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By ANN EGERTON | September 14, 1993
Well, at long last, some children are being asked, no, told, to do the right thing, and I don't mean to eat oatmeal. The headmaster of Gilman School, Arch Montgomery, is making civility a major theme of the academic year. Mr. Montgomery, who is beginning his second year as head, sounds as if he's mad as hell and not going to take it any more. He sounds as if he thinks that civility is a civil right, which is an inside-out way of thinking these days. Our culture has become so saturated with political correctness and the view that personal expression, no matter how obnoxious, should take precedence over anything as boring as polite behavior, that what Mr. Montgomery is doing is brave if not positively dangerous.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Howard Homer Walters, a retired civil engineer and former president of Bell Atlantic Properties, died of kidney failure April 1 at the BayWoods of Annapolis. The longtime Cape St. Claire resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore on Belmont Avenue, he was the son of Howard Walters, a Western Union telegrapher, and Marie Hefner Walters, a homemaker. He was a 1948 graduate of the Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Maryland in 1952.
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NEWS
May 17, 2011
What a great idea: a Cuss Bucket! ("Time for a little gosh-darned civility," May 17). We used to do a similar thing at home when our children were growing up, only the words they might have used were a lot milder than those inferred in Fred Rasmussen 's delightful article. Wouldn't it be wonderful (sigh) if we could get back to gentle language again? And gentle behaviors? And respect for one another? We could all benefit from some "gosh-darned civility.
NEWS
By Caroline Brennan | April 6, 2014
We have reached a solemn milestone in Syria: It has been three years since the beginning of the war that has uprooted the lives of millions of people. From a distance, this conflict can seem overwhelming or even hopeless. Up close, it feels personal - with hope just about the only thing people have to hold onto. What is striking are the masses of women and children who make up nearly 75 percent of the estimated 2.5 million Syrian refugees. While we don't see them as much because many women in the region are not comfortable being photographed, they shoulder some of the greatest burdens of this crisis as they struggle to find help and to care for their children, who are too-often severely traumatized.
EXPLORE
September 15, 2011
"Choose Civility" has been a theme of Columbia and Howard County for a few years now, and until recently it seemed a very apropos statement for the area. Howard County was an oasis in a desert. I work in Montgomery County, and driving there is like driving through a mine field. Washington, D.C., is even worse, maddeningly Big Brother-like. I take a deep breath and relax when I get back home to Howard County, this oasis of civility. When I heard about the speed camera program, I was so disappointed.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
In reference to Susan Reimer 's commentary ("Our special relationship with 'Downton Abbey,'" Jan. 10), my wife and I were also discussing the reasons why we've been so taken with "Downton Abbey. " In our case, it has nothing to do with any preoccupation with royalty. The fact that all the people in the house, from highest to lowest, treat each other with basic respect and dignity is very appealing, not to mention that it gives us some momentary respite from the cultural cesspool in which we find ourselves at the moment.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 18, 2012
When one writes about moral convictions, it's probably a good idea to consistently live up to them. That way people can still disagree with your convictions, but they have a difficult time accusing you of hypocrisy. Last week at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, I failed to live up to one of my highest principles. Here's the background. The story about the Obama administration's attempt to force Catholic and other faith-based institutions to offer employees free contraception in their health care coverage was still fresh.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
The silver lining in this cloud of controversy regarding Johns Hopkins University and Dr. Benjamin Carson may be that Dr. Carson's eloquence concerning the debacle of political correctness will get our undivided attention ("Dr. Ben Carson steps down as speaker at Hopkins graduation," April 11). "Someday in the future, it is my hope and prayer that the emphasis on political correctness will decrease and we will start emphasizing rational discussion of differences so we can actually resolve problems and chart a course that is inclusive of everyone," he wrote.
NEWS
By Valerie J. Gross | October 6, 2013
How many times per day do you check email and texts? How quickly do you expect a response? What about Facebook and Twitter? In an informal survey conducted by the Howard County Library System (HCLS) this summer, answers ranged from "500 times per day" to "never. " It's likely no surprise that Millennials (18 to 30) checked the most frequently, while Baby Boomers and members of the Greatest Generation (those of us who are 50 years old and "better" - and who still send an occasional birthday card via snail mail)
EXPLORE
April 12, 2012
I am so saddened about to read that the Piccadilly Circus is coming to Howard County ("Piccadilly Circus coming to county fairgrounds," April 5). Not only that, this article provided them with free advertising. Circus animals suffer inordinately in these venues. Please do not support any circuses that use animals. Instead enjoy the wonderful Big Apple Circus or others like it. This will teach compassion and civility to our children and others. Choosing Civility would only lead to the choice of not attending/supporting circuses such as Piccadilly, Ringling, etc. Barbara Glick Columbia
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly moved Saturday to dramatically change Maryland's drug laws as the House of Delegates joined the Senate in voting to make possession of small amounts of marijuana a civil offense punishable only by a fine. The House voted 78-55 to approve a measure substantially similar to the decriminalization bill overwhelmingly passed by the Senate last month. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said his chamber would agree to the House's relatively minor changes and send the bill to Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
The calls to remove Charles Stanley's name from the Laurel public library are narrow-minded and reflect the shallow, simplistic understanding the vast majority of Americans have about the Civil War. If asked to identify the cause of the Civil War, most Americans would reflexively respond, "slavery. " This is simply not true. Like all major events in history, the Civil War was complex and defies any simple explanation. Attributing the Civil War solely to slavery is intellectually lazy.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
On March 5, 1770, a group of British soldiers fired into an unruly crowd, killing five American civilians in an incident known as the Boston Massacre. Facing murder charges and potentially the death penalty, the soldiers had difficulty finding someone to defend them in court. John Adams agreed to represent them not because he sympathized with their circumstances but because he believed that they had a right to a legal defense. He succeeded, too, as six of the soldiers were acquitted and two convicted only of manslaughter.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
As a Laurel resident, I read with great interest the Feb. 20 article in the Laurel Leader and the letter to the editor from Lindsey Baker Feb. 27, regarding the Laurel Library branch retaining the Charles Stanley name after a new building is completed. In addition to his public service, Mr. Stanley was an American Confederate Civil War veteran, having served as a private in Company B of the First Regiment, Maryland Cavalry from 1862 to 1865 (Archives of Maryland 2002). In their letter, the Laurel Historical Society references how important "it is to understand the history of our community, in order to create a better future.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Even after paying their debt to society, millions of Americans who have been imprisoned for committing a crime remain unable to exercise the most fundamental right of citizens in a democracy. State laws that bar felons from voting after their release - in some cases for the rest of their lives - undermine their efforts to rehabilitate themselves as productive members of society and disproportionately affect minorities, who make up more than a third of the nearly 6 million people affected by such laws.
NEWS
By David Horsey | February 11, 2014
The severe drought in California and much of the West is a reminder that civilized life is a paper-thin veneer that overlays the deep upheavals of nature. Humans carry on blithely, holding fast to the illusion that the natural world can be tamed and exploited with no unavoidable consequences, and then we get slammed by a hurricane, a flood, a tornado, a wildfire, a drought or a freezing polar vortex that lets us know how wrong we are. Yet, after each disaster, we forget again -- which is the reason so few of us give any sustained attention to the climate change peril.
EXPLORE
March 2, 2013
Thank you for publishing Maria Santo's piece on abortion community suffers from the effects of abortion every day.  Women are hurt by their past abortions, men suffer because they are powerless to help their unborn children, the "little ones" (fetus in Latin) never get to be held and loved or experience the beauty of nature, the thrill of sports, the love and sacrifice of marriage.  We talk about "civility" in Howard County. As  Ms. Santo so articulately says, "Civilized societies do not kill children as a solution to any problem, no matter how grave.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
As a 35-year Columbia resident, I am fully aware of the role that the Merriweather Post Pavilion has played in our history and like most of our citizens have enjoyed many concerts there. I also know that the county landfill serves a valuable purpose, although I wouldn't want to live there. About three years ago we moved "down-wind" from Merriweather near Wilde Lake. Originally, we believed that the noise levels, pounding percussion and thunderous bass levels were an unexpected price to pay. I would joke with friends that we got a few dozen "free" concerts each year.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union released an online "toolkit" on Wednesday outlining ways local advocates can improve conditions for LGBT prisoners across the country. It also provides information on how LGBT prisoners can protect themselves. In its announcement, the ACLU said lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender inmates in the United States face increased levels of sexual harassment, sexual assault and physical isolation. Transgender people often cannot live in spaces for those of their identified gender, and are forced to strip so guards can check their genitals.
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