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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1995
HAGERSTOWN -- The nation's largest Civil War battlefield preservation group will relocate its headquarters from history-rich Fredericksburg, Va., to downtown Hagerstown by early next year.Hagerstown, a former railroad hub with lesser-known ties to the Civil War, edged out Winchester, Va., the other finalist for the nonprofit group's headquarters, because of a "superb" package of economic and other incentives, said Thomas W. Richards, board chairman of the Association for the Preservation of Civil War Sites Inc.The move places the 10,000-member, nonprofit association in reach of about 2.2 million people who visit Antietam, in nearby Sharpsburg, Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
"To day has bin a memorable day," Emilie Frances Davis wrote in a miniature diary on Jan. 1, 1863, the date the Emancipation Proclamation became law. "I thank God I have bin here to see it. The day was religiously observed, all the churches were open. We had quite a Jubilee in the evening. I went to Joness to a party, had a very blessest time. " Davis, a 21-year-old seamstress and freeborn black woman living in Philadelphia, was jotting down her feelings about the event that came to be known as Jubilee Day in one of three pocket diaries she kept from 1863 to 1865 during the height of the Civil War. The diaries, which somehow avoided destruction, are being published now for the first time.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 6, 2005
A 175-mile-long corridor that runs through Western Maryland -- and includes the nation's greatest concentration of Civil War battlefields -- has been named one of the most "endangered" places in America. The National Trust for Historic Preservation included the "Journey Through Hallowed Ground" corridor in its just-released 2005 list of the 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. The trust compiles a list each year to call attention to historic buildings and places that need to be saved from pending threats, such as demolition and suburban sprawl.
NEWS
By Allan Gurganus and Allan Gurganus,Allan Gurganus is author of "Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All." He writes from Chapel Hill, N.C | October 10, 1990
WE ARE DRAWN to the Civil War because it is the 20th century as coming attraction. For all its horror, the struggle took no longer to complete than a bachelor's degree. The diploma was awarded, the fever was survived. Foreign wars are compared to blows from without; civil wars are fevers. Fevers have their own narrative integrity: A crisis arrives, the patient endures it or succumbs.Despite a seemingly fatal temperature, our strapping young republic lived. Its industrial strength redoubled, it made the quantum lunge at prosperity and unity.
NEWS
April 11, 1991
Space is still available for the all-day conference on "Maryland andthe Civil War," from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. April 20 at the Joint Hearing Room of the Legislative Service Building in Annapolis.The conference, sponsored by the Maryland State Archives, will assess the state of knowledge about Maryland and the Civil War and will feature such experts on the subject as Ross Kimmel, William L. Brown, James Walker and Brian Pohanka. Pohanka was a consultant to the film "Glory."Registration for the conference is $25 -- $20 for students -- which includes a box lunch and attendance at a reception following the program in the honor of Phebe R. Jacobsen, a senior archivist who recently retired.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
Carroll Community College will hold the ninth annual "Maryland and the Civil War: A Regional Perspective" conference from 9:15 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 25 at the 1601 Washington Road campus. Doors will open at 8:30 a.m. for the event that features speakers, displays and music commemorating the Civil War. The conference is sponsored by the college, the Historical Society of Carroll County and the Catoctin Center for Regional Studies. Keynote speaker Glenn Williams will open the day with a presentation on "Despot's Heel," about Maryland's state anthem and the circumstance that inspired the song.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1991
The climactic battle for the Shenandoah Valley, General Pickett's headlong charge at Gettysburg and the first and second battles of Manassas are the stuff Richard Berg has fashioned a business from.Mr. Berg, 47, a former New York City criminal defense lawyer, is the inventor of more than a dozen Civil War games designed to give Civil War buffs an opportunity to change history."I think of the games as paper time machines that re-create the Civil War," Mr. Berg said."We give players the battlefield, the soldiers and the basic rules.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill HC | September 20, 1990
Some facts and oddities about the Civil War* Two percent of the country's population, 620,000 people, died in the war, two out of three from disease, not injuries. That is nearly equal to the total number of Americans lost in all other wars the country has fought.* In two days at Shiloh, there were more casualties than in all previous American wars combined.* The number of Union soldiers killed, missing or wounded at Antietam -- 12,401 -- was double the casualties of D-Day. With a total of 23,000 casualties, Antietam was the war's bloodiest day.* The first national paper currency was issued during the Civil War.* A Confederate private named Henry Stanley was captured at Shiloh, survived the war and eventually went to Africa where he found Dr. Livingston.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | August 12, 1991
Eleven months after PBS first aired Ken Burns' 11-hour documentary series "The Civil War," the nation is still caught up in that chapter of U.S. history, supporting a Civil War cottage industry of sorts.The award-winning series, currently in repeats on many PBS stations (it concludes Wednesday at 9 p.m. on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67), has spawned a best-selling gift book (by Geoffrey Ward with Ric and Ken Burns; Alfred Knopf; $50), an audio book, a soundtrack and a video set. Civil War books, long out of print, have been reissued by publishers.
NEWS
March 19, 1991
HAGERSTOWN -- Conservationists launched a fund-raising campaign yesterday to buy 23 acres of Civil War history in Maryland near Harpers Ferry National Historical Park.During the Civil War, Union soldiers manned a battery of heavy artillery at the Spur Battery to protect against Confederate attacks from the north. The property was given its name because it is on a descending spur of a mountain across the Potomac River from Harpers Ferry, W.Va."The Spur Battery is one of the most significant fortification sites at Harpers Ferry," said James I. Robertson Jr., a Civil War historian and author at Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, Va. "Its booming cannons helped thwart Confederate advances against Maryland Heights in 1864."
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