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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
  It isn't news that Anthony McGill is a masterful clarinetist, but his recital Sunday evening for Music in the Valley still surprised. The pristine technique, the breadth of tone coloring, the expressive richness of phrasing -- all of these gifts seemed more impressive than ever. The chief take-away from the concert is that the New York Philharmonic is awfully lucky. McGill, who has been co-principal clarinet of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade, was just appointed the Philharmonic's principal.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
  It isn't news that Anthony McGill is a masterful clarinetist, but his recital Sunday evening for Music in the Valley still surprised. The pristine technique, the breadth of tone coloring, the expressive richness of phrasing -- all of these gifts seemed more impressive than ever. The chief take-away from the concert is that the New York Philharmonic is awfully lucky. McGill, who has been co-principal clarinet of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade, was just appointed the Philharmonic's principal.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 7, 1996
The 30th season in the Shriver Hall Concert Series ended Sunday evening with a concert by the chamber music group Tashi. All the members -- clarinetist Richard Stoltzman, violinists Ida Kavafian and Theodore Arm, violist Steven Tenenbom and cellist Fred Sherry -- are distinguished musicians. But it is Stoltzman who is the brightest star in the constellation of Tashi (the word is Tibetan for "good fortune"), and the audience must have considered itself fortunate that every piece on the program featured him.Stoltzman was at his acrobatic and expressive best -- at least on the printed part of the program -- in Messiaen's "Intermede" (from "Quartet for the End of Time")
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
WQXR in New York reports that Anthony McGill, one of the most eloquent clarinetists of our day, will join the New York Philharmonic in September as principal. McGill has been co-principal clarinetist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade and a Peabody Conservatory faculty member since 2008. There is extra interest in the Philharmonic post since McGill is the third musician to be hired since the retirement, after six decades, of Stanley Drucker in 2009. The first two accepted the position, but subsequently changed their minds.
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
"It was all kind of frightening," Anthony McGill says of his part in the presidential inauguration Jan. 20. The clarinetist, who performs tomorrow night with the Peabody Concert Orchestra, was one of the four nearly frozen musicians who gave the virtual premiere of John Williams' "Air and Simple Gifts" on the West Front of the Capitol, just before Barack Obama was sworn in as president. As the whole world later discovered, those players - violinist Itzhak Perlman, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Gabriela Montero and McGill - played to a recording they had made a couple of days before.
FEATURES
December 8, 2005
Performance Cello and clarinet at An die Musik Tonight at 7:30, cellist Alexis Decharmes and clarinetist Nic olas Baldeyrou perform at An die Musik, 409 N. Charles St. The performance is co-spon sored by the Embassy of France. Tickets are $10-$15. Call 410-385-2638.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
John Pfeiffer, 75, who produced recordings by some of classical music's most famous artists, including Van Cliburn, Jascha Heifetz and Arturo Toscanini, in a 50-year career, died Thursday of a heart attack at his New York office.Affleck Gray, 89, a Scottish mountaineer, author and expert on the legendary Big Gray Man of Ben MacDhui, died Wednesday.The Rev. Frank C. Carr, 73, who gave up a publishing career to start a program for minority students, died Wednesday in Yuma, Ariz. Mr. Carr founded INROADS, a nonprofit college preparatory and career-development organization for minority students, in 1970.
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By Sally Buckler and Sally Buckler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1996
YOUNG MUSICIANS at Glenelg High School have been invited to perform in All-Eastern and All-State ensembles.Glenelg band director Barry Enzman says, "This is a huge honor."Two Glenelg students, trumpeter Leigh Bender and French horn player Katie Wise, will participate in the All-Eastern band at the Music Educators' National Conference in the spring.Leigh and Katie will also play in the Maryland Senior All-State Band, along with Glenelg's clarinetist Noah Smith and trumpeter Bryan Stepp.Bassist Samantha Johnston will play in the Maryland All-State Orchestra, and alto Kristina Vaskys and bass Brian Rice will sing in the Maryland All-State Chorus.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 27, 2002
The syncopated inflections of ragtime and jazz gave the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's program this week an extra kick. It provided a good opportunity to trace the influences of popular idioms on Igor Stravinsky and Aaron Copland, two giants who helped define classical music in the 20th century. Stravinsky's Ragtime, scored for 11 instruments, suggests a cubist take on Scott Joplin. Melodic fragments are tossed around, ending up in odd places and falling on odd beats; dynamic levels are quirky.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 2001
The most surreal event in music history must surely be the one that occurred in a prisoner-of-war camp known as Stalag 8A on Jan. 15, 1941. Five thousand soldiers, who had been fighting Nazi armies just months before, gathered to hear the premiere of a long, complex chamber work called "Quartet for the End of Time." It was written by one of their own, Olivier Messiaen, who was inspired to write the piece after he discovered a violinist, cellist and clarinetist in the camp. (He was the pianist.
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By Jada Vanderpool and Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Three Baltimore-area artists — a musician who has pioneered the use of the bass clarinet as a solo instrument and two sculptors — have been named winners of the 2014 Baker Artist Awards. The $25,000 juried prizes were conferred Thursday night during Maryland Public Television's "Artworks" program on clarinetist and composer Todd Marcus, on MICA-trained sculptor Brent Crothers, and on machinist and sculptor Chris Bathgate. The three will be feted at a May 12 reception at the WTMD-FM studios in Towson.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
In Peter Shaffer's wildly fanciful play “Amadeus,” the mediocre and oh-so jealous composer Salieri describes the moment he realized the genius of his nemesis - hearing a phrase in Mozart's Serenade for Winds that was “filled with such longing … it had me trembling.” Any Mozart fan is bound to have a similar example, some little moment of Mozart that seems impossibly beautiful, unusually affecting. For me, it comes in the Adagio of the Clarinet Concerto, when the soloist begins a tender descending melody that gets gently answered by the orchestra.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
Sidney S. Forrest, an esteemed clarinet teacher who had taught generations of students at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and the Levine School of Music in Washington, died Aug. 9 at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda of complications from injuries suffered in a fall. He was 94 and lived in Kensington. "I started studying with him when I was in high school in the 1950s and then when I went to Peabody, from which I graduated in 1963," said Christopher A. Wolfe, assistant principal clarinetist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
"It was all kind of frightening," Anthony McGill says of his part in the presidential inauguration Jan. 20. The clarinetist, who performs tomorrow night with the Peabody Concert Orchestra, was one of the four nearly frozen musicians who gave the virtual premiere of John Williams' "Air and Simple Gifts" on the West Front of the Capitol, just before Barack Obama was sworn in as president. As the whole world later discovered, those players - violinist Itzhak Perlman, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Gabriela Montero and McGill - played to a recording they had made a couple of days before.
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
Moments after Joe Biden is sworn in as vice president of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol and just before Barack Obama takes his oath as president, four classical musicians will perform a work created by John Williams for the history-rich inauguration. One of those players is Anthony McGill, principal clarinetist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and a newcomer to the Peabody Conservatory faculty. When he got the word last month that he would be participating in what might be considered the mother of all gigs, McGill's initial reaction was: "Wow, this is absolutely unbelievable.
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By Justin Fenton and June Arney and Justin Fenton and June Arney,Sun Reporters | June 8, 2008
Louis Ginsberg, a trumpeter for more than 60 years whose band played at President John F. Kennedy's inauguration, died Friday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 92. Mr. Ginsberg was born in Lynn, Mass., and moved to the Baltimore area when he was 10 years old. He graduated from City College in 1933. He started playing the trumpet in 1929, at age 13, and studied under musicians at the Peabody Conservatory and the National Symphony. From 1940 to 1941, he played trumpet with Don Bestor's Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2006
Write on The lowdown -- The second production of the 25th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival is a kind of anniversary celebration in its own right. The Past is Present, which opens tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, is a quartet of one-acts by veteran festival playwrights. The bill consists of: Willie Baby, a comedy by Joe Dennison, Carol Weinberg and Kimberley Lynne in which Shakespeare's agent shows up demanding royalties; Memory Garden and Wilderness, a pair of playlets by Mark Scharf that focus on loss and life in suburbia, respectively; and Miss Alice Plays by Rich Espey, a series of vignettes connected by references to an unseen kindergarten teacher.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
Hope Quackenbush, former managing director of the Baltimore Center for the Performing Arts, will receive the 1994 Achievement Award from the National Touring Theatre Council.The award honors Mrs. Quackenbush for her dedication and contribution to the theater industry. Other honorees include theatrical producers Fran and Barry Weissler and the general management offices of Gatchell and Neufeld.A founding member of the National Touring Theatre Council, Mrs. Quackenbush heads the Friends of the Performing Arts Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to constructing a performance space in the Mount Royal Cultural district.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2007
Albin J. Grden, a violinist, clarinetist and saxophonist who taught in Baltimore public schools for more than four decades and was a longtime member of the Baltimore City Municipal Park Band, died Aug. 30 of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 81. Mr. Grden was born in Baltimore into a musical family. His father, a Polish immigrant, played the violin, and his mother played and taught piano. "I guess Al started playing violin when he was 8 years old, and he'd practice, practice and practice," said a brother, Eugene C. Grden of White Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2006
Write on The lowdown -- The second production of the 25th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival is a kind of anniversary celebration in its own right. The Past is Present, which opens tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, is a quartet of one-acts by veteran festival playwrights. The bill consists of: Willie Baby, a comedy by Joe Dennison, Carol Weinberg and Kimberley Lynne in which Shakespeare's agent shows up demanding royalties; Memory Garden and Wilderness, a pair of playlets by Mark Scharf that focus on loss and life in suburbia, respectively; and Miss Alice Plays by Rich Espey, a series of vignettes connected by references to an unseen kindergarten teacher.
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