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NEWS
October 11, 1990
Maryland Congressman Tom McMillen, in casual conversationwith Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, mentioned the other day that the federal budget imbroglio might wind up before the Supreme Court. That does not mean the high tribunal would settle matters, because the court hates to be caught in the middle of power struggles between the executive and legislative branches. But if the government should shut down again, and for any length of time, the issue could be joined.It is, moreover, an issue with distinctly Maryland origins.
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NEWS
February 15, 2011
To be meaningful, justice should be swift and sure. The article "Death penalty moratorium leaves survivors, convicts in limbo" (Feb 12) reveals that capital punishment is neither. Rather, the death penalty prolongs the pain of victims' families by dragging them through an agonizing and lengthy process that offers false promises. Life without parole costs less money and offers a swift and final sentence, which brings closure to family members of victims. The headway Maryland has made to limit the instances in which the death penalty can be applied is a step in the right direction, but eliminating the death penalty is the only sure-fire way to ensure that no innocent person is executed.
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NEWS
July 18, 1991
Virginia I. Civiletti, 73, who had been active in businesses in several cities in New York, died Tuesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of cancer.A mass of Christian burial was being offered today at St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church, 6428 York Road.Mrs. Civiletti and her husband, Benjamin C. Civiletti, moved to Rodgers Forge in 1978, after her retirement.She had been a real estate broker in Lake Mahopac, N.Y., since the late 1960s. Earlier, she was an executive secretary and administrative assistant at Croton Watch Co. in Croton, N.Y.During World War II, the former Virginia Muller, a native of NeYork City, was a supervisor in a munitions factory, winning two awards for suggestions.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 24, 2010
When the commission on capital punishment in Maryland, headed by former U.S. Attorney General Ben Civiletti, issued its final report last year, it concluded that the death penalty was not a cost-effective tool in the cause of public safety — in short, it was a waste of taxpayer money. The commission looked at the costs for prosecutors and public defenders at trials and for the litigation of appeals over a 30-year period and found them "substantially higher" than those for cases in which the maximum sentence was life imprisonment.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | August 25, 1991
The Howard County Council has given preliminary approval to a resolution authorizing payment of up to $25,000 to Benjamin R. Civiletti as a legal adviser on redistricting.At a recent work session, the council voted 3-2 along party lines to hire Mr. Civiletti, a Baltimore lawyer who served as U.S. attorney general from 1979 to 1981.Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray, D-3rd, said the three Democrats wanted to hire an attorney "who is separate from what the executive is using." Mr. Gray said he expected the council to spend "far less than the $25,000" maximum established in the resolution, which authorizes paying Mr. Civiletti $150 per hour.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1993
Benjamin R. Civiletti, the longtime managing partner of Baltimore's Venable, Baetjer and Howard law firm, said yesterday that he was relinquishing that role to partner William J. McCarthy.Mr. Civiletti, a U.S. attorney general under President Jimmy Carter, will continue to be chairman of Baltimore's largest law firm, which had 285 attorneys as of last fall.Mr. Civiletti, in a statement, said the change "evolves from the marked expansion of the firm over the past five years, both in practice areas and geographic locations."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 15, 1992
Fifth District Republican Charles C. Feaga tried last week to get a local Democrat to give free legal assistance to the County Council.The three council Democrats would have none of it. They instead voted to pay former U.S. Attorney General Benjamin R. Civiletti $150 an hour to defend a suit brought against the county and the election board.The suit, filed by Republicans David P. Maier of Elkridge and Louis M. Pope of Laurel, asks the Circuit Court to declare that the mostrecent council redistricting is constitutionally defective and invalid.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
Got a commission, task force, board or panel? Call Benjamin R. Civiletti. The life of the 58-year-old Baltimore lawyer has been full of such extracurricular activities since he served as U.S. attorney general under President Jimmy Carter.One might think it would get tiresome or tedious. Yet Mr. Civiletti agreed in January to chair another commission, tackling Maryland's welfare system. The 20-member board will meet twice a month through September, producing a report this fall.Gov. William Donald Schaefer made clear, in his State of the State address, that the commission may consider any options to deal with the state's record high welfare rolls, which climbed to more than 220,000 at the height of Maryland's recession and remained there.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2006
On a recent windy morning, Benjamin R. Civiletti, chairman of the law firm Venable LLP, sat in a stuffed chair in his 18th-floor Baltimore office and talked for nearly two hours about litigation, the law and his life. Time, as they say, is money, and in this case, it's a lot of money. If Civiletti had been with a client, the conversation would have cost a hefty $2,000. That's almost $17 for every minute; a buck or so for each thoughtful pause. Civiletti, a former U.S. attorney general, has been a big-shot attorney in Maryland for decades.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | August 25, 1991
The Howard County Council has given preliminary approval to a resolution authorizing payment of up to $25,000 to Benjamin R. Civiletti as a legal adviser on redistricting.At a recent work session, ? the council voted 3-2 along party lines to hire Mr. Civiletti, a Baltimore lawyer who served as U.S. attorney general from 1979 to 1981.Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray, D-3rd, said the three Democrats wanted to hire an attorney "who is separate from what the executive is using." Mr. Gray said he expected the council to spend "far less than the $25,000" maximum established in the resolution, which authorizes paying Mr. Civiletti $150 per hour.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter and Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com and gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 30, 2009
After Gov. Martin O'Malley called for a "fair up or down vote" on the death penalty during his State of the State address yesterday, top lawmakers began discussing strategies for how that could happen this year. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said it was "strongly possible" that the entire Senate would debate the O'Malley-backed initiative and predicted a close vote in favor of repealing Maryland's death penalty. Miller vowed to block filibuster efforts. Miller, a staunch supporter of capital punishment, said he believes the death penalty "is not working in the state of Maryland, because of judges, because of lawyers, because of cost."
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
Benjamin R. Civiletti, a prominent Baltimore lawyer and former U.S. attorney general who once called for a national moratorium on capital punishment, will head a state commission studying the death penalty in Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. The commission begins its deliberations as O'Malley, a staunch death-penalty opponent, has moved toward ending Maryland's de facto moratorium on executions by ordering the drafting of procedures for the use of lethal injection. O'Malley, a Democrat, made that decision on the advice of legal counsel after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Kentucky's use of lethal injection protocols that are virtually identical to Maryland's.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2006
On a recent windy morning, Benjamin R. Civiletti, chairman of the law firm Venable LLP, sat in a stuffed chair in his 18th-floor Baltimore office and talked for nearly two hours about litigation, the law and his life. Time, as they say, is money, and in this case, it's a lot of money. If Civiletti had been with a client, the conversation would have cost a hefty $2,000. That's almost $17 for every minute; a buck or so for each thoughtful pause. Civiletti, a former U.S. attorney general, has been a big-shot attorney in Maryland for decades.
NEWS
April 16, 1999
THE FIRST reaction to Kenneth W. Starr's testimony, recommending the office of independent counsel cease to exist, is that if even he is not for it, the institution cannot survive.Mr. Starr, however, strains credibility when he suggests that every criticism heaped on him was caused by the failings of the 1978 independent counsel law and a voracious press. He takes no responsibility for the relentless quest for anything negative about President Clinton, for invading the private lives of people far removed from anything he was authorized to investigate, for pressure tactics that have defendants in peripheral cases claiming that he was trying to extort perjury harmful to the real targets.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
Robert P. Kowal, president and chief executive officer of Greater Baltimore Medical Center, announced yesterday that he will retire this year after 15 years as head of the Towson hospital.Kowal is credited with helping make GBMC a leader in a trend among suburban hospitals to develop the type of complex and ambitious programs that had been largely reserved for academic medical centers. Among the programs started or greatly expanded under his tenure were the cancer center, neurosurgery, genetic research and laparoscopic surgery.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
It wasn't clear in 1981 whether it was such a good idea for Baltimore's Venable, Baetjer and Howard to open a law office in Washington -- even if it was to be led by the head of former President Carter's justice department.Being the new kid on the block with a Republican in the White House, former Attorney General Benjamin R. Civiletti started with four other lawyers and had trouble reaching double digits for a few years.Seventeen years later, it's clear that Civiletti's gamble paid off. Venable's growth in Washington and its suburbs has helped the firm grow to its largest size in its 98-year history.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
Benjamin R. Civiletti, a prominent Baltimore lawyer and former U.S. attorney general who once called for a national moratorium on capital punishment, will head a state commission studying the death penalty in Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. The commission begins its deliberations as O'Malley, a staunch death-penalty opponent, has moved toward ending Maryland's de facto moratorium on executions by ordering the drafting of procedures for the use of lethal injection. O'Malley, a Democrat, made that decision on the advice of legal counsel after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Kentucky's use of lethal injection protocols that are virtually identical to Maryland's.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | October 7, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Lacking any congressional authority to spend money as of 12:01 a.m. yesterday, President Bush relied on anuntested legal opinion in ordering "essential" federal workers to stay on the job.White House officials said Mr. Bush's authority to keep selected officials at their jobs is based on an opinion written by former Attorney General Benjamin R. Civiletti, first issued in January 1981 during the closing days of President Jimmy Carter's administration....
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Greater Baltimore Medical Center would discontinue performing abortions, but maintain all other services if it joins with nearby St. Joseph Medical Center, the chairman of GBMC's board said yesterday."
BUSINESS
April 7, 1993
Benjamin R. Civiletti, the longtime managing partner of Baltimore's Venable, Baetjer and Howard law firm, said yesterday that he was relinquishing that role to partner William J. McCarthy.Mr. Civiletti, a U.S. attorney general under President Jimmy Carter, will continue to be chairman of Baltimore's largest law firm, which had 285 attorneys as of last fall.Mr. Civiletti, in a statement, said the change "evolves from the marked expansion of the firm over the past five years, both in practice areas and geographic locations."
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