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NEWS
March 29, 2014
The calls to remove Charles Stanley's name from the Laurel public library are narrow-minded and reflect the shallow, simplistic understanding the vast majority of Americans have about the Civil War. If asked to identify the cause of the Civil War, most Americans would reflexively respond, "slavery. " This is simply not true. Like all major events in history, the Civil War was complex and defies any simple explanation. Attributing the Civil War solely to slavery is intellectually lazy.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 13, 2013
Editor:  I am writing in regards to the recent article published in The Aegis about the Civil War and my complete distaste for it. While I enjoy reading stories and articles about history, your article seemed to revere the Confederate soldiers. It is a complete a slap in the face to ANY American whose ancestors were slaves!  As I read it I wondered if you would have written the article for a Nazi soldier in the same fashion.  When anyone tries to whitewash the Holocaust they are immediately shunned, as they should be!
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 10, 2011
"It is not safe ... to trust $800 million worth of Negroes in the hands of a power which says that we do not own the property. ... So we must get out ... " — The Daily Constitutionalist, Augusta, Ga., Dec. 1, 1860 "[Northerners] have denounced as sinful the institution of slavery. ... We, therefore, the people of South Carolina ... have solemnly declared that the Union heretofore existing between this State and other States of North America dissolved. " — from "Declaration of the Causes of Secession" "As long as slavery is looked upon by the North with abhorrence ... there can be no satisfactory political union between the two sections.
NEWS
October 18, 2001
Oct. 27-28 Maryland: "The Battlefield Embalmer: Preserving the Civil War Dead," a discussion at National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Historian James W. Lowry will discuss mortuary science during the war. For more information, call the museum at 301-695-1864. Nov. 2-Nov. 3 Pennsylvania: The Seminary Ridge Symposium will present "Battle: the Nature and Consequences of Civil War Combat," at Seminary Ridge, Gettysburg. Sponsored by the Seminary Ridge Historic Preservation Foundation.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 8, 1997
Best bet There's no contest for what you should be watching tonight, as MPT begins re-running a nine-part series that constituted some of TV's finest hours."
NEWS
September 30, 1990
Many school children have had to memorize Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, but few adults know much about the events that inspired it, or the wellspring of emotion it provoked.That's because few -- other than historians -- have really examined the causes of the Civil War or thought deeply about its power in the making of the American character."The Civil War," an 11-hour PBS documentary aired last week, probably changed that. The producer, Ken Burns, calls it an American "Illiad." It's a good analogy, for sons and daughters of Hellene have long used that ancient epic to explain the essence of their hopes and dreams to others.
NEWS
February 15, 1995
In creating its new historical program, "Roads to Gettysburg," Carroll County's tourism office is employing a variation on the saying, "All roads lead to Rome." With the help of volunteers, the office has created a guide and brochure for a driving tour that retraces the route of thousands of Confederate and Union troops through Carroll to Gettysburg, Pa.Route 97 may not be the Appian Way, but the guide reveals that many of the county's roads were indeed well traveled by soldiers and played a significant role in the prelude to that epic Civil War battle.
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