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By ANN EGERTON | September 14, 1993
Well, at long last, some children are being asked, no, told, to do the right thing, and I don't mean to eat oatmeal. The headmaster of Gilman School, Arch Montgomery, is making civility a major theme of the academic year. Mr. Montgomery, who is beginning his second year as head, sounds as if he's mad as hell and not going to take it any more. He sounds as if he thinks that civility is a civil right, which is an inside-out way of thinking these days. Our culture has become so saturated with political correctness and the view that personal expression, no matter how obnoxious, should take precedence over anything as boring as polite behavior, that what Mr. Montgomery is doing is brave if not positively dangerous.
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NEWS
September 15, 2014
Speech is designed to convey a message which carries with it an intended tone, purpose and meaning by the speaker. The recent incident in which a Confederate flag was raised at a high school football game in Howard County has quickly turned into a First Amendment argument, followed quickly by volleys of opposing opinions and arguments about the symbolism of this particular flag ( "Glenelg High student disciplined for displaying Confederate flag at...
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NEWS
May 17, 2011
What a great idea: a Cuss Bucket! ("Time for a little gosh-darned civility," May 17). We used to do a similar thing at home when our children were growing up, only the words they might have used were a lot milder than those inferred in Fred Rasmussen 's delightful article. Wouldn't it be wonderful (sigh) if we could get back to gentle language again? And gentle behaviors? And respect for one another? We could all benefit from some "gosh-darned civility.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Fed up with rodents and flooding, about half of the members of Baltimore's law department are leaving their ground-level offices at City Hall for a renovated facility in downtown Baltimore. The $306,000 cost of the renovations was approved Wednesday by the city's Board of Estimates. About 50 law department employees will move from City Hall to two floors on city-owned property at 7 E. Redwood St. "It became an environmental challenge," said City Solicitor George Nilson of the ground-level offices.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
In reference to Susan Reimer 's commentary ("Our special relationship with 'Downton Abbey,'" Jan. 10), my wife and I were also discussing the reasons why we've been so taken with "Downton Abbey. " In our case, it has nothing to do with any preoccupation with royalty. The fact that all the people in the house, from highest to lowest, treat each other with basic respect and dignity is very appealing, not to mention that it gives us some momentary respite from the cultural cesspool in which we find ourselves at the moment.
EXPLORE
September 15, 2011
"Choose Civility" has been a theme of Columbia and Howard County for a few years now, and until recently it seemed a very apropos statement for the area. Howard County was an oasis in a desert. I work in Montgomery County, and driving there is like driving through a mine field. Washington, D.C., is even worse, maddeningly Big Brother-like. I take a deep breath and relax when I get back home to Howard County, this oasis of civility. When I heard about the speed camera program, I was so disappointed.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
The silver lining in this cloud of controversy regarding Johns Hopkins University and Dr. Benjamin Carson may be that Dr. Carson's eloquence concerning the debacle of political correctness will get our undivided attention ("Dr. Ben Carson steps down as speaker at Hopkins graduation," April 11). "Someday in the future, it is my hope and prayer that the emphasis on political correctness will decrease and we will start emphasizing rational discussion of differences so we can actually resolve problems and chart a course that is inclusive of everyone," he wrote.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 18, 2012
When one writes about moral convictions, it's probably a good idea to consistently live up to them. That way people can still disagree with your convictions, but they have a difficult time accusing you of hypocrisy. Last week at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, I failed to live up to one of my highest principles. Here's the background. The story about the Obama administration's attempt to force Catholic and other faith-based institutions to offer employees free contraception in their health care coverage was still fresh.
NEWS
By Valerie J. Gross | October 6, 2013
How many times per day do you check email and texts? How quickly do you expect a response? What about Facebook and Twitter? In an informal survey conducted by the Howard County Library System (HCLS) this summer, answers ranged from "500 times per day" to "never. " It's likely no surprise that Millennials (18 to 30) checked the most frequently, while Baby Boomers and members of the Greatest Generation (those of us who are 50 years old and "better" - and who still send an occasional birthday card via snail mail)
EXPLORE
April 12, 2012
I am so saddened about to read that the Piccadilly Circus is coming to Howard County ("Piccadilly Circus coming to county fairgrounds," April 5). Not only that, this article provided them with free advertising. Circus animals suffer inordinately in these venues. Please do not support any circuses that use animals. Instead enjoy the wonderful Big Apple Circus or others like it. This will teach compassion and civility to our children and others. Choosing Civility would only lead to the choice of not attending/supporting circuses such as Piccadilly, Ringling, etc. Barbara Glick Columbia
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Rev. Dr. L. Carroll Yingling Jr., a retired United Methodist Church minister and former superintendent of the Baltimore Northwest District, died of cancer Aug. 23 at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 87. "He had a lot of strengths, and he loved the people wherever he served and they returned that love," said the Rev. Lon B. Chesnutt, a longtime friend who retired in 1999 from Hiss Memorial United Methodist Church in Parkville, where he had been pastor for many years.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 31, 2014
Fifty years ago this summer, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, marking a watershed moment in our nation's history and in the ongoing struggle of African-Americans for fair and equal treatment. The passage of the law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin, and ended voter discrimination and segregation of schools, came amidst a tumultuous period that saw sit-ins, marches and mass protests staged from major cities to college campuses of every size.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Carrie Evans, the executive director of Equality Maryland, was arrested at an immigration reform rally in Washington on Thursday afternoon, the state's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender organization said. The arrest wasn't surprising , as Evans had announced earlier this week that she planned to participate in a collective act of civil disobedience in front of the White House with marchers from Casa de Maryland and other social justice organizations. The event Thursday, which began in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters in Washington, was dubbed the #FightforFamilies march.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
R. Alonzo "Lonz" Childress, a civil engineer whose career with the Baltimore County Department of Public Works spanned more than 40 years, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from an infection. The Taneytown resident was 72. "Lonz was one of the most pragmatic and even-keeled persons that you'd ever meet. He was good at getting to the bottom of problems," said Brian L. Childress, a nephew who is a civil engineer with D.S. Thaler & Associates. "He always maintained a steady course and never got worked up. He could solve engineering problems without ever getting out of sync," said Mr. Childress, who lives in Perry Hall.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
President Obama's decision last weekend to launch U.S. surveillance flights over Syria in preparation for possible airstrikes against the Islamist militants who have overrun large swaths of the country since June has brought the U.S. another step closer to direct involvement in the years-long civil war there. But it still hasn't resolved the most vexing question facing U.S. policymakers: How does one reverse the military gains of the radical Islamic State, which is now menacing Iraq as well, without at the same time strengthening Syrian President Bashar Assad's hold on power?
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Tucked inside the files at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston are State Department notes from the 1960s detailing racial discrimination along U.S. 40 in Maryland - and warning the president of its implications for the Cold War. One account describes the experience of an African diplomat who couldn't find a restaurant to serve a glass of water for his son as the boy struggled to catch his breath during an asthma attack. Another tells of a diplomat who drove 10 bleary-eyed hours along the highway - then the main thoroughfare between New York and Washington - because motels in Maryland wouldn't rent him a room for the night.
EXPLORE
March 2, 2013
Thank you for publishing Maria Santo's piece on abortion community suffers from the effects of abortion every day.  Women are hurt by their past abortions, men suffer because they are powerless to help their unborn children, the "little ones" (fetus in Latin) never get to be held and loved or experience the beauty of nature, the thrill of sports, the love and sacrifice of marriage.  We talk about "civility" in Howard County. As  Ms. Santo so articulately says, "Civilized societies do not kill children as a solution to any problem, no matter how grave.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
As a 35-year Columbia resident, I am fully aware of the role that the Merriweather Post Pavilion has played in our history and like most of our citizens have enjoyed many concerts there. I also know that the county landfill serves a valuable purpose, although I wouldn't want to live there. About three years ago we moved "down-wind" from Merriweather near Wilde Lake. Originally, we believed that the noise levels, pounding percussion and thunderous bass levels were an unexpected price to pay. I would joke with friends that we got a few dozen "free" concerts each year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Donald H. Seitz, a retired civil engineer who primarily spent his career with McLean Contracting Co. of Baltimore and Norfolk, Va., died Aug. 3 of heart failure at Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. He was 88. The son of Henry Seitz, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer, and Leona Altvater Seitz, a homemaker, Donald Henry Seitz was born in Baltimore and raised on Hurley Avenue in the city's Gwynns Falls neighborhood. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1943, Mr. Seitz immediately joined the Navy's V-5 flight program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Thomas D. Fantom Jr., a retired civil engineer and World War II Army Air Forces veteran, died July 23 at Arden Courts in Pikesville of complications from a fall. He was 91. The son of Thomas D. Fantom Sr., a civil engineer, and Alice E. Fantom, a homemaker, Thomas Davis Fantom Jr. was born on Palmer Avenue in the city's Pimlico neighborhood, and moved with his family to Granite during the Depression. He was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Fantom enlisted in the Army Air Forces the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941.
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