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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 26, 2003
I FINALLY SAW the new Lord of the Rings movie, which is entitled Lord of the Rings II: A LOT More Stuff Happens. It's a tad on the long side (three days), but I am not complaining. My eyeballs were literally riveted to the screen, by literal rivets, from the moment I sat down until the moment I lost all sensation in my lower body. Yes, this is a classic movie, the kind that makes you laugh; makes you cry; makes you wonder, over and over, if this would be a good time to go to the bathroom.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
This week, Watchdog brings you updates on some previously unresolved problems. Update: A bench has been replaced at a Randallstown bus stop. Roslyn DeGraffinreid called to thank Watchdog last month because a broken wooden bench in the 9100 block of Liberty Road has been replaced. DeGraffinreid works nearby and waits for the bus at that stop after tiring shifts at a nursing home. "You all called the right people and now it's fixed so we can get to sit down," she said in a message to Watchdog.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 18, 1994
"Meet Me in St. Louis" doesn't present its audiences with as much of the eye-popping talent as we've seen from the Children's Theatre of Annapolis in the past, but that is the nature of the enterprise.Many scrupulously trained CTA leads of recent years -- especially the male ones -- have moved on to college, leaving behind a nucleus of very young talent that will become the experienced stars of tomorrow.How young? Two-thirds of the "St. Louis" cast is 15 or younger. But, boy, are they getting on-the-job training in this show!
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 8, 2004
Reality TV works well when it tells a deeper story than merely that of a contest. It works even better when the tale rubs up against viewers' core values and beliefs. The wildly popular American Idol, which made instant stars out of Kelly Clarkson and Ruben Studdard, simultaneously celebrates and quashes the democratic notion that talent will be rewarded. The Simple Life, which last month became the hottest new series on network television, validates and tweaks our ideas about social status by allowing middle-class viewers to feel superior to members of upper and lower classes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | March 28, 1992
Clang, clang, clang went the trolley, and hundreds of Baltimoreans eager for a free ride climbed on board yesterday.It was the last of three days of "orientation" rides offered by the Mass Transit Administration to acquaint people with the new light-rail service."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | August 28, 1997
COMMANDER'S log, Mir space station, personal and confidential:May 17: Oops! While handing a butter knife to American astronaut Mike Foale at breakfast, I accidentally sliced both lines to his oxygen supply.Flight engineer Alexander Lazutkin and I laughed. If you could have seen Mike sitting there bug-eyed, frantically waving his arms at me as if to say -- "Vassily, I cannot breathe! I cannot breathe!"Oh, please! It was very funny.Greetings to Mother Russia!May 22: Good news! After four days of darkness, we have lights again!
FEATURES
By Kevin Sherrington and Kevin Sherrington,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | May 28, 1996
Nearly 40 years ago, a team of U.S. audiologists ventured into central Africa to test an old theory. They wanted to see if people who had never heard the shriek of a siren or the roar of a foundry or the clang, clang, clang of a trolley were all the better for it.The conclusion: Even the oldest members of the Mabaan tribe had better hearing than the average U.S. teen-ager.And the postscript: The loudest, most obnoxious noise the Mabaan hear is the harvest dance of their young people.And so it goes.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 8, 2004
Reality TV works well when it tells a deeper story than merely that of a contest. It works even better when the tale rubs up against viewers' core values and beliefs. The wildly popular American Idol, which made instant stars out of Kelly Clarkson and Ruben Studdard, simultaneously celebrates and quashes the democratic notion that talent will be rewarded. The Simple Life, which last month became the hottest new series on network television, validates and tweaks our ideas about social status by allowing middle-class viewers to feel superior to members of upper and lower classes.
NEWS
By STORY BY GADY A. EPSTEIN and STORY BY GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
Yellowrose Court woke up to the trouble one night a few summers back. As midnight approached, an 11-year-old boy sidled up to a light pole, aluminum bat in hand. Clang! Clang! Clang! The impact sent vibrations up the metal pole, bursting the filament. Jolted awake, Alan Feinstein looked outside and recognized the kid. A neighbor. "When the lights go out on Yellowrose, that's when you know drugs are changing hands," says Feinstein, 47. "That's when you know there's trouble." For decades, Yellowrose was just another block of young families in townhouses, a symbol of the diversity, upward mobility and community spirit that made the planned city of Columbia a national model.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
Among the great improvements of recent years in Baltimore have been the water taxis that now criss-cross the Inner Harbor. Business is so good that a keen rivalry has developed among various operators. Now comes the idea of building a 1.5-mile streetcar line around the harbor from Federal Hill to Little Italy.This is the vision of an energetic group of museum and streetcar enthusiasts. They think an old-fashioned streetcar line could do wonders to Baltimore's tourism industry.Ultimately, they say, privately-run streetcars could fill a gap in the state Mass Transit Administration's network by linking up with both the light-rail and Metro systems.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 26, 2003
I FINALLY SAW the new Lord of the Rings movie, which is entitled Lord of the Rings II: A LOT More Stuff Happens. It's a tad on the long side (three days), but I am not complaining. My eyeballs were literally riveted to the screen, by literal rivets, from the moment I sat down until the moment I lost all sensation in my lower body. Yes, this is a classic movie, the kind that makes you laugh; makes you cry; makes you wonder, over and over, if this would be a good time to go to the bathroom.
NEWS
By STORY BY GADY A. EPSTEIN and STORY BY GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
Yellowrose Court woke up to the trouble one night a few summers back. As midnight approached, an 11-year-old boy sidled up to a light pole, aluminum bat in hand. Clang! Clang! Clang! The impact sent vibrations up the metal pole, bursting the filament. Jolted awake, Alan Feinstein looked outside and recognized the kid. A neighbor. "When the lights go out on Yellowrose, that's when you know drugs are changing hands," says Feinstein, 47. "That's when you know there's trouble." For decades, Yellowrose was just another block of young families in townhouses, a symbol of the diversity, upward mobility and community spirit that made the planned city of Columbia a national model.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2000
You might remember that Thomas Hobbes, the not very optimistic political theoretician of 17th-century Britain, described human life in its natural state as "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short." I couldn't help but recall Hobbes' description as I listened to pianist Dickran Atamian play Mozart's 23rd Piano Concerto with Leslie Dunner's Annapolis Symphony Orchestra on Saturday. It was a solitary performance because the pianist was in a world of his own, seemingly unaware that Mozart had imbued the score with grace and poetry, and that the orchestra was doing its best to convey the composer's intentions.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | August 28, 1997
COMMANDER'S log, Mir space station, personal and confidential:May 17: Oops! While handing a butter knife to American astronaut Mike Foale at breakfast, I accidentally sliced both lines to his oxygen supply.Flight engineer Alexander Lazutkin and I laughed. If you could have seen Mike sitting there bug-eyed, frantically waving his arms at me as if to say -- "Vassily, I cannot breathe! I cannot breathe!"Oh, please! It was very funny.Greetings to Mother Russia!May 22: Good news! After four days of darkness, we have lights again!
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Life wasn't pretty in 12th-century England, but the women sure were.Part 3 airs Tuesday, 9 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-3 a.m.Pub Date: 4/19/97
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1997
The robin's call. The whisper of lovers. The furious clank of aluminum bats.They are the sounds of spring. And for those who play ball for love rather than money -- for whom a few good swings havenearly the restorative powers of a week in Florida -- only the song of baseball counts."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
This week, Watchdog brings you updates on some previously unresolved problems. Update: A bench has been replaced at a Randallstown bus stop. Roslyn DeGraffinreid called to thank Watchdog last month because a broken wooden bench in the 9100 block of Liberty Road has been replaced. DeGraffinreid works nearby and waits for the bus at that stop after tiring shifts at a nursing home. "You all called the right people and now it's fixed so we can get to sit down," she said in a message to Watchdog.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | July 9, 1991
What John Waters did for pink flamingos, what Barry Levinson did for diners, Baltimore's Carl R. Schultz wants to do for trolley cars.By his own reckoning, the 48-year-old Baltimore resident, who has a bushy salt-and-pepper beard and wire-rim glasses, is one of only a few video-filmmakers in the United States specializing in mass transit documentaries.The UCLA film school graduate once managed "Godfather" director Francis Ford Coppola's American Zoetrope film studio facilities in San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Kevin Sherrington and Kevin Sherrington,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | May 28, 1996
Nearly 40 years ago, a team of U.S. audiologists ventured into central Africa to test an old theory. They wanted to see if people who had never heard the shriek of a siren or the roar of a foundry or the clang, clang, clang of a trolley were all the better for it.The conclusion: Even the oldest members of the Mabaan tribe had better hearing than the average U.S. teen-ager.And the postscript: The loudest, most obnoxious noise the Mabaan hear is the harvest dance of their young people.And so it goes.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 1995
CAIRO -- Pity poor Ramses the Great.He was the last of the great pharaohs, hero in the defeat of the Hittites, builder of awesome temples at Abu Simbel and Karnak, father to 52 sons and only-the-Sun-god-knows how many daughters, ruler over an empire that stretched to Syria.Now his stoic likeness stands under a neon SPORT COLA sign at an intersection where pollution is worst in a city where pollution is bad all over. The granite statue of Ramses II is hemmed by electric lines, coated with soot, assaulted by car exhaust, overshadowed by a freeway overpass on one side and clanging trolley lines on another.
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