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By GREGORY KANE | March 10, 1999
Anditu Siwatu has barely a gray hair in the braids that cascade majestically down below her shoulders. She's 61 now, 30 years older than when she joined the Black Panther Party, partially to protest police misconduct. "I've always spoken out about people being mistreated," she said, sitting in her Northwest Baltimore home. Today Siwatu is president of the local chapter of the National People's Democratic Uhuru Movement. The 8-year-old organization is based in Chicago and led by Akua Njeri, the widow of slain Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, who was killed as he lay in a stupor (an FBI informant had drugged him)
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she has asked her senior team to explore giving Baltimore's police civilian review board a "more impactful" role in the police disciplinary process. "In order for us to be consistent across the board when we're talking about civic engagement, we have to make sure the ways in which we touch the public are impactful," she said. "I don't have answers on what, if any changes there will be. That's definitely something I am looking at. " The Police Department recently asked the civilian review board to review major "use of force" cases such as officer-involved shootings.
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NEWS
By Robert E. Rutan For and Robert E. Rutan For,The Howard County Sun | September 22, 1991
As a member of the Howard County Citizens Advisory Council for Public Safety, I must reply to Michael James' article, "Panel rejects proposed civilian review board for police" (The Howard County Sun, Sept. 15).The article is replete with misinformation, quotes taken out of context and innuendo regarding the competence and integrity of thecouncil. It fails to give your reader an in-depth analysis of the extensive amount of research that is the basis for the council's findings.At the 25 meetings held by this council, the council was presented with much information and expertise, both pro and con, concerning the operation, methods of appointment, success and failure of civilianreview boards throughout the United States.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
One year after city officials pledged to reinvigorate Baltimore's police civilian review board, members say their work feels insignificant and they are still seeking more authority. The Police Department recently said it would ask the volunteer citizen panel to look at police-involved shootings and other major use-of-force cases. The reviews, however, would occur after the cases have been closed — a role that seems perfunctory, members say. "We want to know: What are we really going to do?"
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | November 30, 1992
In the wake of the Rodney King morality play in Los Angele comes an idea that proponents say will effectively restore community confidence in law enforcement. Opponents say it will politicize the issue and, possibly, damage a police department's internal discipline.To an extent, both sides may be right.On a national level, a civilian-controlled review process for police misconduct complaints is a growing trend -- one that has not gone unnoticed in Baltimore, where a majority of City Council members have sponsored a resolution seeking a new Citizens Review Board.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
Protesters called for the creation of a civilian review panel yesterday to investigate new evidence that unexpectedly cleared a white Baltimore police officer last week in the 1993 fatal shooting of a black teen-ager."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 21, 1999
LAST SUNDAY'S column reported about charges by retired Baltimore City police Officer Walter Holtz that gamblers and numbers runners made routine payoffs to cops during his years on the force. Holtz further claimed that he was bounced from the force for reporting the corruption.The column mistakenly identified Walter Holtz as Ken Holtz. But three men who served with Holtz read the column and said that while they didn't call him Ken, they didn't call him Walter either."He was a stick man," charged retired Officer Gene Brukiewa, who was twice named Baltimore City Policeman of the Year.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 11, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- Police officers in this city are, willingly or unwillingly, part and parcel of the process of civilian review. A five-member board of civilians known as the police commission runs the department, handing out discipline and picking the chief.An Office of Citizen Complaints investigates allegations of police misconduct and prosecutes officers before a hearing of the commissioners if the allegation is sustained. Officers must make statements to the OCC as part of the investigation, but their statements can't be used against them later in criminal or civil proceedings.
NEWS
February 4, 1997
A CIVILIAN OVERSIGHT board for the Annapolis Police Department may diffuse the current hostility of the city's African American community toward the police, but that would be the wrong reason to create one.If city officials want citizens to intervene in police department affairs and discipline, they must have very sound rationale.Annapolis has not always had a professionally run department with properly trained, competent officers. At times in the past, a civilian review board was needed to curb blatant abuses of civil rights.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
The Baltimore City Council introduced a resolution last night supporting a civilian police review board.Baltimore Democratic State Sen. Ralph M. Hughes introduced legislation last month that would create an 18-member panel to examine the conduct of police officers. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who has opposed previous efforts to create the board, is supporting the legislation that would give the board subpoena power to call witnesses, gather documents and discipline officers.Southwest Baltimore Councilman Norman A. Handy Sr. introduced the resolution last night.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore's police civilian review board has concerns that a new effort to garner input from the board is not meaningful, an official told a City Council committee on Wednesday night.  After years of neglect, the department has been making strides to make the board more relevant, and recently announced that it would refer major use of force investigations, such as police-involved shootings and in-custody deaths, to the board after they were completed....
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The Baltimore Police Department says it will begin to post a log of its investigations into serious use of force by officers online, and for the first time will ask the city's civilian review board to look at shootings involving its officers and deaths of people in custody. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said the move was the latest in a series intended to improve transparency and accountability. "We have a responsibility to be as forthright and transparent as the law allows us to be, especially when it comes to our use of force," Batts told reporters Tuesday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Five city residents have been nominated to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, filling out a volunteer panel that has been described as irrelevant and ineffective. For years, the civilian review board has had four vacancies out of nine positions, indicative of the erosion of interest in the once-controversial board by city officials and police. Baltimore's board sometimes gets misconduct complaints from police after the cases have already been closed, and the panel's recommendations - which are not made public - are very rarely followed.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A Northwest Baltimore woman was nominated to the city's police civilian review board on Monday night, the first move in filling as much as eight positions on the beleaguered nine-member board.  The nomination of Sunny Luisa Cooper for the unpaid position represents the second time Cooper's name has been submitted to the board, which investigates citizen complaints of abusive language and excessive force by police. She was originally put forward along with two others by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in 2011, and confirmed by the council, but the swearing-in never took place.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
Once a month in a conference room on the ninth floor of the Equitable Building on North Calvert Street, a small group of regular citizens from around Baltimore huddles over piles of complaints filed against Baltimore police officers. The public is invited, though the public rarely attends. No one did at the meeting Thursday evening. Discussions are intentionally vague; the agenda is cryptic, with only an occasional hint of what a case is about, who was involved and where it occurred. Board members appointed by the mayor and approved by the City Council review internal affairs reports, but those documents don't get distributed beyond the board's inner circle.
NEWS
March 30, 2006
Senate Republicans' vote proposals fail Senate lawmakers engaged in a grueling partisan debate yesterday over voting procedures for the fall elections. Republicans unsuccessfully sought to adopt measures they said would safeguard against fraud, while Democrats accused the GOP of trying to suppress voter turnout. The Senate adopted legislation to provide more polling places on college campuses, sending it to the governor's desk. But the most heated discussion was over a flurry of amendments offered by Republicans that opened a broader debate over the state's voting policies.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 7, 1999
LEONARD HAMM, City College Class of 1967, now sits in an office in the basement of a building that once housed students at his alma mater's archrival: Polytechnic Institute.In 1966 and 1967, Hamm played for a City basketball squad that won 40 straight games and is ranked as one of this town's best ever. Sitting in a chair in that office, he's older, heavier, grayer now. But he's the chief of police for Baltimore's public schools. It's a job he took after spending 22 years on the city's police force.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
About 30 people turned out at a meeting last night to renew calls for a civilian review board in Baltimore to investigate allegations of police misconduct -- an idea proposed most recently last year after an officer fatally shot a knife-wielding man near Lexington Market."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
Trying to ease fears about police tactics, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley publicly introduced yesterday an oversight committee staffed with residents who will scrutinize officers' behavior. The Civilian Review Board has subpoena power and a private investigator. Though its decisions are not binding, O'Malley said his choice for police commissioner, Edward T. Norris, will take recommendations seriously. The 11-member board was established by the General Assembly last year, before O'Malley was elected.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
State legislators who helped create Baltimore's police Civilian Review Board said yesterday that they intend to amend the legislation to shorten the term of the board's first members from three years to six months. The change would counter City Council's approval Monday of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's seven nominations to the review board, created this year to monitor police misconduct.The state legislators who helped get the measure passed in Annapolis complained that Schmoke failed to open the appointment process to all residents and that three of his nominees were recommended by the police.
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