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Civil War

FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | August 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The National Geographic Society has opened an exhibition of Civil War photography as moving and evocative as any ever staged; yet all of the more than 30 color photographs in it were taken within the last four years.The National Geographic's Sam Abell, who took the photos for the show, summed up his mission: "The Civil War cast a spell over America -- in its aftermath."He sought to get at the essence of that spell by focusing his lens on what remains of the Civil War -- the battlefields, the monuments and memorials, the graves, the misty, ghostly atmosphere that still shrouds the hills, rivers and farm fields over which this bloody American struggle was fought.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | February 14, 2002
Missouri-based children's author and illustrator Cheryl Harness has just published her 17th book, Ghosts of the Civil War, and now she's making the promotional rounds to bookstores to sign copies and lead programs. She'll be in our area Saturday at Junior Editions bookstore in The Mall in Columbia (on the upper level, just outside Sears). The book follows Lindsey, a little girl unhappy about being stuck at a dull battle re-enactment with her parents, as she takes an unlikely trip back in time more than 100 years to the days of the Civil War. There, she learns a new respect for the war in which she previously had no interest by watching "actual" debates about abolition, secession and patriotism and witnessing the battles at Bull Run and Gettysburg, Gen. Lee surrendering at the Appomattox Court House and Abraham Lincoln's assassination.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 23, 1993
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- In the dim light of a rustic tavern, Bill Clark and other Civil War re-enactors drink Guinness Stout, debate obscure history books and battlefield tactics and dream of bringing to life that era of national strife.For Mr. Clark and about 20 others, the dream has become more than talk. They have formed a nonprofit corporation and are negotiating to buy about 200 acres south of Gettysburg -- a short drive from the Maryland line -- to create a living-history museum of the Civil War.They are applying for state and federal grants, seeking donations and planning fund-raisers to garner the $8 million to $10 million cost of the project.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 22, 1992
In the fall of 1958, James McPherson came to Baltimore as a 22-year-old graduate student in American history at Johns Hopkins University. He remembers the pleasant summer nights and walks to Memorial Stadium to watch the Orioles play. There is something else he recalls -- the feeling that, all around him, the world was changing."When I arrived here, the restaurants were still segregated, and the schools had just been desegregated," he said. "And, nationally, there were sit-ins, confrontations between federal authorities and local jurisdictions.
NEWS
April 23, 1993
Interest in the Civil War has been growing steadily since the 1990 PBS documentary series on the subject. On spring and summer weekends, it is not unusual to see collectors, equipped with metal detectors, combing through city parks in search of bullets and other memorabilia that may have been left behind by Union soldiers. In Carroll Park, the site of a former military camp, up to 300 aficionados are expected to erect tents Memorial Day weekend for one of the Civil War enactments which have become popular in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1996
Betcha didn't know this -- but it's the opening days of the Civil War, and Fort McHenry is a Union fort, surrounded by a city whose sentiments are openly sympathetic to the South.And you thought this was 1996 with the Civil War far, far behind us. Well, on Saturday and Sunday, the 1861 Civil War Encampment takes over Fort McHenry. The park will be open to visitors who wish to experience that period in the life of Fort McHenry. About 7,000 people are expected to attend over the two days."There are 150 people involved," says Scott Sheads, the park historian at Fort McHenry.
FEATURES
By Tom Mooney and Tom Mooney,Providence Journal-Bulletin | April 13, 1995
One day last month in the dank basement of the 122-year-old maximum-security prison in Cranston, R.I, security officer James Bailey cast a flashlight beam over scurrying vermin and piles of decaying junk.The state fire marshal's office had recommended that the basement be cleaned. But before everything was thrown out, Mr. Bailey wanted a look around.A history buff with some archaeology experience, he knew treasures sometimes lurk in creepy places. He found some buried in a waist-deep mound of moldy, half-eaten papers.
FEATURES
By Huston Horn and Huston Horn,Special to the Los Angeles Times | September 26, 1990
"My shoes are gone; my clothes are almost gone. I'm weary, I'm sick, I'm hungry. My family have been killed or scattered. . . . And I have suffered all this for my country. I love my country. But if this war is ever over, I'll be damned if I'll ever love another country."A Confederate soldier confided this to his commanding general as they trudged toward Appomattox, we are told in Geoffrey Ward's "The Civil War: An Illustrated History," (Alfred A. Knopf; $50; 425 pp., illustrated) and his tragicomic sentiments are a surpassingly apt summation of America's schizophrenic, semi-suicidal war with itself.
FEATURES
By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,New York Times | August 13, 1991
No one expects a pop song to survive a century. As the hit parade marches on, most old songs are tossed away or simply forgotten; anything that's recognized just a few years later is prized as a golden oldie.Yet "The Songs of the Civil War," a program that will be broadcast tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 9:45 a.m. on MPT (channels 22 and 67) is a reminder of just how many songs from the 1860s most Americans know in their bones -- not just "Dixie" and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," but "The Yellow Rose of Texas," "Aura Lee" and even the bugle call "Taps," which was commissioned as an elegy for Civil War casualties.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 3, 1996
Ken Davis, he of the "Don't Know Much About History" and "Don't Know Much About Geography" best sellers, sits in a conference room of The Baltimore Sun building and makes an observation that, in these days, should be shocking, but isn't."
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