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By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2004
Near the end of Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill, Vol. 2, Bill (David Carradine) compares the double life of his former girlfriend/assassin (Uma Thurman) with that of Superman. Superman's mythology, Bill contends, is different from other superheroes because unlike, say, Peter Parker, who fights crime as Spider-Man to protect his everyday life, Superman was born on another planet and uses his human identity to blend in, to hide from humanity. The bespectacled Clark Kent is Superman's critique of the human race as weak and cowardly, Bill says.
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NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | October 9, 2008
You won't be able to spot Priestley at old ZIP code Beverly Hills' original sideburned heartthrob is back - sort of. Jason Priestley has agreed to do an episode of 90210 later this season - but he'll be behind the camera, not in front of it. Entertainment Weekly reports on its Web site that Priestley will helm this season's 18th episode, which is slated to air this spring. Meanwhile, a 90210 insider also reveals that Priestley's TV sis, Shannen Doherty, is close to a deal to do two more episodes this season.
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BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 28, 2006
Hedge funds are thought to be the wealthy investor's Superman - funds that are able to leap tall buildings in a single bound to make investors richer, even when the stock market is acting the villain. But are they Supermen, or mere mortals? Academics who have peeked under the hero's cape told an Atlanta Federal Reserve meeting on hedge-fund risk this month that despite some extraordinary funds, the average performer looks a lot more like Clark Kent than Superman. And since hedge funds - lightly regulated pools that often make big bets with borrowed money - have an incentive to try to take risks, even if it's too dicey, investors, the firms that lend them millions and regulators have to be more vigilant than they've been in keeping an eye out for daredevils.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | December 6, 2007
I got to teach Episcopal Sunday school last week, a rare privilege, and it was in a New York church so the kids had plenty to say. Teenagers, and if you expect them to sit in rapt silence as you tick off points of theology, you're in the wrong place. They made plenty of noise, and not much of it about religion. Some of them seemed to be on a faith journey that was heading away from the Nicene Creed toward something cooler and jokier, some form of animism perhaps, the worship of cougars and badgers.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 2, 1990
Zsa Zsa Gabor wishes them luck. Marvin Mitchelson is issuing pre-nuptial advice. And Dr. Ruth? Heck, she won't even discuss it.It's that engagement between Lois Lane and Clark Kent. We asked experts whether this couple is headed down the aisle, down the road or down the tubes."Because he'll be out and about, Lois will eventually wonder about his whereabouts," says advice columnist Jeff Zaslow. "He's going to have trouble explaining what's on his collar and where his clothes are."Margery D. Rosen, a columnist for Ladies' Home Journal: "She might not understand the abrupt departures.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
He may sometimes look like Clark Kent, but Anne Arundel police say he has nothing in common with Superman.Superman fought villains, but this well-dressed man, dubbed the "Clark Kent Bandit," by police, is suspected of committing five gas station robberies in Glen Burnie, Pasadena and Brooklyn Park over three days last week.Police say he may be using disguises -- including one of Clark Kent -- to confuse police. But the bandit's disguise may lead to his downfall, according to county police spokesman Officer Vaughn Dykes.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
SUPERMAN HAS ALWAYS BEEN the most uncomplicated of superheroes. He's all-powerful, as long as there's no kryptonite around. He's not conflicted, except occasionally about his feelings for Lois Lane. He's good, and kind, and really does believe in "truth, justice and the American way." He's not prone to melancholia, or skirting the law, or wishing he were someone else. Compared to other superheroes, the Man of Steel's practically Mother Teresa. Consider the brooding Batman, who these days is more vigilante than hero.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | October 9, 2008
You won't be able to spot Priestley at old ZIP code Beverly Hills' original sideburned heartthrob is back - sort of. Jason Priestley has agreed to do an episode of 90210 later this season - but he'll be behind the camera, not in front of it. Entertainment Weekly reports on its Web site that Priestley will helm this season's 18th episode, which is slated to air this spring. Meanwhile, a 90210 insider also reveals that Priestley's TV sis, Shannen Doherty, is close to a deal to do two more episodes this season.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 16, 2001
Teen drama is one of the most under-appreciated genres in television and film. But when Hollywood gets it right -- as in Beverly Hills, 90210 or Buffy, the Vampire Slayer -- the series light up our popular culture, exploding beyond the screen into magazines, fashion, lifestyle and the fantasy lives of millions of adolescent Americans. Smallville, a new series from WB chronicling Superman's teen years in the farming community of Smallville, Kansas, is an example of television getting it right.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
She doesn't look it, but neither did Clark Kent. Jean Silver-Isenstadt, an unassuming Columbia wife and mother, has an alter ego that can hold its own against the fictional likes of Spider-Man and Wonder Woman. But her super-human strength isn't brawn; it's brains. Silver-Isenstadt, 34, is a superstudent (but don't call her that to her face; she gets annoyed), dedicated to lifelong learning and garnering degrees the way some people collect stamps. On Friday, decked out in her ignorance-obliterating outfit (a black graduation cap and gown)
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
SUPERMAN HAS ALWAYS BEEN the most uncomplicated of superheroes. He's all-powerful, as long as there's no kryptonite around. He's not conflicted, except occasionally about his feelings for Lois Lane. He's good, and kind, and really does believe in "truth, justice and the American way." He's not prone to melancholia, or skirting the law, or wishing he were someone else. Compared to other superheroes, the Man of Steel's practically Mother Teresa. Consider the brooding Batman, who these days is more vigilante than hero.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 28, 2006
Hedge funds are thought to be the wealthy investor's Superman - funds that are able to leap tall buildings in a single bound to make investors richer, even when the stock market is acting the villain. But are they Supermen, or mere mortals? Academics who have peeked under the hero's cape told an Atlanta Federal Reserve meeting on hedge-fund risk this month that despite some extraordinary funds, the average performer looks a lot more like Clark Kent than Superman. And since hedge funds - lightly regulated pools that often make big bets with borrowed money - have an incentive to try to take risks, even if it's too dicey, investors, the firms that lend them millions and regulators have to be more vigilant than they've been in keeping an eye out for daredevils.
FEATURES
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2004
Near the end of Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill, Vol. 2, Bill (David Carradine) compares the double life of his former girlfriend/assassin (Uma Thurman) with that of Superman. Superman's mythology, Bill contends, is different from other superheroes because unlike, say, Peter Parker, who fights crime as Spider-Man to protect his everyday life, Superman was born on another planet and uses his human identity to blend in, to hide from humanity. The bespectacled Clark Kent is Superman's critique of the human race as weak and cowardly, Bill says.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
She doesn't look it, but neither did Clark Kent. Jean Silver-Isenstadt, an unassuming Columbia wife and mother, has an alter ego that can hold its own against the fictional likes of Spider-Man and Wonder Woman. But her super-human strength isn't brawn; it's brains. Silver-Isenstadt, 34, is a superstudent (but don't call her that to her face; she gets annoyed), dedicated to lifelong learning and garnering degrees the way some people collect stamps. On Friday, decked out in her ignorance-obliterating outfit (a black graduation cap and gown)
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 23, 2001
WE CONTINUE to see evidence of an alarming decline in the quality of our nation's criminals. Consider the man who attempted to rob a mini-mart in the town of Vernon, Conn., as reported in a Journal Inquirer story sent in by alert reader Dan Thompson. The robber elected to wear a disguise, which was a good idea, since he was a regular customer of the store. The problem was the particular disguise he picked. Shaving cream. Yes. According to police, the man walked into the store with his face lathered in shaving cream, apparently believing that this made him unrecognizable.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 16, 2001
Teen drama is one of the most under-appreciated genres in television and film. But when Hollywood gets it right -- as in Beverly Hills, 90210 or Buffy, the Vampire Slayer -- the series light up our popular culture, exploding beyond the screen into magazines, fashion, lifestyle and the fantasy lives of millions of adolescent Americans. Smallville, a new series from WB chronicling Superman's teen years in the farming community of Smallville, Kansas, is an example of television getting it right.
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 23, 2001
WE CONTINUE to see evidence of an alarming decline in the quality of our nation's criminals. Consider the man who attempted to rob a mini-mart in the town of Vernon, Conn., as reported in a Journal Inquirer story sent in by alert reader Dan Thompson. The robber elected to wear a disguise, which was a good idea, since he was a regular customer of the store. The problem was the particular disguise he picked. Shaving cream. Yes. According to police, the man walked into the store with his face lathered in shaving cream, apparently believing that this made him unrecognizable.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | December 6, 2007
I got to teach Episcopal Sunday school last week, a rare privilege, and it was in a New York church so the kids had plenty to say. Teenagers, and if you expect them to sit in rapt silence as you tick off points of theology, you're in the wrong place. They made plenty of noise, and not much of it about religion. Some of them seemed to be on a faith journey that was heading away from the Nicene Creed toward something cooler and jokier, some form of animism perhaps, the worship of cougars and badgers.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
He may sometimes look like Clark Kent, but Anne Arundel police say he has nothing in common with Superman.Superman fought villains, but this well-dressed man, dubbed the "Clark Kent Bandit," by police, is suspected of committing five gas station robberies in Glen Burnie, Pasadena and Brooklyn Park over three days last week.Police say he may be using disguises -- including one of Clark Kent -- to confuse police. But the bandit's disguise may lead to his downfall, according to county police spokesman Officer Vaughn Dykes.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 2, 1990
Zsa Zsa Gabor wishes them luck. Marvin Mitchelson is issuing pre-nuptial advice. And Dr. Ruth? Heck, she won't even discuss it.It's that engagement between Lois Lane and Clark Kent. We asked experts whether this couple is headed down the aisle, down the road or down the tubes."Because he'll be out and about, Lois will eventually wonder about his whereabouts," says advice columnist Jeff Zaslow. "He's going to have trouble explaining what's on his collar and where his clothes are."Margery D. Rosen, a columnist for Ladies' Home Journal: "She might not understand the abrupt departures.
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