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By Peter M. Nichols and Peter M. Nichols,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2003
A Terminator movie?" exclaims Claire Danes in a documentary about the making of Jonathan Mostow's film Terminator 3: The Rise of the Machines. Accustomed to quieter roles, Danes says she was changing planes in Los Angeles when to her amazement she was suddenly offered the role of Kate Brewster, a veterinarian who gets bounced around in the back of speeding vans while a 20-year-old machine called the terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) battles a building-wrecking blonde called T-X (Kristanna Loken)
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Baltimore was again front and center at the Emmy Awards telecast, with two major comedy awards going Sunday night to HBO's "Veep," the locally made series starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer. Louis-Dreyfus, the most honored comedy actress in TV history, won as best actress in a comedy for the second year in a row, while Tony Hale grabbed the Emmy as best supporting actor. "House of Cards," which is also made in Maryland, won the Emmy for best direction in a drama series for the work of David Fincher in Episode 1 of the groundbreaking Netflix political thriller.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 22, 2004
Stage Beauty is about the wonder of live theater and the inevitability of change, about the tragedy of becoming obsolete and the danger of getting what you wish for, about the transcendence of art and the banality of those who think they can dictate its terms. It is also set about three centuries too early and is only about half as scandalous as its makers think it is. That's a lot to draw from a small, 110-minute movie, but how else can one react to a story that traces the origin of method acting to the 17th century, forces Claire Danes to flash her breast to prove to the world she's a woman and hinges on the whims of a foppish king who makes the right call for the wrong reasons?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
Talk about a TV series keeping current with the news. Thirty seconds into the Season 2 opener of Showtime's “Homeland,” viewers see the first image of an American embassy under attack in the Middle East. At just over two minutes into the episode, American and Israeli flags are burned as U.S. officials are threatened by an angry mob surrounding the embassy compound. It's our embassy in Beirut, not the consulate in Benghazi, that's under attack. And the reason for the mob in “Homeland” is an Israeli bombing of Iranian nuclear reactors - not a film that offended Muslims or a targeted attack, depending on which administration official you are listening to at any given moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
Talk about a TV series keeping current with the news. Thirty seconds into the Season 2 opener of Showtime's “Homeland,” viewers see the first image of an American embassy under attack in the Middle East. At just over two minutes into the episode, American and Israeli flags are burned as U.S. officials are threatened by an angry mob surrounding the embassy compound. It's our embassy in Beirut, not the consulate in Benghazi, that's under attack. And the reason for the mob in “Homeland” is an Israeli bombing of Iranian nuclear reactors - not a film that offended Muslims or a targeted attack, depending on which administration official you are listening to at any given moment.
FEATURES
September 19, 2005
How the stage world is portrayed on screen is the theme of Towson University's "Theater and/As Film" series, running Monday nights through Dec. 5. Tonight's offering is last year's Stage Beauty, starring Billy Crudup as Edward "Ned" Kynaston, a 1660s actor known for his skill in playing women's roles. When Charles II suddenly allows women to play these roles, Kynaston's life turns upside-down. Claire Danes also stars. The film screens at 7:30 tonight at Towson University's Van Bokkelen Hall, 8000 York Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2005
LOOK FOR FULL REVIEWS IN TOMORROW'S MOVIES TODAY SECTION Chicken Little This latest animated effort from Disney, the first since the studio abandoned traditional in favor of computer animation, is the tale of a socially outcast chicken with a credibility problem - no one, not even his dad, believes him when he insists the sky is falling. G. Jarhead Sam Mendes (American Beauty) directs Jake Gyllenhaal as a Marine serving in the Mideast during the first war with Iraq. R. MirrorMask A young girl searches for a mask that will show her the way home in this fantasy written by famed DC Comics storyteller Neil Gaiman.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
If only "The Mod Squad" were as sophisticated as it is self-referential, or as smart as it is funny.The movie, like the 1968-1973 TV show, was produced by youth-TV king Aaron Spelling. And, like the worst kind of TV show, it's really, really dumb.That's not to say it isn't likable. The chief reasons for its appeal are its stars: Claire Danes, Omar Epps and Giovanni Ribisi as the young would-be criminals who are recruited as an undercover police squad.They're supposed to be really tough, though we never see the lives of crime from which they've been redeemed.
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By Ian Spelling and Ian Spelling,Chicago Tribune Summer stock; Whether you're headed for the beach or camping in the woods this summer, stock up on essentials you'll need to beat the heat | July 16, 1998
Claire Danes' so-called life a teen success storyClaire Danes had a dream."I was going to be a therapist, live in California, right next door to my best friend, and share a pool," Danes says with a girlish giggle. "I'd be a therapist and do acting workshops on the side. Then I thought about that and made an announcement to my parents.'No, no, I must be true to my heart.'"Staying true to her heart meant pursuing a career as an actress. Now, at 18, the charming, wide-eyed Danes is widely considered the best actress of her generation.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 27, 1994
What's the Halloween equivalent of humbug? Even though every other TV show seems to be geared to the holiday somehow, CBS has not made room on its schedule for what, until this year, was virtually an annual tradition: a repeat of "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown." CBS programmers must be out of their gourds.* "Gubernatorial Candidates Debate" (8-9 p.m., Channel 22) -- A repeat of the debate between Democrat Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey that was aired last week, in which Maryland voters asked candidates questions.
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By Paul Cullum and Paul Cullum,Los Angeles Times | July 1, 2007
After she'd had a brief incandescent run in the theater and done some TV movies, Meryl Streep got her first film role: two brief scenes in Julia, starring Vanessa Redgrave and Jane Fonda. Her second was The Deer Hunter, in which she played a war bride and fresh-faced beauty - so green, in fact, that some thought they had merely found a woman who resembled the character and cast her. The film generated the first of her 14 Oscar nominations. Now 30 years later, Streep's oldest daughter, Mamie Gummer, after only two professional plays, has her first role of consequence in a film starring Vanessa Redgrave (Evening)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2005
LOOK FOR FULL REVIEWS IN TOMORROW'S MOVIES TODAY SECTION Chicken Little This latest animated effort from Disney, the first since the studio abandoned traditional in favor of computer animation, is the tale of a socially outcast chicken with a credibility problem - no one, not even his dad, believes him when he insists the sky is falling. G. Jarhead Sam Mendes (American Beauty) directs Jake Gyllenhaal as a Marine serving in the Mideast during the first war with Iraq. R. MirrorMask A young girl searches for a mask that will show her the way home in this fantasy written by famed DC Comics storyteller Neil Gaiman.
FEATURES
September 19, 2005
How the stage world is portrayed on screen is the theme of Towson University's "Theater and/As Film" series, running Monday nights through Dec. 5. Tonight's offering is last year's Stage Beauty, starring Billy Crudup as Edward "Ned" Kynaston, a 1660s actor known for his skill in playing women's roles. When Charles II suddenly allows women to play these roles, Kynaston's life turns upside-down. Claire Danes also stars. The film screens at 7:30 tonight at Towson University's Van Bokkelen Hall, 8000 York Road.
FEATURES
October 30, 2004
One-eyed Mike Wazowski and James P. "Sulley" Sullivan are professional scarers, with the screams they generate powering Monsteropolis. They punch the clock, scare some humans, go home. It's a living. But, when a little human girl follows the (to her) teddy-bearish Sulley back to his world, and a co-worker's envy boils over, workplace turmoil ensues. Monsters, Inc. (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) features the voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman. ABC. At a glance Brokedown Palace (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 22, 2004
Stage Beauty is about the wonder of live theater and the inevitability of change, about the tragedy of becoming obsolete and the danger of getting what you wish for, about the transcendence of art and the banality of those who think they can dictate its terms. It is also set about three centuries too early and is only about half as scandalous as its makers think it is. That's a lot to draw from a small, 110-minute movie, but how else can one react to a story that traces the origin of method acting to the 17th century, forces Claire Danes to flash her breast to prove to the world she's a woman and hinges on the whims of a foppish king who makes the right call for the wrong reasons?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter M. Nichols and Peter M. Nichols,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2003
A Terminator movie?" exclaims Claire Danes in a documentary about the making of Jonathan Mostow's film Terminator 3: The Rise of the Machines. Accustomed to quieter roles, Danes says she was changing planes in Los Angeles when to her amazement she was suddenly offered the role of Kate Brewster, a veterinarian who gets bounced around in the back of speeding vans while a 20-year-old machine called the terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) battles a building-wrecking blonde called T-X (Kristanna Loken)
FEATURES
October 30, 2004
One-eyed Mike Wazowski and James P. "Sulley" Sullivan are professional scarers, with the screams they generate powering Monsteropolis. They punch the clock, scare some humans, go home. It's a living. But, when a little human girl follows the (to her) teddy-bearish Sulley back to his world, and a co-worker's envy boils over, workplace turmoil ensues. Monsters, Inc. (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) features the voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman. ABC. At a glance Brokedown Palace (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 13, 1995
The Hollywood press corps has been calling Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen the Dream Team since the three announced their partnership in October to form a new entertainment company.Two-thirds of the team, Katzenberg and Spielberg, met with critics in Los Angeles yesterday supposedly to explain what their company would mean to the TV industry. But instead of details, all they had was recycled talk of the "dreams" that led to their partnership.How much of a non-news-event was the standing-room-only press conference?
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
If only "The Mod Squad" were as sophisticated as it is self-referential, or as smart as it is funny.The movie, like the 1968-1973 TV show, was produced by youth-TV king Aaron Spelling. And, like the worst kind of TV show, it's really, really dumb.That's not to say it isn't likable. The chief reasons for its appeal are its stars: Claire Danes, Omar Epps and Giovanni Ribisi as the young would-be criminals who are recruited as an undercover police squad.They're supposed to be really tough, though we never see the lives of crime from which they've been redeemed.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 1998
I have now seen the pilot for "Felicity" four times. The first two times were just for enjoyment. The last two were reality checks to see if it is really as good as it seemed during the first two viewings.It is."Felicity" is the story of Felicity Elizabeth Porter, 17-year-old freshman at the University of New York. The story opens in her dorm room. She's alone and talking into a recorder, taping a letter for her friend and former French tutor, Sally, who now lives in New Mexico.In voiceover and flashback, we hear the story of a boy who wrote something in Felicity's high school yearbook a few months ago on graduation day and how she bolted from the pre-med path at Stanford that her parents had made it oh-so-easy to follow and instead came 3,000 miles to be at the same school as that boy."
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