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Claim To Fame

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FEATURES
November 29, 1991
NAME: Pam ShriverCLAIM TO FAME: President of the Women's Tennis Association.WORK LIFE: Professional tennis player.HOME LIFE: Single.PASSIONS: Low-fat frozen yogurt, women's tennis, politics, public service.QUOTE: "Do as much as you can now, because you don't know how long it will last."
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NEWS
June 9, 2007
EDWIN TRAISMAN, 91 Helped create Cheez Whiz Edwin Traisman, a food researcher who helped create Cheez Whiz and, as an early McDonald's franchise owner in Wisconsin, co-developed the freezing process used to make McDonald's french fries, died Tuesday at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison after suffering a heart attack, said his wife, Dorothy Traisman. He had worked as a director of food research at Kraft Foods, where he was instrumental in the development of Cheez Whiz cheese spread, instant pudding and other food products, before buying the first McDonald's franchise in Madison, Wis., in the late 1950s.
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FEATURES
January 10, 1992
Claim to Fame: Greater Baltimore Committee chairman; Chairman and president of the Rouse Company.Home life: married to Rosetta for 35 years in August.Passion: Hiking and canoeing in the wilderness of theAdirondacks.People you admire: Jim Rouse, Walter Sondheim and Woody Allen.Quote: "The return of NFL football to our city is a matter of great importance to our community, which the business community supports in every way possible."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2005
Seventy years ago, the small town of Elkton was the marriage capital of the East Coast. Wedding chapels lined Main Street like a miniature Las Vegas strip (minus the casinos, of course). Today, the Historic Little Wedding Chapel is Elkton's sole remaining chapel. Couples can also be married by the Deputy Clerk of Courts at the Cecil County Courthouse. But the number of prospective brides and grooms choosing either of these options is a far cry from the thousands who flocked to Elkton during the town's marrying heyday.
NEWS
June 9, 2007
EDWIN TRAISMAN, 91 Helped create Cheez Whiz Edwin Traisman, a food researcher who helped create Cheez Whiz and, as an early McDonald's franchise owner in Wisconsin, co-developed the freezing process used to make McDonald's french fries, died Tuesday at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison after suffering a heart attack, said his wife, Dorothy Traisman. He had worked as a director of food research at Kraft Foods, where he was instrumental in the development of Cheez Whiz cheese spread, instant pudding and other food products, before buying the first McDonald's franchise in Madison, Wis., in the late 1950s.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | March 17, 2001
BOISE, Idaho - They catch your eye as soon as they enter the gym, not just with their basketball skills, but also because of the marching band and cheerleaders. It's a show inside The Show. Not only has No. 15-seeded Hampton University captured the hearts of fans in Boise, of all places, with their stunning, 58-57 upset of second-seeded Iowa State on Thursday night in the West Regional, the Pirates are the essence of what the NCAA tournament and college athletics should be all about. It's a tale of David vs. Goliath.
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson | May 6, 1994
Washington -- BEING away from a place can give you a different view from the one that seemed so familiar. A year's sojourn in 1992 in Kansas teaching journalism and law and lecturing to young entrepreneurs in Kansas City, Mo., then a departure last year for a new job gave me a needed change of pace.Even before I left Baltimore, the disquiet of some people in Baltimore over the style of the city's new comptroller, Jacqueline McLean, was making waves. Those waves apparently continued I strolled onto campus at the University of Kansas.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 2, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Smoldering on the Senate floor the other day after a majority of his colleagues had cleared the way for passage of the McCain-Feingold bill, Kentucky Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Darth Vader against campaign finance reform, let loose an uncommon tirade. After years of blocking the legislation with a combination of bullying, delaying tactics and injecting "poison pill" amendments intended to drive off Democratic votes, Mr. McConnell was reduced to whining. With open contempt for the 53 senators whose votes had overcome the last major hurdle in the way, he called the action a "stunningly stupid thing to do."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Here's what's great about America: You can pick up the phone, dial up a real-life presidential candidate, and the person who picks up at the other end is none other than the actual presidential candidate. No receptionist. No secretary. No campaign aide. The actual candidate. Often after only one ring, as though Mr. or Ms. Presidential Hopeful were sitting by the phone, fingers drumming on a table, waiting for someone to call. Anyone to call. This happens again and again as I work my way through the list of more than two dozen so-called "others" who, because they could cough up the $1,000 filing fee, are running in tomorrow's presidential primary in New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 30, 2003
Bahama Breeze has surprisingly good food for a restaurant chain and decent enough prices. The problem is getting a table. Open only a couple of months, Towson's new island-themed eatery is already a hit. By 7 p.m. on weeknights and 6 p.m. on the weekend, the wait begins to be long. Like other popular chains, Bahama Breeze doesn't take reservations. No problem, I said to myself. The chain is proud of its same-night, call-ahead service. I'll just call before we leave home and put our name on the list.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Here's what's great about America: You can pick up the phone, dial up a real-life presidential candidate, and the person who picks up at the other end is none other than the actual presidential candidate. No receptionist. No secretary. No campaign aide. The actual candidate. Often after only one ring, as though Mr. or Ms. Presidential Hopeful were sitting by the phone, fingers drumming on a table, waiting for someone to call. Anyone to call. This happens again and again as I work my way through the list of more than two dozen so-called "others" who, because they could cough up the $1,000 filing fee, are running in tomorrow's presidential primary in New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 30, 2003
Bahama Breeze has surprisingly good food for a restaurant chain and decent enough prices. The problem is getting a table. Open only a couple of months, Towson's new island-themed eatery is already a hit. By 7 p.m. on weeknights and 6 p.m. on the weekend, the wait begins to be long. Like other popular chains, Bahama Breeze doesn't take reservations. No problem, I said to myself. The chain is proud of its same-night, call-ahead service. I'll just call before we leave home and put our name on the list.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2003
The luckiest day in Federico Fellini's life may have been the day the circus sent him packing. Fellini, the subject of a month-long film series beginning tonight at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown, was only 7 at the time, and the middle-class life his parents had made for themselves in the small Italian village of Rimini wasn't doing it for him. Like many kids, he dreamed of something more exciting, more splendid, more colorful. So he ran away from his boarding school and linked up with a traveling circus for a life of clowns and jugglers and animals and people who in their day would have been called freaks.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG and JOHN EISENBERG,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
NEW BRITIAN, Conn. -- People kept expecting Steve Dalkowski to die. When he was a heat-throwing, hell-raising pitcher in the Orioles' minor-league system in the late 1950s and early 1960s, he made a bet with Earl Weaver, one of the many managers who tried to harness his awesome potential. "You won't live to see 33," said Weaver, believing Dalkowski's nightime habits eventually would do him in. When Dalkowski turned 33 in the early 1970s, he called Weaver and said, "Ha, I made it." In 1994, his head clouded with dementia after years of alcoholic wanderings in California, he came back to live in this factory town where he had been a schoolboy star.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2001
EDGAR SPRINGS, Mo. - This is it: the center. Imagine the United States as a huge, flat map. Then picture all 281 million Americans standing on the points representing their homes. Now lift that map - don't spill the people - and balance it on the tip of a pen. Edgar Springs is the balancing point. The Census Bureau has it figured: The center of the U.S. population is this friendly little town in backwoods Missouri, a community where you can buy a house for $30,000 and vote for your favorite crayon drawing in the kids' art contest at the Hot Lips Cafe.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 2, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Smoldering on the Senate floor the other day after a majority of his colleagues had cleared the way for passage of the McCain-Feingold bill, Kentucky Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Darth Vader against campaign finance reform, let loose an uncommon tirade. After years of blocking the legislation with a combination of bullying, delaying tactics and injecting "poison pill" amendments intended to drive off Democratic votes, Mr. McConnell was reduced to whining. With open contempt for the 53 senators whose votes had overcome the last major hurdle in the way, he called the action a "stunningly stupid thing to do."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG and JOHN EISENBERG,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
NEW BRITIAN, Conn. -- People kept expecting Steve Dalkowski to die. When he was a heat-throwing, hell-raising pitcher in the Orioles' minor-league system in the late 1950s and early 1960s, he made a bet with Earl Weaver, one of the many managers who tried to harness his awesome potential. "You won't live to see 33," said Weaver, believing Dalkowski's nightime habits eventually would do him in. When Dalkowski turned 33 in the early 1970s, he called Weaver and said, "Ha, I made it." In 1994, his head clouded with dementia after years of alcoholic wanderings in California, he came back to live in this factory town where he had been a schoolboy star.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2003
The luckiest day in Federico Fellini's life may have been the day the circus sent him packing. Fellini, the subject of a month-long film series beginning tonight at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown, was only 7 at the time, and the middle-class life his parents had made for themselves in the small Italian village of Rimini wasn't doing it for him. Like many kids, he dreamed of something more exciting, more splendid, more colorful. So he ran away from his boarding school and linked up with a traveling circus for a life of clowns and jugglers and animals and people who in their day would have been called freaks.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | March 17, 2001
BOISE, Idaho - They catch your eye as soon as they enter the gym, not just with their basketball skills, but also because of the marching band and cheerleaders. It's a show inside The Show. Not only has No. 15-seeded Hampton University captured the hearts of fans in Boise, of all places, with their stunning, 58-57 upset of second-seeded Iowa State on Thursday night in the West Regional, the Pirates are the essence of what the NCAA tournament and college athletics should be all about. It's a tale of David vs. Goliath.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
A local art scholar looks at the walls full of Alsatian soldiers, Tyrolean landscapes, French cardinals and female models draped in diaphanous gowns. He likes what he sees. Very much.The scholar is not in a museum -- not the kind most people think of anyway -- but Haussner's Restaurant, where waitresses walk past the picture-heavy walls with trays heaped with turkey croquettes, crab imperial, pig's knuckles and Wiener schnitzel a la Holstein.For the many years that Baltimoreans have been sopping the gravy from their plates here while wondering about the scene of ancient Rome near the cream pitcher, there has been little public assessment of the artwork's history and place in scholarship.
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