Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClark Johnson
IN THE NEWS

Clark Johnson

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Robert Philpot and Robert Philpot,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 2003
Fans of the '90s TV show Homicide: Life on the Street will remember Clark Johnson as Meldrick Lewis, the funky, porkpie-hat-wearing detective who had a way with a laid-back one-liner. They might also note that they haven't seen much of him since the show left the air in 1999. That's because Johnson has been busier behind the camera. The actor has become a director, responsible for such quality TV as the premiere of The Shield and episodes of The Wire, Soul Food and The West Wing. This month, Johnson stepped up to the big screen - oddly enough, with a movie based on a TV show.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
The ReWired for Change launch party at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park and Museum marked the official kick-off of a nonprofit started by "The Wire" star Sonja Sohn. The organization's mission is to help at-risk youth learn to make better life choices by using the HBO series itself - which was filmed in Baltimore from 2002 to 2007 - as a learning tool. Sohn - in a ruffly black chiffon cocktail dress and strappy gold high heels - looked the antithesis of her character, Detective Kima Greggs.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 17, 1995
"Swallows and Amazons," by Arthur Ransome. It's a sailing adventure about kids. My mom read it to me and now I'm reading it to my kids.Clark Johnson (Detective Meldrick Lewis, "Homicide: Life on the Street")
ENTERTAINMENT
By sloane brown and sloane brown,sloane@sloanebrown.com | October 19, 2008
Hundreds of well-heeled Baltimoreans turned out for the "Steps to the Cure Inaugural Ball," where mannequin legs sprouted on the bar and on tables throughout the room, each outrageously decorated and up for auction. A trellis trimmed with shoes graced one wall; guests could pick a pair to take home. The evening's highlight was a fashion show moderated by a celebrity guest - Project Runway winner Christian Siriano. The evening was the brainchild of local plastic surgeon Dr. Larry Lickstein and his wife, Lori Lickstein, who have lived in Baltimore just two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | August 6, 2000
The chance to see Clark Johnson (a.k.a. Detective Meldrick Lewis of "Homicide") playing the role of a hit man wannabe would be enough to recommend "Deliberate Intent," a made-for-cable movie about a famous Maryland murder case premiering tonight on the FX Channel. But there's more: a strong performance by Academy-Award-winning actor Timothy Hutton in the lead, as well as a screenplay that intelligently illuminates one of the more important recent First Amendment cases. The film, based on a book of the same title by Rod Smolla, follows the story of a former Motown executive, Lawrence Horn (James McDaniel)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
There's great fun to be had in seeing Michael Douglas and Kiefer Sutherland chew up the scenery (as well as their fellow actors) as Secret Service agents struggling to unravel a plot to assassinate the president. Too bad The Sentinel doesn't offer much more. Instead, the movie - based on a novel by Gerald Petievich - offers a setup that inexplicably goes away about halfway through, characters who seem to have missed much of their Secret Service basic training, atmosphere that doesn't really have to do with anything and way too many guys with machine guns within easy reach of the president of the United States.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
The ReWired for Change launch party at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park and Museum marked the official kick-off of a nonprofit started by "The Wire" star Sonja Sohn. The organization's mission is to help at-risk youth learn to make better life choices by using the HBO series itself - which was filmed in Baltimore from 2002 to 2007 - as a learning tool. Sohn - in a ruffly black chiffon cocktail dress and strappy gold high heels - looked the antithesis of her character, Detective Kima Greggs.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2001
"Boycott," HBO's brilliant dramatization of the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott, does something that's almost impossible; it takes a national icon and shows us the man he was before he became the mythic image we know today. In showing us the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s humanity - with its hopes, fears and personal, everyday dreams - we appreciate the measure of the man's greatness all the more, while coming to understand our collective past in new and instructive ways. The 26-year-old King is at the center of "Boycott" as a young husband and father starting in a new job at a new congregation when Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Ala. Within days, King's journey from private family man to public figure and national voice of moral authority would begin.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
Maybe there's such a thing as too much publicity.Not a single ticket remains unsold for for next week's "Homicide Live!," an annual opportunity to watch the show's actors perform in ways that have little to do with their TV personas. And thanks to advance word posted on the Internet, most of those $50 tickets were gone before folks here in Baltimore, where NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street" is taped, even knew they existed."All of a sudden, we started getting this avalanche of letters," says Megan Hamilton, program director for the Fells Point Creative Alliance, which draws about one-fourth of its annual pTC budget from "Homicide Live!"
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Barry Levinson's Bandits is coming to the Senator, where it belongs. Starting today, the new comedy directed by the Baltimore native starts a one-week run at the city's showcase theater. Owner Tom Kiefaber unsuccessfully tried to get Bandits when it opened, but kept pressing. A comedy about bank robbers (Bruce Willis and Billy Bob Thornton) that's garnered Levinson his best reviews in years. But as excited as Kiefaber is about Bandits, that's nothing compared to the elation he's feeling about what will follow.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
There's great fun to be had in seeing Michael Douglas and Kiefer Sutherland chew up the scenery (as well as their fellow actors) as Secret Service agents struggling to unravel a plot to assassinate the president. Too bad The Sentinel doesn't offer much more. Instead, the movie - based on a novel by Gerald Petievich - offers a setup that inexplicably goes away about halfway through, characters who seem to have missed much of their Secret Service basic training, atmosphere that doesn't really have to do with anything and way too many guys with machine guns within easy reach of the president of the United States.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 24, 2004
Spike Lee is 47 now, and he's been making movies since 1986, when She's Gotta Have It announced the arrival of his new and uniquely African-American voice to a Hollywood where voices of color had generally been ignored. Eighteen films and all sorts of critical accolades later, Lee is no longer the only African-American director in town; there's F. Gary Gray (The Italian Job); Antoine Fuqua (Training Day); the Hughes Brothers, Albert and Allen (From Hell); Clark Johnson (S.W.A.T.). Still, ask the average moviegoer to name a black filmmaker, and chances are Lee's is the only name that comes to mind.
FEATURES
By Robert Philpot and Robert Philpot,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 2003
Fans of the '90s TV show Homicide: Life on the Street will remember Clark Johnson as Meldrick Lewis, the funky, porkpie-hat-wearing detective who had a way with a laid-back one-liner. They might also note that they haven't seen much of him since the show left the air in 1999. That's because Johnson has been busier behind the camera. The actor has become a director, responsible for such quality TV as the premiere of The Shield and episodes of The Wire, Soul Food and The West Wing. This month, Johnson stepped up to the big screen - oddly enough, with a movie based on a TV show.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Barry Levinson's Bandits is coming to the Senator, where it belongs. Starting today, the new comedy directed by the Baltimore native starts a one-week run at the city's showcase theater. Owner Tom Kiefaber unsuccessfully tried to get Bandits when it opened, but kept pressing. A comedy about bank robbers (Bruce Willis and Billy Bob Thornton) that's garnered Levinson his best reviews in years. But as excited as Kiefaber is about Bandits, that's nothing compared to the elation he's feeling about what will follow.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2001
"Boycott," HBO's brilliant dramatization of the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott, does something that's almost impossible; it takes a national icon and shows us the man he was before he became the mythic image we know today. In showing us the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s humanity - with its hopes, fears and personal, everyday dreams - we appreciate the measure of the man's greatness all the more, while coming to understand our collective past in new and instructive ways. The 26-year-old King is at the center of "Boycott" as a young husband and father starting in a new job at a new congregation when Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Ala. Within days, King's journey from private family man to public figure and national voice of moral authority would begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | August 6, 2000
The chance to see Clark Johnson (a.k.a. Detective Meldrick Lewis of "Homicide") playing the role of a hit man wannabe would be enough to recommend "Deliberate Intent," a made-for-cable movie about a famous Maryland murder case premiering tonight on the FX Channel. But there's more: a strong performance by Academy-Award-winning actor Timothy Hutton in the lead, as well as a screenplay that intelligently illuminates one of the more important recent First Amendment cases. The film, based on a book of the same title by Rod Smolla, follows the story of a former Motown executive, Lawrence Horn (James McDaniel)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 19, 1998
In all our complaining about television, we forget how special a great series can be. If you feel like you need to be reminded in this season of network misery, make an appointment tonight to see "ER."The episode titled "The Good Fight" is a textbook on the hourlong drama: near-perfect point-counterpoint, plot-subplot writing and not a false note of acting. Noah Wyle has never been better, and Kellie Martin provides just the kind of pluck and enthusiasm needed to keep the story from getting too dark.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
An old friend returns to NBC, after far too many weeks away."NewsHour with Jim Lehrer" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- When MPT officials Wednesday announced plans for a half-hour public affairs show to debut in September, details were skimpy, save to say it would be patterned after this. See what we're in for. PBS."Unsolved Mysteries" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In a repeat from November, Robert Stack and Co. look at the death of Ruxton resident Susan Hurley Harrison, whose marriage NBC describes as resembling "The War of the Roses," the 1989 film in which Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner portray a couple for whom agreeing on a divorce is the least of their problems.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
He ran the orange gantlet in from center field in pre-game ceremonies, stroked a pair of crowd-pleasing hits and soaked up the roar of 46,733. Of all the new Orioles, Will Clark may have appreciated the roar of the Camden Yards crowd most."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 19, 1998
In all our complaining about television, we forget how special a great series can be. If you feel like you need to be reminded in this season of network misery, make an appointment tonight to see "ER."The episode titled "The Good Fight" is a textbook on the hourlong drama: near-perfect point-counterpoint, plot-subplot writing and not a false note of acting. Noah Wyle has never been better, and Kellie Martin provides just the kind of pluck and enthusiasm needed to keep the story from getting too dark.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.