pasta for Pennies" campaign against the disease, sponsored by The Leukemia Society of America and Olive Garden Restaurants.For more than two weeks, students and faculty members at Clarksville donated their spare change to help fight the disease.The fund-raising effort was spurred on by interclass competition and the prospect of being guests of honor at a luncheon.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Clarksville Elementary School will hold its Spring Fling from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 11. Games, prizes, raffles, a plant sale, face-painting, nail-painting, a silent auction, martial arts demonstrations and other entertainment, a barbecue, nachos, pizza, hot dogs, snowballs and cotton candy are planned. Turner, Dean of Magic, will perform, and the Ravens' mascot will be on hand. Information: 410-531-3946. International Night slated at River Hill High School The International Club of River Hill High School will hold its second RHHS International Night at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
EACH YEAR, when school closes for the summer, pupils say goodbye to their teachers. And in the fall, they nervously meet the new teaching staff for the next year. But one person at Clarksville Elementary School has remained constant for the children - school secretary Pat Anthony. Anthony will retire June 30. She says it's time to move on after three decades at the school. "We're going to miss her," said past PTA President Lynn Paynter. Clarksville Elementary is also losing staff member Frances Williams, who worked 29 years as a custodian and building supervisor at the school.
NEWS
By Sally Buckler and Sally Buckler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1996
AT THE END of a long day, you take 20 minutes to read to your children or have them read to you. The phone rings. Do you answer? You do if your children attend Clarksville Elementary School because it might be the principal calling.For a month, Principal Kaye Cornmesser and Assistant Principal Bill Jenkins have been trying to catch students and their families reading.So far, they have caught about 80 percent of the students, and Ms. Cornmesser and Mr. Jenkins are determined to catch the rest.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
It's been a remarkable change out here at Clarksville," said Brad Herling, principal of Clarksville Elementary School. The school celebrated its 40th anniversary this month with skits, guests and a tour of the building. Clarksville Elementary's first principal, 82-year-old Lee McFarlane, was guest of honor at the event Oct. 2. He and other former staff members and pupils spoke of the area's shift from farmland to suburb. The celebration, organized by the school's PTA, drew about 300 people.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
EACH YEAR, when school closes for the summer, pupils say goodbye to their teachers. And in the fall, they nervously meet the new teaching staff for the next year. But one person at Clarksville Elementary School has remained constant for the children - school secretary Pat Anthony. Anthony will retire June 30. She says it's time to move on after three decades at the school. "We're going to miss her," said past PTA President Lynn Paynter. Clarksville Elementary is also losing staff member Frances Williams, who worked 29 years as a custodian and building supervisor at the school.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Clarksville Elementary School will hold its Spring Fling from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 11. Games, prizes, raffles, a plant sale, face-painting, nail-painting, a silent auction, martial arts demonstrations and other entertainment, a barbecue, nachos, pizza, hot dogs, snowballs and cotton candy are planned. Turner, Dean of Magic, will perform, and the Ravens' mascot will be on hand. Information: 410-531-3946. International Night slated at River Hill High School The International Club of River Hill High School will hold its second RHHS International Night at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
Howard County school officials last night asked the Board of Education to consider moving 230 children out of Pointers Run Elementary School next year to free up space in the county's most crowded elementary school. Although all 55 of the county's elementary and middle schools will be considered for redistricting next year, the board thought it necessary to redraw boundary lines for Pointers Run early because the school is so crowded. Pointers Run has a capacity of 666 pupils, but has about 1,000 children enrolled.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
It was under this tree that fifth-grader Becky Paynter found her first friend at Clarksville Elementary School. In the shade of the hulking silver maple, the new second-grader was spotted at recess by a classmate who invited her to play soccer. In third grade, Becky used the tree in a science project: She observed it. She craned her neck in awe of it. She loved it. By fourth grade, she had deemed the tree "Da Bomb." So when chainsaw-wielding construction workers gathered menacingly around the tree last week, poised to cut it down to make way for a parking lot, Becky, energized by four years of history and admiration, flung herself against its peeling trunk.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
It was under this tree that fifth-grader Becky Paynter found her first friend at Clarksville Elementary School. In the shade of the hulking silver maple, the new second-grader was spotted at recess by a classmate who invited her to play soccer. In third grade, Becky used the tree in a science project: She observed it. She craned her neck in awe of it. She loved it. By fourth grade, she had deemed the tree "Da Bomb." So when chain saw-wielding construction workers gathered menacingly around the tree last week, poised to cut it down to make way for a parking lot, Becky, energized by four years of history and admiration, flung herself against its peeling trunk.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | October 16, 1991
At Clarksville Elementary School, rabbits, foxes and deer are alwayswelcome in the classroom -- the outdoor classroom, where students can observe wildlife up-close, learn about soil erosion and identify flowers and plants.Behind the school and backing up to an open field, the environmental study area is the result of a four-year project involving students, parents, community groups and local businesses.In addition to the classroom, where tall trees encircle four worktables, the area includes a butterfly garden, animal tracks box and outdoor amphitheater.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2001
Fourth-graders at Clarksville Elementary School were in Laurie Basham's art class when they heard the news of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. Basham found herself having to let the frightened children know what was happening. In simple terms, she told them the news and tried to reassure them. Then she gave them the opportunity to turn their feelings into art. Their responses, and those of other Clarksville Elementary schoolchildren, are on display on the school's Web site. Each grade level had a different assignment for the art project, including flowers and "patriotism," and the fourth-graders' symbolic rubbings.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2001
Fourth-graders at Clarksville Elementary School were in Laurie Basham's art class when they heard the news of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. Basham found herself having to let the frightened children know what was happening. In simple terms, she told them the news and tried to reassure them. Then she gave them the opportunity to turn their feelings into art. Their responses, and those of other Clarksville Elementary schoolchildren, are on display on the school's Web site. Each grade level had a different assignment for the art project, including flowers and "patriotism," and the fourth-graders' symbolic rubbings.
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