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By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
The unemployment rate in Carroll County dropped sharply from 6 percent in April to 5.3 percent in May, according to figures released Friday by the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development."
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
Carroll County's unemployment rate remained stable at 3.9 percent from August to September, a period that state economic development officials said usually shows an increase in joblessness.Statewide, the unemployment rate rose slightly, from 5.1 percent in August to 5.2 percent in September, said Marco Merrick, spokesman for the state Department of Economic and Employment Development."Even though the unemployment rate went up, it's not a drastic increase," he said Friday. "This is the norm, and it's a good norm because it's not as significant as it could be."
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
Carroll County's unemployment figures dropped from 4.6 percent in July to 3.9 percent in August, which was the second largest decrease in the Baltimore metropolitan region, state officials said Friday.Harford County had the biggest dip, dropping from 6.5 percent in July to 5.4 percent in August. The rest of the seven-county region remained relatively stable, either dropping one-tenth of a percent, remaining the same or rising one tenth.Statewide, the figure dropped from 5.2 percent in July to 5.1 percent in August, the lowest level of unemployment since September 1990, said Marco Merrick, spokesman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
Carroll County's unemployment figures dropped from 4.6 percent in July to 3.9 percent in August, which was the second largest decrease in the Baltimore metropolitan region, state officials said Friday.Harford County had the biggest dip, dropping from 6.5 percent in July to 5.4 percent in August. The rest of the seven-county region remained relatively stable, either dropping one-tenth of a percent, remaining the same or rising one tenth.Statewide, the figure dropped from 5.2 percent in July to 5.1 percent in August, the lowest level of unemployment since September 1990, said Marco Merrick, spokesman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Numbers released by the state Friday show only one more person was unemployed in the county in February than in January.Carroll's jobless rate held steady in February at 8.5 percent, but still was higher than state and national levels, the Department of Economic and Employment Development reported.On the positive side, the county was the only jurisdiction in themetropolitan Baltimore area where unemployment did not increase, DEED said.Carroll's jobless rate, however, is the highest since January 1984, when unemployment was 8.9 percent, said Theodora Stephen, manager of the DEED office in Westminster.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | September 8, 1991
The county's unemployment rate essentially remained stable in July, state figures released Friday show.The state Department of Economic and Employment Development reported that Carroll's jobless rate was 5.1 percent in July, compared to 5.2 percent in June.In July 1990, county unemployment was 4.0 percent.The national rate for August remained unchanged at 6.8 percent, the Labor Department reported Friday. (U.S. numbers are one month ahead of state numbers.)Only four fewer people were employed in July in the county than were in June, DEED said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
Unemployment rose in Carroll County in June, reversing the steady decline of the previous four months.The rise could be temporary, caused by workers at the schools and Western Maryland College who are looking for summer work, said Patrick Arnold, director of labor market analysis in the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development (DEED). They will have jobs to go back to in September, he noted."In Carroll County, I think there's a stronger than usual influence of [seasonal school employment]
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
Carroll's unemployment rate rose to 5.7 percent in August from 5.4 percent in July, leaving 203 more people out of work in the county.A total of 3,762 people received unemployment benefits in Carroll during August, compared with 3,559 in July, the Department of Economic and Employment Development reported.But officials say they're unsure why the numbers went up.The increase came just after both the county and state unemployment rates had dropped to their lowest points since November 1991.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
Carroll County's unemployment rate remained stable at 3.9 percent from August to September, a period that state economic development officials said usually shows an increase in joblessness.Statewide, the unemployment rate rose slightly, from 5.1 percent in August to 5.2 percent in September, said Marco Merrick, spokesman for the state Department of Economic and Employment Development."Even though the unemployment rate went up, it's not a drastic increase," he said Friday. "This is the norm, and it's a good norm because it's not as significant as it could be."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Carroll County's unemployment rate rose in December, in contrast to a statewide drop during the same period.The county rate rose from 5.7 percent in November to 6 percent in December. Maryland's rate dropped from 6.5 percent to 6.3 percent, the lowest monthly unemployment rate in 1992."In Carroll County, there were some layoffs in manufacturing," said Marco Merrick, a public information officer with the state Department of Economic and Employment Development.Theodora Stephen, manager of the Westminster DEED office, said Telemechanique was the only Carroll company to lay off a large number of workers.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
The unemployment rate in Carroll County made its traditional June rise, but the small size of the increase -- from 3.9 percent to 4.1 percent -- is in fact a sign of the economy's strength, state officials said Friday.Employment in the county actually went up by about 750 jobs in June, from 63,941 to 64,693. But nearly 900 people entered the civilian labor force during the month, accounting for the slight rate increase.The civilian labor force figure represents the number of people who are employed plus the number who are actively looking for work.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
More than 1,000 people left Carroll County's labor force in April and employment grew by 50 jobs, contributing to an unemployment rate drop of 1.6 percent, state officials said Friday.The decrease, which follows an unemployment drop from February to March, was the largest decline in the seven counties of the Baltimore metropolitan area, which includes Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Harford, Howard and Queen Anne's counties, and Baltimore City.Marco Merrick, spokesman for the state Department of Economic and Employment Development, said Friday that Carroll County's rate dropped from 5.8 percent in March to 4.2 percent in April.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
The unemployment rate in Carroll County dropped sharply from 6 percent in April to 5.3 percent in May, according to figures released Friday by the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 6, 1993
Fewer people were actively looking for work between March and April, as Carroll County's unemployment rate dropped from 7 percent to 6 percent in April, Maryland Department of $l Economic and Employment Development officials said Friday.Many workers who were temporarily laid off during the survey period might not have filed for unemployment insurance, further lowering the rate, officials said. The number of people filing for unemployment insurance fell from 4,787 in March to 4,019 in April.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Carroll County's unemployment rate rose in December, in contrast to a statewide drop during the same period.The county rate rose from 5.7 percent in November to 6 percent in December. Maryland's rate dropped from 6.5 percent to 6.3 percent, the lowest monthly unemployment rate in 1992."In Carroll County, there were some layoffs in manufacturing," said Marco Merrick, a public information officer with the state Department of Economic and Employment Development.Theodora Stephen, manager of the Westminster DEED office, said Telemechanique was the only Carroll company to lay off a large number of workers.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
Carroll's unemployment rate rose to 5.7 percent in August from 5.4 percent in July, leaving 203 more people out of work in the county.A total of 3,762 people received unemployment benefits in Carroll during August, compared with 3,559 in July, the Department of Economic and Employment Development reported.But officials say they're unsure why the numbers went up.The increase came just after both the county and state unemployment rates had dropped to their lowest points since November 1991.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
The unemployment rate in Carroll County made its traditional June rise, but the small size of the increase -- from 3.9 percent to 4.1 percent -- is in fact a sign of the economy's strength, state officials said Friday.Employment in the county actually went up by about 750 jobs in June, from 63,941 to 64,693. But nearly 900 people entered the civilian labor force during the month, accounting for the slight rate increase.The civilian labor force figure represents the number of people who are employed plus the number who are actively looking for work.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 6, 1993
Fewer people were actively looking for work between March and April, as Carroll County's unemployment rate dropped from 7 percent to 6 percent in April, Maryland Department of $l Economic and Employment Development officials said Friday.Many workers who were temporarily laid off during the survey period might not have filed for unemployment insurance, further lowering the rate, officials said. The number of people filing for unemployment insurance fell from 4,787 in March to 4,019 in April.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
Unemployment rose in Carroll County in June, reversing the steady decline of the previous four months.The rise could be temporary, caused by workers at the schools and Western Maryland College who are looking for summer work, said Patrick Arnold, director of labor market analysis in the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development (DEED). They will have jobs to go back to in September, he noted."In Carroll County, I think there's a stronger than usual influence of [seasonal school employment]
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Numbers released by the state Friday show only one more person was unemployed in the county in February than in January.Carroll's jobless rate held steady in February at 8.5 percent, but still was higher than state and national levels, the Department of Economic and Employment Development reported.On the positive side, the county was the only jurisdiction in themetropolitan Baltimore area where unemployment did not increase, DEED said.Carroll's jobless rate, however, is the highest since January 1984, when unemployment was 8.9 percent, said Theodora Stephen, manager of the DEED office in Westminster.
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