Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClarence Darrow
IN THE NEWS

Clarence Darrow

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | June 20, 1993
THE PEOPLE VS.CLARENCE DARROW.Geoffrey Cowan.Times Books.544 pages. $27.50. This book is a bitter pill for anyone who dreamed of going to law school to become another Clarence Darrow -- and, save for William F. Buckley and Rush Limbaugh, who of us over 40 didn't?As with most medicine, however, we'll be better off for it. Heroes are even more compelling with a bit of clay on their feet, and in "The People vs. Clarence Darrow," Geoffrey Cowan demonstrates that the great crusading lawyer didn't always play by the rules.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Clarence Darrow had a carefully cultivated, aw-shucks persona that barely concealed an abrasive core. As a defense attorney, he was caught red-handed trying to bribe a juror to acquit two brothers accused of a bombing in which 21 people died. He treated the women in his life with callous disregard. It's an unlikely biography for a great American hero. "Performing this role is like peeling an onion," says actor Paul Morella. "After 10 years, I've just scratched the surface."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Clarence Darrow had a carefully cultivated, aw-shucks persona that barely concealed an abrasive core. As a defense attorney, he was caught red-handed trying to bribe a juror to acquit two brothers accused of a bombing in which 21 people died. He treated the women in his life with callous disregard. It's an unlikely biography for a great American hero. "Performing this role is like peeling an onion," says actor Paul Morella. "After 10 years, I've just scratched the surface."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 4, 2000
"When they started this fire here, they never figured it would light up the whole sky," says the defense attorney in the courtroom drama "Inherit the Wind." But despite a star-studded cast, the production at Ford's Theatre in Washington never generates much power. The problem doesn't lie in Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee's 40-year-old play. A fictionalized account of the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial, the play has not only proved itself decade after decade, but also still occasionally engenders controversy, as it did in our own back yard in the 1980s when Harford County tried to prohibit a middle-school production.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 4, 2000
"When they started this fire here, they never figured it would light up the whole sky," says the defense attorney in the courtroom drama "Inherit the Wind." But despite a star-studded cast, the production at Ford's Theatre in Washington never generates much power. The problem doesn't lie in Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee's 40-year-old play. A fictionalized account of the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial, the play has not only proved itself decade after decade, but also still occasionally engenders controversy, as it did in our own back yard in the 1980s when Harford County tried to prohibit a middle-school production.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
QUEENSTOWN -- Five years ago, Robert W. Kearns walked away from $30 million offered by Ford. Last week, he simply shrugged when he won $21 million from Chrysler.What Mr. Kearns wishes he had is the time he's lost.For 32 years, Mr. Kearns has relentlessly pursued automakers worldwide to get proper credit for inventing the intermittent windshield wiper. In the process, he saw his marriage collapse, suffered a nervous breakdown and consumed every waking moment steeped in lawsuits.Some -- even his daughter -- have questioned his sanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 9, 1997
"Never the Sinner," a play by John Logan about the 1924 Leopold and Loeb trial, opens tomorrow at the Rep Stage's Theatre Outback, the professional theater in residence at Howard Community College. A co-production with Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va., "Never the Sinner" is based, in part, on transcripts from the trial of the two wealthy Chicagoans who murdered a 14-year-old boy.Under Ethan McSweeney's direction, Jason Patrick Bowcutt and Michael Solomon star as the 19-year-old murderers, Nathan Leopold Jr. and Richard Loeb, and James J. Lawless plays their attorney, Clarence Darrow.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2004
DAYTON, Tenn. - In the same tense, humid courtroom where Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan battled over the teaching of evolution 79 years ago, eight county commissioners quickly rescinded yesterday an anti-gay motion that had drawn national attention - and ridicule - to Dayton again. The measure, which the commission passed unanimously Tuesday night, would have banned gays and lesbians from living in Rhea County and allowed prosecution of gays and lesbians for "crimes against nature."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 17, 1991
Laurence Luckinbill to star as Darrow in one-man showLaurence Luckinbill will perform in a one-man show, "Clarence Darrow," based on the life of the famed defense lawyer, at 8 p.m. Saturday as part of the Command Performance series at the University of Maryland at Baltimore's Medical School Teaching Facility, 10 S. Pine St. Admission is $8.Mr. Luckinbill's credits range from the title role in PBS' "Lyndon," about the late President Lyndon Johnson, to the movie, "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier," in which he played Sybok.
NEWS
July 1, 1991
Oliver Wendell Holmes once observed that the life of the law is not of logic but of experience. That being so, it is safe to say that Thurgood Marshall brought more authentic life into the musty halls of the Supreme Court than any of his fellow jurists.Marshall's experience was both bitter and sweet -- bitter, because he endured personally the cruelties of segregation and abuse; sweet, because as a result of his own Herculean efforts, that legacy was overcome, at least in a formal sense.Who can possibly fill the shoes of Justice Marshall, the liberal lion who is now retiring after 24 years on the high bench?
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | June 20, 1993
THE PEOPLE VS.CLARENCE DARROW.Geoffrey Cowan.Times Books.544 pages. $27.50. This book is a bitter pill for anyone who dreamed of going to law school to become another Clarence Darrow -- and, save for William F. Buckley and Rush Limbaugh, who of us over 40 didn't?As with most medicine, however, we'll be better off for it. Heroes are even more compelling with a bit of clay on their feet, and in "The People vs. Clarence Darrow," Geoffrey Cowan demonstrates that the great crusading lawyer didn't always play by the rules.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Everyman Theatre announced a 2009-2010 season that bucks a national trend by staging at least one large-cast show, and by increasing the theatrical "extras" available to customers. Highlights of the next subscription season include: * Rabbit Hole, Sept. 9-Oct. 11. The Baltimore premiere of David Lindsey-Abaire's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama is a harrowing look at how the death of a child can pull a family apart. * The Mystery of Irma Vep, Nov. 11-Dec. 13. This satire of penny dreadfuls by playwright Charles Ludlam will feature actor Bruce Nelson.
NEWS
May 30, 2006
Clarence Darrow once observed that the "law is a horrible business." The latest evidence of this can be found in the peculiar business of traffic citations on Maryland's military bases and other federal facilities. Thanks to a relatively new interpretation of law - hinged, oddly enough, on Maryland's definition of a public highway - a lot of traffic scofflaws are poised to get away with it. How did this happen? Well, it's a fairly complicated story, but the simple answer is that a decision in January 2005 by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals (and reaffirmed by the same court in a similar case last October)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.