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By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
On the 150th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg, historians are revisiting the three-day event that was a turning point in the Civil War -- and publishers have released a slew of new books. For my money, there's still no better book than "The Killer Angels" by Michael Shaara, a fictionalized treatment that closely follows actual events, including the stirring attack on Little Round Top. But if you're looking for new reads on Gettysburg and the war, here are some favorites: -- "Gettysburg: The Last Invasion," by Allen C. Guelzo.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Alexander A. Kamantauskas, a computer network engineer and Civil War buff who enjoyed giving highly detailed battlefield tours to family and friends, died May 15 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 45. "Alex knew something about everything, but he was very humble. He was a happy and friendly person who always made friends easily," said Steve Balbach, a longtime friend and a computer engineer who lives in Ashton in Montgomery County. The son of Social Security Administration workers, Alexander Antony Kamantauskas was born in Catonsville and raised in Columbia.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
If the current immigration bill proposed by both major parties passes and is signed into law in its present and projected forms, the predictable result will be a split as yet unseen in our history between all blacks and all Latinos of both genders, driving them out of both parties ("Immigration bill clears hurdle," June 12)! Feeling utterly betrayed by the Democrats - with whom they've been since 1936 to now - black voters may well choose to return to their former party of 1865-to-1936, the GOP. The Latinos will find themselves driven into a virtual war with all blacks.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was, without doubt, the most important rail system in the Civil War's Eastern theater. There's hardly a pivotal battle or event during the four-year conflict in which the B&O didn't play at least some role. Civil War historian and Linthicum resident Daniel Toomey, author of "The War Came by Train: The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad During the Civil War" and curator of war-themed exhibit at Baltimore's B&O Railroad Museum, goes a step further. "The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was truly the first front of the Civil War," Toomey writes in his book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
On this Memorial Day, I thought it would be worth recalling the Civil War origins of this annual observance. Here is one of the most beloved songs from those terrible years of when the country was torn apart by an internal conflict. "The Vacant Chair" may seem overly sentimental in our cyncial era, but the bitterwseet words and simple tune can still haunt, as they did when the Civil War was taking its toll on so many soldiers and their families. We shall meet, but we shall miss him There will be one vacant chair We shall linger to caress him While we breathe our evening prayer.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2013
Enjoy a truly unique musical role-playing experience with General Grant and President Lincoln. Will and Bernadine Boyce have spent years perfecting their impersonations of General and Mrs. Grant (along with other Civil War personalities) and Dr. Duke Thompson, director of the Maryland Conservatory of Music, has recently conceived a concert performance unlike any other he has ever done. Together these presenters will bring an entertaining program entitled "Dr. Duke and Mr. President" to Harford County on June 1. Guests will first enjoy tasting foods from the antebellum North and South and conversing with the Grants at a reception at the Havre de Grace library beginning at 6:30 p.m. The Grants will then escort guests at 7 p.m. next door to St. John's, home of the Maryland Conservatory of Music, where they will be treated to a rare glimpse of Lincoln's musical side.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | April 25, 2013
This year marks the observance of landmark anniversaries of several military milestones in U.S. history. The 150th anniversary of the third year of the Civil War, among the bloodiest in American military history, is commemorated throughout 2013. This year also is the bicentennial of the second year of the War of 1812; it was a year notable for the British Navy's Chesapeake campaign which resulted in the sacking of Havre de Grace. Notably, a century ago this year was the last full year of what passed for peace in the complicated lead up to the start of World War I. The coming year marks the centennial of the start of what was initially referred to as the Great War, but would later be called the War to End All Wars and then when another great war erupted a generation later, World War I. This year also marks the 60th anniversary of the end of a war that looms large in American policy even now, the Korean War. In an effort to ensure that the Korean War doesn't get lost in the mix, a group of veterans from Harford County who fought on the peninsula nation that borders China's northern Manchuria territories, but has been claimed at times by Japan, donated $1,000 to the county's public library system to support commemorations of the 60th anniversary.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 22, 2013
Stories from one of American history's most revered women, Clara Barton, filled the Fallston library April 11, when more than 50 people watched Mary Ann Jung portray Barton during a living history presentation that spanned Barton's brave life as a teacher, government worker, Civil War nurse and eventual founder of the American Red Cross. Through enthralling stories and interaction from the audience, Jung was able to portray Barton's independent spirit and perseverance despite meeting much opposition throughout her life.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
A Washington County man digging a hole to plant a tree in his backyard unearthed a 3-inch Civil War-era round Thursday, the Office of the State Fire Marshal said. The round, which had never been fired, was identified as a 3-inch Federal Navy Schenkl, with its fusing mechanism still intact. Fire Marshal officials said J.D. Taylor, of the 17000 block of Powell Road in Sharpsburg, found the round and turned it over to authorities. The round was safely disposed of, the fire marshal's office said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Eleven years ago, Navy Capt. Barbara "Bobbie" Scholley dived more than 230 feet into the ocean to help bring back the past: two sailors killed when their Civil War battleship sank in 1862. On Friday, the Annapolis woman joined the crew members' descendants and dignitaries to usher them into eternity. The two sailors, whose remains were recovered from the wreckage of the USS Monitor in 2002, were buried at Arlington on Friday, 151 years after the ship battled the Confederate ironclad Virginia in the critical Battle of Hampton Roads, which revolutionized naval warfare.
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