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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | April 22, 2001
Dr. Claribel Cone gazes imperiously from a charcoal portrait in the Baltimore Museum of Art. In it, she possesses beauty that seems born of confidence, not perfection. Her wavy hair is pulled back, and from beneath dark slashes of brow, her eyes seem to gleam with intelligence. Nearby, her younger sister, Etta, is drawn in silhouette, her cheek soft and full, her head tilted as she looks quizzically to the side, as if waiting for someone else to finish speaking. Henri Matisse created both portraits.
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By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | August 10, 2008
There's no one right way to write a life story. You can arrange it in chapters or as a series of vignettes. You can present it with or without illustrations. You can approach it from the outside looking in, as found in most biographies. Or you can tell it from an interior perspective, as in most memoirs. But whatever you decide, you must make the people, who are the subjects, come alive. To do that, you must provide a sense of place. In the case of these three books, that place is, to a large or small extent, Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
FOR DECADES, sisters Etta and Claribel Cone collected everything from seashells to Cezannes inside their apartments at the Marlborough, overlooking Eutaw Place.Their rooms became so crowded with possessions that Claribel complained at one point she was "drowning in things."The sisters bequeathed their works by Matisse, Picasso, van Gogh, Renoir, Gauguin and others to the Baltimore Museum of Art. The museum's directors were so pleased they built an entire addition to display the collection and named it after the sisters -- the Cone Wing.
NEWS
November 15, 2004
On November 12, 2004, DORIS CLARIBEL (nee Donnelly) beloved wife of Donald Milton Denhard; loving mother of Denise Snyder and her husband Michael, Pamela Fruit and her husband Edgar; dear grandmother of Katherine, Sarah, David, Anne and Rachel Snyder, Steven, Daniel and Timothy Fruit; dear sister of Charles Donnelly and Eugenia Decker. A funeral service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A), on Tuesday at 1 P.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
September 29, 1996
The Cone Collection, which will have its first international showing this week in Japan, was amassed by two spinsters from Baltimore who lived in cramped rooms on Eutaw Place but loved to travel the world buying art.Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone were two of 13 children born to Helen and Herman Cone, who made a fortune with a Baltimore dry-goods business and later with cotton mills in Greensboro, N.C.Claribel, more outgoing and intellectually daring than her younger sister, pursued a medical career.
NEWS
November 15, 2004
On November 12, 2004, DORIS CLARIBEL (nee Donnelly) beloved wife of Donald Milton Denhard; loving mother of Denise Snyder and her husband Michael, Pamela Fruit and her husband Edgar; dear grandmother of Katherine, Sarah, David, Anne and Rachel Snyder, Steven, Daniel and Timothy Fruit; dear sister of Charles Donnelly and Eugenia Decker. A funeral service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A), on Tuesday at 1 P.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | April 22, 2001
The novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald said it best: "The rich are different from you and me." Claribel and Etta Cone were rich, they loved beautiful things, and they lived in great style. An invitation to visit the Cones' residence at the Marlborough Apartments on Eutaw Street was considered a privilege that those lucky enough to receive never forgot. Now, visitors to the newly renovated Cone Wing of the Baltimore Museum of Art can take a virtual stroll through the sumptuous private rooms where the sisters entertained their friends and displayed the magnificent art collection that bears their name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | June 23, 2002
A pair of proper Victorian ladies, sporting well-starched collars and wearing multiple layers of petticoats. Sitting in a Parisian brothel. Having tea with Pablo Picasso. Purchasing a sketch he'd made on the back of a brown paper bag. Discussing the finer points of cubism. Welcome to a day in the life of Claribel and Etta Cone, those tastefully eccentric sisters whose gift to their adopted city was one of the finest -- not to mention largest -- collections of impressionist art ever amassed by private collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Sports writing may be what Frank Deford is most widely known for -- a Sports Illustrated editor's urgent appeal for a farewell garland came to him, in Connecticut, the night of John Unitas' death. But more than half of Deford's 14 books so far have been novels. And it is in fiction that his momentum and skill increase. An American Summer (Sourcebooks, 256 pages, $24) is about a 14-year-old boy from Indiana whose father, with a new job as factory manager, moves the family to Baltimore. This is northern-suburb, propertied, private-school Baltimore -- Deford himself started there.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
More than one Cone collection was on view yesterday at the Baltimore Museum of Art. There was, of course, the collection of paintings and sculptures assembled during the early 20th century by Claribel and Etta Cone and given to the museum. But there also was a sizable collection of the Cone sisters' proud descendants: grand-nephews; great-grandnieces; great-great-grandnephews; even a 6-month-old great-great-great-great-grandniece. All in all, there were more than 100 paintings, sculptures and works on paper; plus 86 relatives from as far away as California and as nearby as North Baltimore at the museum to view and be viewed.
NEWS
By Jennifer M. Sims and Jennifer M. Sims,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2002
Brinton Jaecks strolls through the apartments of Etta and Claribel Cone - the famed art collectors and members of the Baltimore elite in the early 20th century. He passes Henri Matisse's famous Blue Nude hanging on the wall and picks up one of the sisters' personal journals and flips through it. Jaecks, a technical specialist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's Imaging Research Center, hasn't been transported through time. He's using an interactive virtual tour created by the UMBC center to supplement the Baltimore Museum of Art's Cone Collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Sports writing may be what Frank Deford is most widely known for -- a Sports Illustrated editor's urgent appeal for a farewell garland came to him, in Connecticut, the night of John Unitas' death. But more than half of Deford's 14 books so far have been novels. And it is in fiction that his momentum and skill increase. An American Summer (Sourcebooks, 256 pages, $24) is about a 14-year-old boy from Indiana whose father, with a new job as factory manager, moves the family to Baltimore. This is northern-suburb, propertied, private-school Baltimore -- Deford himself started there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | June 23, 2002
A pair of proper Victorian ladies, sporting well-starched collars and wearing multiple layers of petticoats. Sitting in a Parisian brothel. Having tea with Pablo Picasso. Purchasing a sketch he'd made on the back of a brown paper bag. Discussing the finer points of cubism. Welcome to a day in the life of Claribel and Etta Cone, those tastefully eccentric sisters whose gift to their adopted city was one of the finest -- not to mention largest -- collections of impressionist art ever amassed by private collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | June 17, 2001
Another decennial Pearl Harbor anniversary, another reissue of Gordon W. Prange's "At Dawn We Slept" from Penguin Books. The original, hard-cover publisher was McGraw-Hill, in 1981; the calculation is complex, but this 2001 edition apparently hoists the copies-in-print total up past half a million. It may or may not be the heftiest (889 pages, $20.95, softbound) general-reader book to have come out of the University of Maryland so far, but it is the most widely acclaimed. And "At Dawn We Slept" will very likely be out again in 2011.
NEWS
June 1, 2001
ADELYN DOHME Breeskin liked to say she was the first baby born (1896) in Roland Park. Soon after graduation from Radcliffe (now Harvard), she took a job in the prints department of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. She married a concert violinist, Elias Breeskin; after their divorce, she came back to Baltimore and raised their three daughters. In the Depression, she went to work at the Baltimore Museum of Art, again in prints. She was a Smooth, natural manager; in 1942, most of the men gone to war, Breeskin was promoted to acting director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | April 22, 2001
The novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald said it best: "The rich are different from you and me." Claribel and Etta Cone were rich, they loved beautiful things, and they lived in great style. An invitation to visit the Cones' residence at the Marlborough Apartments on Eutaw Street was considered a privilege that those lucky enough to receive never forgot. Now, visitors to the newly renovated Cone Wing of the Baltimore Museum of Art can take a virtual stroll through the sumptuous private rooms where the sisters entertained their friends and displayed the magnificent art collection that bears their name.
NEWS
June 1, 2001
ADELYN DOHME Breeskin liked to say she was the first baby born (1896) in Roland Park. Soon after graduation from Radcliffe (now Harvard), she took a job in the prints department of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. She married a concert violinist, Elias Breeskin; after their divorce, she came back to Baltimore and raised their three daughters. In the Depression, she went to work at the Baltimore Museum of Art, again in prints. She was a Smooth, natural manager; in 1942, most of the men gone to war, Breeskin was promoted to acting director.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF Library researcher Dee Lyon assisted with this article | May 30, 1998
Robert L. Berney, founder and president of a travel agency and an art enthusiast who wrote and lectured on Baltimore's legendary Cone sisters, died Thursday at Sinai Hospital from complications of a fall. The Owings Mills resident was 81.Mr. Berney was a great-nephew of the art-collecting Cone sisters and a great-great-grandson of Isaac Hamburger, who founded the Isaac Hamburger & Sons menswear business in 1850.He began his working career as a salesman in the late 1930s at a Hamburger's store at Baltimore and Hanover streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | April 22, 2001
Dr. Claribel Cone gazes imperiously from a charcoal portrait in the Baltimore Museum of Art. In it, she possesses beauty that seems born of confidence, not perfection. Her wavy hair is pulled back, and from beneath dark slashes of brow, her eyes seem to gleam with intelligence. Nearby, her younger sister, Etta, is drawn in silhouette, her cheek soft and full, her head tilted as she looks quizzically to the side, as if waiting for someone else to finish speaking. Henri Matisse created both portraits.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
More than one Cone collection was on view yesterday at the Baltimore Museum of Art. There was, of course, the collection of paintings and sculptures assembled during the early 20th century by Claribel and Etta Cone and given to the museum. But there also was a sizable collection of the Cone sisters' proud descendants: grand-nephews; great-grandnieces; great-great-grandnephews; even a 6-month-old great-great-great-great-grandniece. All in all, there were more than 100 paintings, sculptures and works on paper; plus 86 relatives from as far away as California and as nearby as North Baltimore at the museum to view and be viewed.
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