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NEWS
September 14, 2011
It took a lot of courage for Dan Rodricks to write his recent column regarding the civilian deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan on the 10 t h anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks ("In anger and pain, little sympathy for the 'deaths of others.'") His views are shared by many returning veterans from those campaigns who saw first hand the horrible state of so many innocent people. As a veteran of World War II and father of veterans and relative of others who have served in Iraq, I will forever support our troops but have been opposed to the Middle East military policy going back before Desert Storm.
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NEWS
August 12, 2014
I notice that, in this most recent conflict between Israel and Hamas, there are widespread calls for Israel to "limit civilian casualties. " President Barack Obama, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, and many other leaders of the free world repeat this over and over, without knowing exactly what they are asking for. They call for limits on civilian casualties? Israel has done more than any other nation in the history of the world to do so. They fire warning shots, give citizens ample time to evacuate and call cell phones in advance!
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NEWS
August 12, 2014
I notice that, in this most recent conflict between Israel and Hamas, there are widespread calls for Israel to "limit civilian casualties. " President Barack Obama, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, and many other leaders of the free world repeat this over and over, without knowing exactly what they are asking for. They call for limits on civilian casualties? Israel has done more than any other nation in the history of the world to do so. They fire warning shots, give citizens ample time to evacuate and call cell phones in advance!
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Israel has not only the right but the obligation to protect its citizens from Hamas-launched rocket attacks that now have targeted Tel Aviv and Jerusalem ( "A dangerous turning point in Israel," July 7). If Hamas wants to call an end to the now developing war and avoid further casualties, all it needs to do is to stop the rocket attacks and declare that no further ones will ensue - in contrast to the 400 fired in three days. When Hamas, now part of the unity government of the Palestinian Authority, decided to shower all of Israel with long range rockets, it changed the conflict from confrontation to war. To prevent the constant rocket attacks and the hourly interference with normal life, Israel had no option but to respond, and forcibly.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 11, 2011
One of the first questions Americans asked each other after Sept. 11 was, "Why do they hate us so much?" For many, it was just a rhetorical question in the wrenching aftermath of our nightmare. Others took a real, if fleeting, interest in understanding the beliefs and attitudes that fueled the attacks. But I think most of us resented that question and had no interest in the answer, convinced there could be no rational explanation for the indiscriminate killing of any civilian population, particularly ours.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | December 14, 2003
What the United States called a campaign of shock and awe against Saddam Hussein's Iraq is being criticized by Human Rights Watch as an invasion that used two "misguided" military tactics, resulting in hundreds of civilian deaths. The report by HRW, a human rights group based in New York, criticized the United States and Britain for using cluster weapons in populated areas and for 50 bombing strikes that were intended to kill Iraq's leadership but instead killed civilians. Cluster bombs killed or injured more than 1,000 civilians, according to HRW estimates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Somber, impatient and angry, President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan accused the U.S. military and its NATO allies yesterday of carrying out "careless operations" that led to civilian casualties, asserting that "Afghan life is not cheap and should not be treated as such." His remarks, made on the front lawn of the presidential palace, came in response to a week in which more than 100 civilian deaths have been reported from airstrikes and artillery fire against the Taliban.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | July 28, 2008
WASHINGTON - Daily airstrikes by U.S. and allied fighter-bombers in Afghanistan have almost doubled since last summer, according to U.S. Air Force data, a trend that reflects increased insurgent attacks but also raises concerns about civilian casualties. The growing reliance on airstrikes by U.S. commanders in Afghanistan appears to mark a turn in the course of the war. Responding to requests from ground commanders, allied aircraft over the past week have pummeled enemy ground targets an average of 68 times a day across Afghanistan, dropping 500- and 2,000-pound guided bombs and strafing enemy forces with cannon fire, according to Air Force daily strike reports.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 5, 2006
Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health dropped a metaphoric "cluster bomb" last month in an article in the British medical journal Lancet. The research team interviewed 1,849 Iraqi households picked at random in 47 "clusters." It concluded that total civilian deaths in the war - between 400,000 and 800,000 - were four times as great as they had been in a comparable prewar period. More than half of all those deaths in the country in the first three years of the war were a result of war-related violence, not natural causes, the team said.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 22, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - When I first saw her sitting by the swimming pool at the Al-Hamra Hotel in June, I thought, "What is this blonde sprite doing in Baghdad?" Our paths crossed only briefly. Not until this week did I learn of the incredible things that Marla Ruzicka accomplished - before she was killed by a car bomb last weekend at age 28. The daughter of California Republicans, she devoted the last few years to helping innocent civilian victims of war in Afghanistan and Iraq. She was a one-woman human rights dynamo whose death has produced an amazing outpouring of tributes from journalists and officials who knew her. She was able to focus attention on a subject many would rather ignore.
NEWS
By Faheem Younus | December 4, 2013
American drones have been operating since 2004 in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan, my motherland. But on Nov. 21, a drone fired missiles at a religious seminary in Hangu, a settled area in mainland Pakistan, killing five men in addition to a top leader of the pro-Taliban Haqqani network. Pakistanis are angry. Imran Khan, the chairman of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party, which has publicly declared the U.S. aid to Pakistan a "curse," is calling for the U.S. drones to be shot down.
NEWS
September 14, 2011
It took a lot of courage for Dan Rodricks to write his recent column regarding the civilian deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan on the 10 t h anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks ("In anger and pain, little sympathy for the 'deaths of others.'") His views are shared by many returning veterans from those campaigns who saw first hand the horrible state of so many innocent people. As a veteran of World War II and father of veterans and relative of others who have served in Iraq, I will forever support our troops but have been opposed to the Middle East military policy going back before Desert Storm.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 11, 2011
One of the first questions Americans asked each other after Sept. 11 was, "Why do they hate us so much?" For many, it was just a rhetorical question in the wrenching aftermath of our nightmare. Others took a real, if fleeting, interest in understanding the beliefs and attitudes that fueled the attacks. But I think most of us resented that question and had no interest in the answer, convinced there could be no rational explanation for the indiscriminate killing of any civilian population, particularly ours.
NEWS
By Mary Meehan | August 4, 2011
I used to think of Vice President Joseph Biden as a nice guy. Good old Joe. Down-to-earth, nice sense of humor, great family man. But last year I read the Bob Woodward book on "Obama's Wars. " His account of Mr. Biden's meeting with Afghanistan president Hamid Karzai in January 2009, was a shocker. Mr. Biden was rude and arrogant, humiliating the Afghan leader before his own cabinet ministers. He also complained about Mr. Karzai's public protest over civilian casualties from American bombing in his country.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
Regarding the photo caption accompanying your article "Israel, Gaza militants trade more fire" (April 10): You have a very odd definition of "trading. " When I think of trading, I think of trading commercial goods or baseball cards. The idea is of people voluntarily exchanging things of equal value. Israel has not been "trading" anything with the Palestinian terrorists over the last few weeks. In a short period of time, Palestinian terrorists have slaughtered a young family of five in cold blood, detonated a bomb on a bus in Jerusalem -- killing one and injuring at least 100 -- and fired a rocket at a well-marked school bus that severely injured a child.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | November 11, 2008
Tensions between Western forces and the Afghan government flared anew yesterday when President Hamid Karzai and a provincial governor accused the U.S.-led coalition of killing 14 Afghans guarding a road construction project. Karzai has demanded repeatedly that Western troops take urgent measures to avoid killing and injuring Afghan civilians. Recent high-profile instances of civilian casualties have inflamed public sentiment not only against foreign forces in Afghanistan but against the U.S.-backed government.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Aware that Saddam Hussein is placing key military equipment in civilian areas, Pentagon planners are mounting a far-reaching effort to lessen noncombatant casualties with high-tech targeting equipment, unmanned surveillance aircraft and smaller bombs. "There will be inevitable civilian casualties up front," said a senior Pentagon official, especially in the first few days of the expected fast-paced war with Iraq when several thousand precision bombs and missiles from American combat aircraft and warships are likely to rain down on targets in Baghdad and other urban areas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 2008
KABUL, Afghanistan - A U.S. military investigation concluded yesterday that only five to seven civilians and 30 to 35 Taliban were killed in an airstrike operation in western Afghanistan last month, far fewer than the 90 civilians that the Afghan government and the United Nations found in their preliminary investigations. Two civilians were also wounded, the U.S. command said in a statement. The military investigation was a standard internal one and comes ahead of a joint investigation it has agreed to conduct with the United Nations and the Afghan government to try to reconcile the vastly differing accounts of what happened early Aug. 22 in the village of Azizabad and how many people died.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 17, 2008
KABUL, Afghanistan - A NATO airstrike yesterday on a village near the embattled provincial capital of Lashkar Gah killed 25 to 30 civilians, Afghan officials in the area said. While NATO confirmed that an airstrike had taken place in the area, where Taliban fighters have been battling NATO forces, it said the reports were being investigated and the command was "unable to confirm any civilian casualties." Reliable information on the airstrike - whether it caused the deaths, as local officials and residents reported, and whether the number of civilian deaths was accurate - was elusive.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 8, 2008
AZIZABAD, Afghanistan: To the villagers here, there is no doubt what happened in an American airstrike on Aug. 22: More than 90 civilians, the majority of them women and children, were killed. The Afghan government, human rights and intelligence officials, independent witnesses and a U.N. investigation back up their account, pointing to dozens of freshly dug graves, lists of the dead, and cell-phone videos and other images showing bodies of women and children laid out in the village mosque.
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