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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
The September issue of "Every Day with Rachel Ray" takes a look at nine of the best “Little Italys” in the United States, and Baltimore's own Little Italy is among them. In the magazine's big Italian issue, which comes out on Tuesday, Ray says, "Baltimore's Little Italy, a pocket of cozy brick buildings, feels like home. " She directs readers to Germano's “for a Taste of Tuscany, the home of owner Germano Fabiani” and declares the “iconic dish” of Baltimore's Little Italy to be clams casino.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
The September issue of "Every Day with Rachel Ray" takes a look at nine of the best “Little Italys” in the United States, and Baltimore's own Little Italy is among them. In the magazine's big Italian issue, which comes out on Tuesday, Ray says, "Baltimore's Little Italy, a pocket of cozy brick buildings, feels like home. " She directs readers to Germano's “for a Taste of Tuscany, the home of owner Germano Fabiani” and declares the “iconic dish” of Baltimore's Little Italy to be clams casino.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 7, 1991
The FisheryWhere: 1717 Eastern Ave., Fells Point.Hours: Open 11:30 a.m. to midnight Mondays to Thursdays, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Sundays.Credit Cards: AE, CB, DC, MC, V.Features: seafood, Spanish cuisine.Non-smoking section? Yes.Call: 327-9340.** 1/2We liked everything on our plates at the Fishery. The seafood was fresh and abundant. Oysters were available, even out of season, and were enormous. Lump crab was laid on with a generous hand.So what's the problem?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
How old-fashioned is Lewnes' Steakhouse? The best appetizers are shrimp scampi and clams casino, the most desirable side dish is potatoes Lyonnaise, and the bar still makes a Manhattan with two parts whiskey to one part vermouth, and no one does that anymore. Without any drama, Lewnes' serves its regulars a plain and proper dinner of exquisite steak. Imagine the Prime Rib mixed with the old Burke's, and you'll have a rough picture of Lewnes', a corner landmark in the cozy Eastport neighborhood of Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
How old-fashioned is Lewnes' Steakhouse? The best appetizers are shrimp scampi and clams casino, the most desirable side dish is potatoes Lyonnaise, and the bar still makes a Manhattan with two parts whiskey to one part vermouth, and no one does that anymore. Without any drama, Lewnes' serves its regulars a plain and proper dinner of exquisite steak. Imagine the Prime Rib mixed with the old Burke's, and you'll have a rough picture of Lewnes', a corner landmark in the cozy Eastport neighborhood of Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | December 16, 1999
In dining, as in life, it's the little things that count. No matter how brightly one or two entrees may shine, the restaurant that doesn't attend to the niggling details will not leave its customers glowing.It's a lesson relearned recently at JazNicks', a restaurant and lounge in Essex. Despite the restaurant's name, JazNicks' dining room is not terribly jazzy. It's an old-fashioned kind of place, decorated with pastels and carousel horses. Its menu features traditional American fare with an emphasis on seafood.
NEWS
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
B J'S NORTHWhere: 75th Street and the bay, (410) 524-7575Hours: Dinner served daily 4 p.m. to midnightCredit cards: All major cardsA spectacular sunset fed our souls, and good food at B J's on the Water North fed our weary bodies.We should have known better than to venture into a popular Ocean City restaurant on a Saturday evening, but the incredible sunset was worth it.At first, we were dismayed by the cramped, loud interior dining room. During our lengthy wait for a table, we had time to discover the pleasant deck, and put in a request for a seat outside.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 21, 1991
LITTLE BUTCHER BOY MEAT MARKET 9725 York Road, York Village Shopping Center. Open: 8 a.m. to 7 Mondays to Wednesdays and Saturdays; 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. Call (410) 628-1828. Fax (410) 628-1677. Don't let the name fool you; this is not an ordinary meat market. How do homemade rolls and sandwich breads sound? Or perhaps Clams Casino ($4.99 for 8), Oysters Rockefeller ($4.99 for six) or homemade crab soup ($2.99 a pint)?I originally stopped at the market to buy back fin crab meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2009
Kolpers is that roadhouse restaurant you see, and wonder about, whenever you're biking, hiking or driving the back way into Hampden or Woodberry. It turns out that's the backside view of Kolpers, from which it looks like a small-town party palace. Approached from the front, though, Kolpers looks more like a place you'd go for a quiet sit-down dinner. This makes Kolpers a mullet restaurant ("business in the front, party in the back"), and a little bit frustrating, too. There is a bar world here and a dining world, and they feel disconnected, although they don't have to be. The bar, even early on a weeknight, feels like a friendly hangout for regulars, with folks around the bar enjoying light fare - quesadillas, burgers and ribs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2002
AS FAR AS surf-and-turf places go, 152 Seafood Restaurant in Fallston is better than average. The comprehensive menu offers the things you'd expect to find in such a place. Just about everything we tried - from sides to appetizers to entrees - tasted good. Service was solicitous. The overall look was relaxing and extremely neat, albeit unimaginative. All those things aside, I'd return here because of the wonderful sense of control you get. You pick the kind of fish you want (including flounder, salmon, tuna, rockfish, swordfish and orange roughy)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2009
Kolpers is that roadhouse restaurant you see, and wonder about, whenever you're biking, hiking or driving the back way into Hampden or Woodberry. It turns out that's the backside view of Kolpers, from which it looks like a small-town party palace. Approached from the front, though, Kolpers looks more like a place you'd go for a quiet sit-down dinner. This makes Kolpers a mullet restaurant ("business in the front, party in the back"), and a little bit frustrating, too. There is a bar world here and a dining world, and they feel disconnected, although they don't have to be. The bar, even early on a weeknight, feels like a friendly hangout for regulars, with folks around the bar enjoying light fare - quesadillas, burgers and ribs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2006
Darren Petty, who owns the Natty Boh Lounge and Canton Station with Charley Alfred, said he's been a National Bohemian fan since he was a young man. Short on cash, he chose the famed Baltimore-brewed beer not because of its taste, though it's not bad at all, but because it was cheap - "$3.50 a case warm, four bucks cold." Natty Boh is no longer brewed in Baltimore, but the love affair between the city and the the beer continues, thanks in part to Petty and Alfred. The mustachioed, circle-headed Natty Boh logo now winks from the walls of the Natty Boh Lounge, which opened in November on the second and third floors above Canton Station.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 28, 2005
That neon Natty Boh guy up on the hill in Canton has a little something more to wink about these days. He's got a brand-new hangout named in his honor. The Natty Boh Lounge recently opened on Conkling Street, right above the Canton Station bar. And the place is packed with Bawlmer history. Co-owner Darren Petty, a lifelong Canton/Highlandtown resident, says the building itself was built in 1886, around the same time the National Bohemian brewery was built across the street. In fact, he says, it was the boardinghouse for some of the Natty Boh brewmasters.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 16, 2005
Another popular D.C. eatery has come to Baltimore. The Oceanaire Seafood Room opened just last weekend in the new Spinnaker Bay Building in Fells Point East (or is it Inner Harbor East? At any rate, it's in the area at the foot of President Street, where all that new construction has been going on). This is No. 8 in the upscale restaurant group, with other locations in Minneapolis, Seattle, Dallas, Indianapolis, San Diego, Atlanta and the aforementioned D.C. The Web site describes Oceanaire as feeling like a 1930s ocean liner.
NEWS
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2005
Before the iPod, before color TV, even before cars were common, a log hunting lodge stood where U.S. 40 traffic now rushes past in Ellicott City. It was the early 1900s, and the lodge no doubt looked right for its times. A century later, the building is the Blue Pointe Grille and seems a little out of place between a fast-food joint and a hot-tub store - out of place, but interesting amid all the bland-box retail. And the building is interesting. Though it started as a hunting lodge, it has also been a Chinese restaurant and a place called Pirate's Cove.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2002
AS FAR AS surf-and-turf places go, 152 Seafood Restaurant in Fallston is better than average. The comprehensive menu offers the things you'd expect to find in such a place. Just about everything we tried - from sides to appetizers to entrees - tasted good. Service was solicitous. The overall look was relaxing and extremely neat, albeit unimaginative. All those things aside, I'd return here because of the wonderful sense of control you get. You pick the kind of fish you want (including flounder, salmon, tuna, rockfish, swordfish and orange roughy)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | May 28, 1993
Bo BrooksWhere: 5414 Belair RoadHours: Mondays through Fridays, 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5 p.m. to 9:30 or 10 p.m.; Saturdays, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays, 3:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.Credit cards accepted: Major credit cardsFeatures: SeafoodNon-smoking section? YesCall: (410) 488-8144Prices: Appetizers, $2-$6.95; entrees, $4.95-$14.95** 1/25/8 Somewhere along the line Bo Brooks went from being a neighborhood crab house to big business. How can you tell? Well, when the waiters and waitresses all wear T-shirts that say "Bo Knows Crabs," that's a clue.
FEATURES
By JANICE BAKER | January 26, 1992
When I was young and foolish, I acted in an amateur stage production of "Under Milkwood," a 1950s radio drama by Dylan )) Thomas. One character in it haunted me -- Mae Rose Cottage, who boasted, "I'm fast. I'm a bad lot. I'll sin until I blow up!" How? I've thought. What sins blow you up? Are they worth the trouble? These are questions life has only occasionally addressed, and when it has, the answers seem crazy. The other night, for example, martinis and rare beef at the Prime Rib felt like sin. Are they what Mae Rose had in mind?
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 4, 2001
Rarely do restaurants upmarket their looks and downmarket their food. The last time I was at Hunters' Lodge, a log cabin on the edge of a busy highway in Ellicott City, the interior had a cozy rusticity that belied its haute contemporary American cuisine. Now it's become the Blue Pointe Grille -- a name with a few too many e's -- and it looks like the library of someone's upscale vacation home. Oriental-style rugs line the floor, shelves are filled with books and a fire burns merrily in the fireplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2001
THE SHRIEKING child at the table behind ours at Pappas was one of the only things out of place in an evening that felt like a dream about childhood. You open the door to the Taylor Avenue restaurant, walk up a few stairs and step back about 30 years. Brass sconces give off the medium-dull light that illuminated another era. A triangular fireplace that Mike Brady might have designed is set in a wall of tan bricks. The Muzak version of the Sinatra staple "Love and Marriage" plays in the background.
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