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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2000
It'll be "Mostly Mozart" at the Smith Theatre on Saturday evening when the Columbia Orchestra presents its third concert of the 1999-2000 season. But the welcome mat also will be out for a dashing visitor from Spain. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. with Mozart's graceful Symphony No. 32, the single-movement affair in G major that's more of a quick little overture than a full-length symphony. The program continues with Mozart's mellifluously melodic Clarinet Concerto, a supremely lyrical work written two months before the composer's death in 1791.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
In Peter Shaffer's wildly fanciful play “Amadeus,” the mediocre and oh-so jealous composer Salieri describes the moment he realized the genius of his nemesis - hearing a phrase in Mozart's Serenade for Winds that was “filled with such longing … it had me trembling.” Any Mozart fan is bound to have a similar example, some little moment of Mozart that seems impossibly beautiful, unusually affecting. For me, it comes in the Adagio of the Clarinet Concerto, when the soloist begins a tender descending melody that gets gently answered by the orchestra.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 27, 2002
The syncopated inflections of ragtime and jazz gave the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's program this week an extra kick. It provided a good opportunity to trace the influences of popular idioms on Igor Stravinsky and Aaron Copland, two giants who helped define classical music in the 20th century. Stravinsky's Ragtime, scored for 11 instruments, suggests a cubist take on Scott Joplin. Melodic fragments are tossed around, ending up in odd places and falling on odd beats; dynamic levels are quirky.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 27, 2002
The syncopated inflections of ragtime and jazz gave the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's program this week an extra kick. It provided a good opportunity to trace the influences of popular idioms on Igor Stravinsky and Aaron Copland, two giants who helped define classical music in the 20th century. Stravinsky's Ragtime, scored for 11 instruments, suggests a cubist take on Scott Joplin. Melodic fragments are tossed around, ending up in odd places and falling on odd beats; dynamic levels are quirky.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
In Peter Shaffer's wildly fanciful play “Amadeus,” the mediocre and oh-so jealous composer Salieri describes the moment he realized the genius of his nemesis - hearing a phrase in Mozart's Serenade for Winds that was “filled with such longing … it had me trembling.” Any Mozart fan is bound to have a similar example, some little moment of Mozart that seems impossibly beautiful, unusually affecting. For me, it comes in the Adagio of the Clarinet Concerto, when the soloist begins a tender descending melody that gets gently answered by the orchestra.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 22, 1991
When famous musicians die, there's usually a flurry of activity as the record companies try to release their final recordings. This is the case in the continuing efforts of Deutsche Grammophon to showcase the late Leonard Bernstein and Vladimir Horowitz, arguably the most popular conductor-composer and pianist of the second half of the 20th century.When Bernstein died, he left his second Mahler cycle -- there was an earlier one for CBS (now Sony) records -- uncompleted because he was not able to record the Symphony No. 8 (the "Symphony of a Thousand")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 17, 1996
According to Baltimore's musical grapevine, Jed Gaylin, the music director of the Hopkins Symphony, is doing great things with that community ensemble. Gaylin opens the orchestra's season Saturday at 8 p.m. in Shriver Concert Hall on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus.The program includes the overture to, and Act III interlude from, Verdi's "La Forza del Destino," Mozart's Symphony No. 41 ("Jupiter") and Carl Maria von Weber's Clarinet Concerto No. 1. Daniel Silver will be the clarinet soloist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | February 3, 2002
The next program from the Concert Artists of Baltimore, planned long before the September tragedy unleashed a fresh wave of patriotism, seems doubly appropriate now. This "American Sampler," conducted by Edward Polochick, offers quite a cross-section of the country's rich reservoir of music. Among the attractions will be Aaron Copland's Clarinet Concerto, with its exquisitely smooth, lyrical fusion of jazz and classical idioms; David Drosinos will be the soloist. And there will be a rare opportunity to hear Darker America, a 1924 symphonic poem by the great African-American composer William Grant Still, whose output has been absurdly neglected.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 25, 1993
The first three symphonies of Tchaikovsky are overshadowed by his blockbusters, the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth, but they are worthy pieces -- especially No. 1, titled "Winter Dreams."Gisele Ben-Dor and her Annapolis Symphony Orchestra made a nice case for Tchaikovsky's First Saturday night at Maryland Hall.The opening movements, "Reverie on a Winter Journey" and "Land of Gloom, Land of Mist," detail a rather bleak program but, as always in Tchaikovsky, there are enough spiky syncopations, waltzes, folk songs and good tunes to keep things from becoming too morbid.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2001
Annapolis and San Diego share the distinction of being the sailing capitals of their respective coasts. This weekend, they'll be sharing a conductor as well. Donald Barra, the founding music director of the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, will be in town tomorrow and Saturday evenings to guest-conduct the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in a program of Mozart, Haydn, Kodaly and Corigliano. A product of Eastern institutions like Columbia University and the Eastman and Juilliard Schools of Music, Barra has become quite a musical presence in San Diego.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2000
It'll be "Mostly Mozart" at the Smith Theatre on Saturday evening when the Columbia Orchestra presents its third concert of the 1999-2000 season. But the welcome mat also will be out for a dashing visitor from Spain. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. with Mozart's graceful Symphony No. 32, the single-movement affair in G major that's more of a quick little overture than a full-length symphony. The program continues with Mozart's mellifluously melodic Clarinet Concerto, a supremely lyrical work written two months before the composer's death in 1791.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 22, 1991
When famous musicians die, there's usually a flurry of activity as the record companies try to release their final recordings. This is the case in the continuing efforts of Deutsche Grammophon to showcase the late Leonard Bernstein and Vladimir Horowitz, arguably the most popular conductor-composer and pianist of the second half of the 20th century.When Bernstein died, he left his second Mahler cycle -- there was an earlier one for CBS (now Sony) records -- uncompleted because he was not able to record the Symphony No. 8 (the "Symphony of a Thousand")
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 16, 1991
Perhaps the best thing about my job is that I get to hear David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra perform the works of Mozart and Haydn. I don't know of another conductor who leads these composers with Zinman's insight or authority or of another orchestra that produces more satisfying results in these masterpieces.The opening of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto had what I think of as the Zinman trademark in this composer: a brisk pace, a fresh and spring-like rhythm and -- most important of all -- a perpetually singing line.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1997
Two of Anne Arundel County's long-running concert series closed their seasons last weekend on sharply different notes.Versatile banjoist Buddy Wachter presented a program Saturday that ranged from "Tiger Rag" to selections from "Fiddler on the Roof" for the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum. Renowned American bass Arthur Woodley's program for the Anne Arundel Community Concert Association included spirituals and European art songs.Woodley, who sang at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, was equally at home in German and Italian song, beginning with a trio of Robert Schumann's songs that included "Wanderung" and moving to a medley of Francesco Tosti's songs, including "A'Vucchella" and "Aprile."
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