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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1998
When Clark Gable first visited Baltimore in 1929 to perform in David Belasco's "Blind Window" at the city's Ford's Theater, nobody met him at Penn Station. No reporter requested an interview, and no photographs were taken. No fans mobbed him as he made his way to a Charles Street taxi.The Sun's drama critic wrote of his performance, "Clark Gabel does excellent work as convict No. 27." But having his name spelled wrong in the newspaper and the playbill wasn't the only indignity Gable suffered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2010
Victor Fleming would top everyone's list of all-time greats if historians rated moviemakers for the star power they ignited instead of directorial mystique. Don't get me wrong: I think Fleming should score high in every way, mystique included. The longer I worked on my biography, "Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master," the more convinced I became of Fleming's unique gift for visual storytelling. But even if you don't see how the same robust talent powered accomplishments as different as "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone With the Wind," you should be able to gauge the impact Fleming had on Hollywood by the performers he brought to peak stardom.
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NEWS
May 14, 1997
Jack Lewis Powell,88, an attorney for Hollywood celebrities who once prosecuted a woman for trying to extort money from Clark Gable, died of cancer Friday in San Diego.Pub Date: 5/14/97
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | July 5, 2009
The other night, I watched transfixed as a governor wrestled with a matter of conscience. There was family pressure, there was statehouse intrigue. In the end, at high personal cost, the guv decided to stick to principle and do the right thing. And then, the guv resigned. And that, my fellow Americans, is why I love the old black-and-white movies. No, I wasn't watching the continuing telenovela realidad starring in high-def the South Carolina guv telling all - or rather, all too much - about his affair in Argentina and his marriage back home, and his soul and its mate, and the lines he crossed and that thing that went a-sparking.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
Caroline Kirwan Warfield, a former Baltimore News-Post feature writer whose many exploits included appearing in a movie with Clark Gable and sailing aboard an old square-rigger through a ferocious North Atlantic storm, died of heart failure Saturday at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. She was 91. Born Caroline Garner Kirwan in Baltimore and raised in Bolton Hill, she was a 1929 graduate of the Greenwood School and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. She married Albert Gallatin Warfield in 1941 and lived for many years at Sunnyside Farm in Woodbine.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1996
Lawyers, aliens and talk-radio folks nothing but the best on TV tonight.* "Alien Nation: Millennium" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- "Can't we all get along?" Years before Rodney King, the folks at "Alien Nation" were asking much the same question through this series about beings from two planets forced to co-exist. The new sequel to the series, which went off the air in 1991, premieres with a built-in following that should ensure it a pretty good-sized audience. The series always had a clever premise, cleverly executed, so the movie -- essentially a crime story about a secret sect -- should be worth watching.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | September 17, 1998
Photographer Yousuf Karsh, now almost 90, has been one of the most successful portrait photographers in history. His subjects include presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the present British queen when she was Princess Elizabeth, artists Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso, movie stars Laurence Olivier and Clark Gable, scientist Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and writers Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway....
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | June 18, 2006
CLARK GABLE: THE SIGNATURE COLLECTION / / Warner Home Video / / $59.92 China Seas (1935) and Mogambo (1953), the two most entertaining movies of the six in Clark Gable: The Signature Collection, owe their existence to a movie that amazingly isn't in the box: Gable's breakthrough film, Red Dust (1932). The movie's screenwriter, John Lee Mahin, took credit with generations of historians for seeing Gable in Night Nurse (1931) and telling Red Dust producer, Hunt Stromberg, "There's this guy, my God, he's got the eyes of a woman and the build of a bull.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | December 1, 1993
IT IS astonishing how much there is to keep up with, and how little time there is to do it. A few people -- President Clinton comes to mind -- seem able to keep up with everything, but everybody else has to say, "Sorry, dear Loni, but life is too short."I pick Loni at random as a human metaphor for all those things I am unable to keep up with because of the time shortage. I might just as well have picked Michael Jackson or the Uruguay round of GATT negotiations.I have been not keeping up with GATT, always pronounced "Gat," since 1972.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | April 28, 1991
Longer ago than anyone alive remembers, the city's mai theater district lay on both sides of the Jones Falls down in a raffish part of town crowded with saloons, cheap clothing stores and ethnic eateries. It was frequented before the Civil War and for years afterward by a lighthearted set who rarely ventured to the respectable westside retail district around Howard and Eutaw streets -- let alone to the elegance of Mount Vernon.Those old days of the Holliday Street and the Front Street theaters died more than a century ago, when live theater took to the westside -- the area of upper Howard, Eutaw and Charles streets in the main.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2008
Victor Fleming, An American Movie Master By Michael Sragow Pantheon Books / 656 pages / $40 In filmmaking as in any art, God is in the details. If that's not the point of Michael Sragow's definitive biography of Victor Fleming (1889-1949), it's one of them. Another is that Fleming, a great though mostly forgotten film director, was a detail man - par excellence. Take the scene in which Clark Gable cried in Gone with the Wind, one of Fleming's hits.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | June 18, 2006
CLARK GABLE: THE SIGNATURE COLLECTION / / Warner Home Video / / $59.92 China Seas (1935) and Mogambo (1953), the two most entertaining movies of the six in Clark Gable: The Signature Collection, owe their existence to a movie that amazingly isn't in the box: Gable's breakthrough film, Red Dust (1932). The movie's screenwriter, John Lee Mahin, took credit with generations of historians for seeing Gable in Night Nurse (1931) and telling Red Dust producer, Hunt Stromberg, "There's this guy, my God, he's got the eyes of a woman and the build of a bull.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
It's not every day that a 17-year-old Cher flick can draw throngs of eager moviegoers. But then again, last Friday's screening of Moonstruck - the perennial kickoff of Little Italy's Open-Air Film Festival - was more than just any regular old event for more than 1,000 Baltimore area residents. People of every stripe - city dwellers, suburbanites, young and old - gathered under the stars and in the outdoor-cinema amphitheater (also known as the Da Mimmo Restaurant parking lot) for the showing of the 1987 romantic comedy at the sixth annual festival.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 24, 2003
William C. Nichols, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and University of Maryland official, died of cancer Saturday at Southern Maryland Hospital Center in Clinton. The Fort Washington resident was 83. Born in Hamilton, Mont., and raised in Lynden, Wash., he joined the Army Air Corps in 1940 and was later assigned to England. While stationed there, he met MGM film star Clark Gable, who was a member of his unit. "Clark Gable came to my parents' military wedding reception and danced with my mother," said Lauri Kemmerling, a daughter from Ewing, N.J. Family members said one of Mr. Nichols' tasks was notifying the next of kin when a member of his unit was killed or declared missing in action.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
Caroline Kirwan Warfield, a former Baltimore News-Post feature writer whose many exploits included appearing in a movie with Clark Gable and sailing aboard an old square-rigger through a ferocious North Atlantic storm, died of heart failure Saturday at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. She was 91. Born Caroline Garner Kirwan in Baltimore and raised in Bolton Hill, she was a 1929 graduate of the Greenwood School and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. She married Albert Gallatin Warfield in 1941 and lived for many years at Sunnyside Farm in Woodbine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | September 17, 1998
Photographer Yousuf Karsh, now almost 90, has been one of the most successful portrait photographers in history. His subjects include presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the present British queen when she was Princess Elizabeth, artists Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso, movie stars Laurence Olivier and Clark Gable, scientist Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and writers Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway....
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 24, 2003
William C. Nichols, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and University of Maryland official, died of cancer Saturday at Southern Maryland Hospital Center in Clinton. The Fort Washington resident was 83. Born in Hamilton, Mont., and raised in Lynden, Wash., he joined the Army Air Corps in 1940 and was later assigned to England. While stationed there, he met MGM film star Clark Gable, who was a member of his unit. "Clark Gable came to my parents' military wedding reception and danced with my mother," said Lauri Kemmerling, a daughter from Ewing, N.J. Family members said one of Mr. Nichols' tasks was notifying the next of kin when a member of his unit was killed or declared missing in action.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2010
Victor Fleming would top everyone's list of all-time greats if historians rated moviemakers for the star power they ignited instead of directorial mystique. Don't get me wrong: I think Fleming should score high in every way, mystique included. The longer I worked on my biography, "Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master," the more convinced I became of Fleming's unique gift for visual storytelling. But even if you don't see how the same robust talent powered accomplishments as different as "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone With the Wind," you should be able to gauge the impact Fleming had on Hollywood by the performers he brought to peak stardom.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 27, 1998
THERE ARE basically two types of Americans. There are those who positively adore "Gone With The Wind," the 1939 classic starring Clark Gable, Clark Gable's ears, Vivien Leigh, Hattie McDaniel and Butterfly McQueen, the latter in a role that made me seriously consider changing my ethnic designation to Hispanic.And then there are those of us who despise the just re-released film. Film-hating makes for strange bedfellows. I am now in the uncomfortable position of agreeing with WOLB-radio talk show host C. Miles on this one. In fact, we are in so much accord that the only point on which we could disagree is which one of us hates the film more.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1998
When Clark Gable first visited Baltimore in 1929 to perform in David Belasco's "Blind Window" at the city's Ford's Theater, nobody met him at Penn Station. No reporter requested an interview, and no photographs were taken. No fans mobbed him as he made his way to a Charles Street taxi.The Sun's drama critic wrote of his performance, "Clark Gabel does excellent work as convict No. 27." But having his name spelled wrong in the newspaper and the playbill wasn't the only indignity Gable suffered.
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