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By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
With a little persistence -- and a crowd of Baltimore officials behind her -- a teacher at a school for the developmentally disabled says her students have won back the job of passing out major league All-Star ballots at Orioles' games.Students from the Claremont School in Northeast Baltimore helped pass out and collect the ballots in the stands at Monday night's game, said Nancy R. Malone, their teacher.Their presence in the stands was the result of a meeting with Orioles officials last month and an outpouring of support that Miss Malone drummed up from city officials and other supporters of the school.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
On any given day, the activity in Ellen Vikestad's classroom would resemble a round of bumper cars. As Vikestad and her special-needs students at Claremont High School have made their way from one end of her cramped classroom to the other for lessons, they do so in a 15-minute navigation of instruments, desks and one another. On Tuesday, officials from the Baltimore Teachers Union and the city school system surprised Vikestad with news: Soon that would change. Vikestad, in her fifth year of teaching music therapy at Claremont — a tiny school that offers a life-skills curriculum for its 61 students who are not pursuing diplomas — won the BTU Extreme Classroom Makeover contest, held every year by the local union and its parent organization, the American Federation of Teachers.
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NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
With a little persistence -- and a crowd of city officials behind her -- a teacher at a school for the developmentally disabled won back the job of passing out major league All-Star ballots at Orioles' games for her students.Students from the Claremont School in Northeast Baltimore helped pass out and collect the ballots in the stands at Monday night's game, said Nancy R. Malone, their teacher.Miss Malone is happy for her kids.But, she says, the Orioles community relations department is "not too happy with me; let's put it that way."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 27, 2009
Landis "Mac" MacIntosh, a retired information technologist and a former Federal Hill resident, died of kidney cancer Aug. 11 at his Claremont, Calif., home. He was 76. Mr. MacIntosh was born in Ashland, Ohio, and raised in Clifton, N.J. After graduating from Montclair State University in 1956 with a degree in business administration, he was commissioned an officer in the Marine Corps and served until 1958. He remained active in the reserves until 1963. He started his business career with Penn Mutual Insurance Co. in Philadelphia, and later was vice president of information technology from 1960 to 1980 at Scott Paper Co., also in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | April 3, 1992
With its downtown location and state-of-the-art design, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is sure to create a new, tonier image for the Baltimore Orioles.But as far as Nancy R. Malone is concerned, that upscale stuff is for the birds.Ms. Malone is a teacher at Claremont School, a public school for developmentally disabled students on Erdman Avenue in northeast Baltimore. For the past four seasons, a group of Claremont students volunteered to distribute and collect All-Star game ballots at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | April 3, 1992
With its downtown location and state-of-the-art design, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is sure to create a new, tonier image for the Baltimore Orioles.But as far as Nancy R. Malone is concerned, that upscale stuff is for the birds.Ms. Malone is a teacher at Claremont School, a public school for developmentally disabled students on Erdman Avenue in Northeast Baltimore. For the past four seasons, a group of Claremont students volunteered to distribute and collect All-Star game ballots at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
The remaining residents of the Claremont Homes public housing development are running out of time. They're already short of options. The 50 or so households left in the low-rise complex near the southern edge of Herring Run Park on Baltimore's east side are being told they've got to move soon - no one's saying exactly when - to make way for a $100 million mixed-income community that includes Claremont and the adjacent demolished Freedom Village apartments....
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
The veteran British actress Joan Plowright and relative newcomer Rupert Friend bring a subtle grace to Mrs. Palfrey at The Claremont, a quiet, restrained and largely delightful example of the sort of movies people say they don't make anymore. Plowright, never settling for grand gestures when a simple glance will do, is Sarah Palfrey, an aging widow casually ignored by her daughter and grandson. Not wanting to be a bother to anyone, she moves into a seen-better-days London hotel whose elderly residents find themselves in straits similar to hers: alone, neglected and living out their final days with whatever dignity they can muster.
NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | June 10, 1991
Inside the Claremont Public Housing Recreation Center, a few young boys toss a soccer ball into a plastic milk crate tied on a wall. It's the closest they can come to playing basketball, since the court outside has a broken backboard, and the boys don't have a basketball anyway.Other children color on the back of construction paper that has already been used once or twice. A young girl says she wants new pink paper for her "best picture of all," but there is no new paper for her to use.At Claremont, there is hardly anything new. Nor is there enough of what is available.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 4, 1993
Ask a typical comics fan how he or she feels about Marvel's Uncanny X-Men, and nine times out of 10 what you'll hear is unstinting praise.And no wonder. The X-Men -- atomic mutants who are spurned and discriminated against even as they apply their "X-Factor" powers to save mankind -- are among the most popular characters in comicdom. Yet what attracts readers to the mighty mutants isn't their amazing power, but the fact that there are complex and compelling characters beneath those bulging muscles and skintight supersuits.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
It was a tradition that began many years ago. About 50 Claremont Homes residents would gather every three months at the complex's auditorium for an extended family dinner. "The parents would have to come with their children and serve them," said Anna Warren, who has lived at the East Baltimore public housing development for 47 years. "We tried to show kids a different part of life. And they used to love it. We'd make chicken, roast beef, string beans, everything." It is one of the fondest memories of the community for Warren, who will be on hand today for the start of demolition on the 292-unit complex near Erdman Avenue and Sinclair Lane.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
The veteran British actress Joan Plowright and relative newcomer Rupert Friend bring a subtle grace to Mrs. Palfrey at The Claremont, a quiet, restrained and largely delightful example of the sort of movies people say they don't make anymore. Plowright, never settling for grand gestures when a simple glance will do, is Sarah Palfrey, an aging widow casually ignored by her daughter and grandson. Not wanting to be a bother to anyone, she moves into a seen-better-days London hotel whose elderly residents find themselves in straits similar to hers: alone, neglected and living out their final days with whatever dignity they can muster.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
The remaining residents of the Claremont Homes public housing development are running out of time. They're already short of options. The 50 or so households left in the low-rise complex near the southern edge of Herring Run Park on Baltimore's east side are being told they've got to move soon - no one's saying exactly when - to make way for a $100 million mixed-income community that includes Claremont and the adjacent demolished Freedom Village apartments....
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 28, 2004
SOMEWHERE IN God's heaven, where the angels sit in celestial puzzlement over Dominic "Mimi" DiPietro's enduring grammatical miracles, the great man's spirit gazes down and smiles. His friends haven't forgotten him. They'll gather at Mimi's old Claremont Street political club Thursday night to celebrate the upcoming centennial of his birth and raise a few bucks to spruce up his old East Baltimore neighborhood. Mimi's ghost will love it. After all, Mimi's the guy who once spent lunch with President Jimmy Carter, at Chiapparelli's Restaurant in Little Italy, and told the befuddled leader of the free world, "Mr. President, you gotta do something about them potholes in East Bawlamer."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 7, 2003
One-tenth of a second separated Johns Hopkins men's basketball team from a victory over Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in the consolation game of the Lopata Classic in St. Louis. Unfortunately for the Blue Jays, that was just enough time for the Stags to steal it away. Claremont forward Bryan Jolly rebounded a teammate's missed shot and put it back while being fouled with one-tenth of a second remaining to give the Stags (3-3) a 71-69 victory at the Washington University Field House yesterday.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1997
Until recently, a shopping trip meant a $12 ride in an unlicensed cab for 58-year-old Ersell Redd. For Addie Mae Edwards, 73, it meant a long walk and an aching back.But now the supermarket is a free bus ride away.Redd and Edwards are taking part in an innovative program designed to give senior citizens access to more than the corner convenience store.Run by the Baltimore Police Department and the city's Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, the regular trips offer safe transportation -- and access to meat, fruit and vegetables.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1991
Nurse Dorothy Elaine Whitehead walks into the classroom. She makes her way past students in wheelchairs and special medical seats, toward Shawn Coleman, 18, who lies on his right side, waiting for his lunch.Coleman was severely brain-damaged when hit by a car 13 years ago.Whitehead's presence makes him smile. She reaches under Coleman's shirt, finds his feeding tube and connects it to the intravenous bag holding his high-calorie formula.Whitehead is a school nurse whose job is in jeopardy because of state budget cuts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 27, 2009
Landis "Mac" MacIntosh, a retired information technologist and a former Federal Hill resident, died of kidney cancer Aug. 11 at his Claremont, Calif., home. He was 76. Mr. MacIntosh was born in Ashland, Ohio, and raised in Clifton, N.J. After graduating from Montclair State University in 1956 with a degree in business administration, he was commissioned an officer in the Marine Corps and served until 1958. He remained active in the reserves until 1963. He started his business career with Penn Mutual Insurance Co. in Philadelphia, and later was vice president of information technology from 1960 to 1980 at Scott Paper Co., also in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton opened his joint town meeting with House Speaker Newt Gingrich in Claremont, N.H., by declaring that in 1992 he had "spent some happy days here," you knew the audience was in for a heavy dose of blarney.Claremont in reality was the site of perhaps Bill Clinton's most distressing day of the 1992 campaign. It was there, at a local paintbrush factory, that he was ambushed by Gennifer Flowers' tell-all account of their relationship in a gossip tabloid. Reporters and cameramen besieged him, sending him into seclusion while his strategists plotted what to do.Clinton survived that Claremont visit by going before the cameras of "60 Minutes" with wife Hillary and denying the Flowers affair while acknowledging past marital difficulties.
NEWS
By Walter S. Orlinsky | August 19, 1994
I MISSED former City Council member Mimi DiPietro's funeral last week because I was sick; for two days I had been running a fever and I just couldn't get out of bed. In part, I think Mimi's passing actually made me feel even weaker than I was, because it marked the end of an era. In truth, Mimi's electoral loss a few years back was the end, but death is the absolute arbiter of time.I had to cringe when I read The Evening Sun's editorial lament of Mimi's passing. Oh, it was sweet and nice and very much to the point.
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