Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCivil War
IN THE NEWS

Civil War

NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Abraham Dash, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and federal attorney who taught at the University of Maryland school of law from 1970 until his death, died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in Bowie. He was 86. News of his death prompted an outpouring from former students and colleagues, who posted online dozens of tributes to his teaching, counsel and courtly spirit. "There's little if anything left unsaid about Abe. And yet anyone who knew him would want to be a part of these acts of remembrance," wrote a law school colleague, Gordon Young.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Rebecca A. Adelman | January 2, 2014
In three weeks, representatives from the Assad regime and the opposition are scheduled to convene in Geneva to begin the process of negotiating peace in Syria's civil war - five months after the government's chemical weapons attacks killed more than 1,400 people. The atrocities were depicted in a series of casualty photographs and videos that circulated globally on news and social media, and they provoked the threat of military action against the Assad government by the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
"A Civil War Christmas," the extraordinary play with music by Pulitzer Prize-winning Paula Vogel at Center Stage, has broken the theater company's record for single ticket daily gross. That makes it one of the best-selling shows in the 50 years of Center Stage. The response has prompted a small extension of the play's run. An extra performance has been added -- 7:30 p.m. Dec. 22 (the show was to have closed after the matinee that day).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
We have never really stopped fighting the Civil War. Probably never will. But, once in a while, maybe we can all agree that the things that once split the nation apart should not keep us apart now, that there are still things that ought to bind us together. The winter holidays seem a particularly apt time for such reflection, a time when we tend to take stock, gather around families and friends, count blessings, put hope in the next year. All of which is to say that the Baltimore premiere of Paula Vogel's "A Civil War Christmas" in a soaring production at Center Stage couldn't be more welcome or relevant.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The performing arts scene is revved up for another holiday season. In addition to the usual flurry of such perennial favorites as Handel's "Messiah" and Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker," this year's lineup gains fresh spice from several new-to-Baltimore productions, including a play about the last Christmas of the Civil War and stage adaptations of popular holiday movies. Here's a look at some of these novel attractions. 'A Civil War Christmas' In 1997, just before the premiere of "How I Learned to Drive," the powerful play about child abuse that would earn her a Pulitzer Prize, Paula Vogel got the inspiration for a very different work.
NEWS
October 30, 2013
Officials at the World Health Organization warned this week that a recent outbreak of polio among children in Syria potentially could threaten the entire region unless urgent steps are taken to halt its spread. The United Nations reported that the two-and-a half-year Syrian civil war has devastated the country's health-care system, disrupted vaccination programs and left millions of families living in squalid refugee camps whose unsanitary conditions make them ideal breeding grounds for diseases like polio.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | October 15, 2013
While it saddened me to read recently of the attendance troubles at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, I was not surprised. In a city where museums generally exceed expectations, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum has always left something to be desired. As a high school history teacher in Baltimore City public schools, I have never wanted to take my students there because I know intuitively they would hate it. While I understand the impulse to showcase African Americans' social and economic high achievers, this positivist approach obscures the scope of what black Americans have overcome in the past and the challenges they still face today.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Ronald S. Coddington, an author and editor, has spent nearly four decades collecting Civil War-era images — especially cartes de visite, his favorite. Out of a collection of 2,500 images he has assembled, 1,500 are cartes de visite, with the remainder being daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes. In 2004, his first collection of images resulted in "Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories" published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The format he used, in which he was able to research and write a thumbnail biography of each person, was so successful he did a second volume, "Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories," published in 2008.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.