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By David Whitley and David Whitley,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 14, 2005
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - It's not easy becoming a British Open champion, but it shouldn't endanger the lives of bystanders. It did 10 years ago at the Old Course, when Ian Baker-Finch teed it up on perhaps the widest expanse of golfing grass on Earth. The shot should have been easier than hitting a ball into St. Andrews Bay. Finch missed the water, but he also missed the first fairway, the adjoining 18th fairway and Arnold Palmer coming up the latter fairway before the ball rolled next to a building and stopped.
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By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Tiger Woods is no stranger to success at the British Open, a tournament he's won three times in his career. He comes into the event having won three tournaments in his past seven, and has much to gain at the Open, including the world's No. 1 ranking, which could be his if he hoists the Claret Jug. The tournament is being held at the Royal Lytham & St. Anne's Golf Club, where it hasn't been hosted since 2001, one year after Woods won the British Open...
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SPORTS
July 21, 2006
Who will win the British Open? Only one player in the field can tame Royal Liverpool with his 2-iron stinger. He'll be the one wearing the red shirt and lifting the Claret Jug on Sunday. Thanks, Earl. Bill Leavy Millersville Royal Liverpool is going to be similar to playing 18 holes of golf on the parking lot at White Marsh Mall. I like Phil Mickelson sine he is the most imaginative shot-maker in the world plus he has a chip on his shoulder after Winged Foot. Bob Mulreaney Timonium
SPORTS
July 14, 2011
Westwood vs. Donald Bill Dwyre Los Angeles Times This 140th edition of The Open Championship, also known on the United States side of the pond as the British Open, will come down to a country-wrenching battle for the title between Lee Westwood and Luke Donald. The English will be torn. Their tabloids will wring their hands in indecision that will manifest itself in big, black wobbly headlines. Whom to root for? Which one is truly our lad? They are both Englishmen, of course, but which is more English than the other?
SPORTS
By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Tiger Woods is no stranger to success at the British Open, a tournament he's won three times in his career. He comes into the event having won three tournaments in his past seven, and has much to gain at the Open, including the world's No. 1 ranking, which could be his if he hoists the Claret Jug. The tournament is being held at the Royal Lytham & St. Anne's Golf Club, where it hasn't been hosted since 2001, one year after Woods won the British Open...
SPORTS
July 14, 2011
Westwood vs. Donald Bill Dwyre Los Angeles Times This 140th edition of The Open Championship, also known on the United States side of the pond as the British Open, will come down to a country-wrenching battle for the title between Lee Westwood and Luke Donald. The English will be torn. Their tabloids will wring their hands in indecision that will manifest itself in big, black wobbly headlines. Whom to root for? Which one is truly our lad? They are both Englishmen, of course, but which is more English than the other?
SPORTS
July 9, 2011
140th British Open When, where: Thursday-Sunday, Royal St. George's Golf Club, Sandwich, England. Course facts: 7,211 yards, par 70. The Open's first venue outside Scotland has hosted the championship 13 times. Format: 72 holes, stroke play. Field cut after 36 holes to top 70 and ties. Four-hole playoff, if necessary, immediately after final round. Field: 156 players (149 pros, 5 amateurs). Openings remain for the highest top-five finisher not yet qualified at both the John Deere Classic and Scottish Open.
NEWS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune newspapers | July 18, 2010
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — Louis Oosthuizen had made it to the weekend of a major championship just once before in his career, much less dealt with the anxiety of shouldering a lead overnight. And then he found himself challenged with about 29 hours of it. "There's just so much lying around you can do," he concluded. Nor did it help matters when the 27-year-old South African bogeyed Saturday's opening hole at St. Andrews. Here comes the letdown, many thought. But Oosthuizen never gave another stroke back to par, in fact, pulling together a 3-under 69 that left him with another chance to sleep on the British Open lead — four shots in front, and 18 holes from holding the claret jug. Maybe then folks will learn how to pronounce his name.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 9, 2011
In his 1959 novel "Goldfinger," Ian Fleming draws upon the peculiarities of Royal St. George's as a faintly disguised setting for a high-stakes golf match between James Bond and the diabolical Auric Goldfinger. British Open entrants, though, might be just as apt to guess the scene was part of "Moonraker. " "Lunar" is a popular word to describe the bumps and pockmarks that spatter the fairways on the southeast England linksland, frequently kicking an unsuspecting player's shot into waist-high heather — or worse.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2001
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England - Somewhere between his first tee shot and last putt yesterday at Royal Lytham and St. Annes, David Duval was struck by lightning on a perfectly sunny afternoon. It was strictly in a figurative sense, and it might have helped Duval win the first major championship of his star-crossed career. That it came during the final round of the 130th British Open made it all the better. "I think as much as anything, I realize that maybe even more so than Augusta in the past, you know what?
SPORTS
July 9, 2011
140th British Open When, where: Thursday-Sunday, Royal St. George's Golf Club, Sandwich, England. Course facts: 7,211 yards, par 70. The Open's first venue outside Scotland has hosted the championship 13 times. Format: 72 holes, stroke play. Field cut after 36 holes to top 70 and ties. Four-hole playoff, if necessary, immediately after final round. Field: 156 players (149 pros, 5 amateurs). Openings remain for the highest top-five finisher not yet qualified at both the John Deere Classic and Scottish Open.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 9, 2011
In his 1959 novel "Goldfinger," Ian Fleming draws upon the peculiarities of Royal St. George's as a faintly disguised setting for a high-stakes golf match between James Bond and the diabolical Auric Goldfinger. British Open entrants, though, might be just as apt to guess the scene was part of "Moonraker. " "Lunar" is a popular word to describe the bumps and pockmarks that spatter the fairways on the southeast England linksland, frequently kicking an unsuspecting player's shot into waist-high heather — or worse.
NEWS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune newspapers | July 18, 2010
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — Louis Oosthuizen had made it to the weekend of a major championship just once before in his career, much less dealt with the anxiety of shouldering a lead overnight. And then he found himself challenged with about 29 hours of it. "There's just so much lying around you can do," he concluded. Nor did it help matters when the 27-year-old South African bogeyed Saturday's opening hole at St. Andrews. Here comes the letdown, many thought. But Oosthuizen never gave another stroke back to par, in fact, pulling together a 3-under 69 that left him with another chance to sleep on the British Open lead — four shots in front, and 18 holes from holding the claret jug. Maybe then folks will learn how to pronounce his name.
SPORTS
July 21, 2006
Who will win the British Open? Only one player in the field can tame Royal Liverpool with his 2-iron stinger. He'll be the one wearing the red shirt and lifting the Claret Jug on Sunday. Thanks, Earl. Bill Leavy Millersville Royal Liverpool is going to be similar to playing 18 holes of golf on the parking lot at White Marsh Mall. I like Phil Mickelson sine he is the most imaginative shot-maker in the world plus he has a chip on his shoulder after Winged Foot. Bob Mulreaney Timonium
SPORTS
By David Whitley and David Whitley,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 14, 2005
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - It's not easy becoming a British Open champion, but it shouldn't endanger the lives of bystanders. It did 10 years ago at the Old Course, when Ian Baker-Finch teed it up on perhaps the widest expanse of golfing grass on Earth. The shot should have been easier than hitting a ball into St. Andrews Bay. Finch missed the water, but he also missed the first fairway, the adjoining 18th fairway and Arnold Palmer coming up the latter fairway before the ball rolled next to a building and stopped.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2001
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England - Somewhere between his first tee shot and last putt yesterday at Royal Lytham and St. Annes, David Duval was struck by lightning on a perfectly sunny afternoon. It was strictly in a figurative sense, and it might have helped Duval win the first major championship of his star-crossed career. That it came during the final round of the 130th British Open made it all the better. "I think as much as anything, I realize that maybe even more so than Augusta in the past, you know what?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Tiger Woods left here Sunday night with the Claret Jug he received for winning the 129th British Open and a feeling of sheer invincibility. How else would you feel if you'd won golf's past two major championships by a combined 23 strokes and secured your place in the game's lore by becoming the youngest player to complete a career Grand Slam? Jack Nicklaus knows that feeling. He was 26 when he finished off his career Slam in the 1966 British Open at Muirfield. It was the sixth of his record 18 major professional championships.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. - By the time the U.S. Open returns to the Pebble Beach Golf Links, Tiger Woods likely will have played another tournament - or five - with the same kind of domination he showed in winning this year's Open by a record-shattering 15 strokes. Given that it could be another decade before the Open comes back to the Monterey Peninsula, and the fact that he has won three majors at age 24, Woods might be looking to surpass what many figured would be an unbreakable record - the 18 professional majors belonging to Jack Nicklaus.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Tiger Woods left here Sunday night with the Claret Jug he received for winning the 129th British Open and a feeling of sheer invincibility. How else would you feel if you'd won golf's past two major championships by a combined 23 strokes and secured your place in the game's lore by becoming the youngest player to complete a career Grand Slam? Jack Nicklaus knows that feeling. He was 26 when he finished off his career Slam in the 1966 British Open at Muirfield. It was the sixth of his record 18 major professional championships.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. - By the time the U.S. Open returns to the Pebble Beach Golf Links, Tiger Woods likely will have played another tournament - or five - with the same kind of domination he showed in winning this year's Open by a record-shattering 15 strokes. Given that it could be another decade before the Open comes back to the Monterey Peninsula, and the fact that he has won three majors at age 24, Woods might be looking to surpass what many figured would be an unbreakable record - the 18 professional majors belonging to Jack Nicklaus.
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