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By Tom LoBianco | December 30, 1999
All about Civil War reportersExplore the role reporters had in shaping the Civil War, Sunday at the Grand Army of the Republic Civil War Museum and Library in Philadelphia. The museum will also be open for tours of its extensive collection of Civil War artifacts and memorabilia. Among the featured items are a strip of the pillow President Lincoln died on and the handcuffs that belonged to John Wilkes Booth. The museum is also home to a library of more than 2,600 Civil War books available for research.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
City Hall is considering selling or leasing 15 historic Baltimore landmarks, including the iconic Shot Tower and stately War Memorial building, which officials believe are underused and could bring the city sorely needed cash. The idea has excited those who say the sites have been neglected and allowed to fall into disrepair. But some preservationists are worried about an uncertain future for buildings they hold dear. "I've never heard about them thinking about anything like this," said Richard S.B. Smith Sr., director of the Friends of Orianda House in Leakin Park, one of the properties to be evaluated.
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NEWS
By Antero Pietila | March 22, 1997
I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN fascinated by the way many Americans view the Civil War.Celebrations of rebel symbols or re-enactments of bloody battles would be totally unthinkable in my native Finland, which went through a civil war in 1917, or in Spain which experienced fratricide in the mid-1930s. Yet thousands of Americans think nothing of donning Union or Confederate uniforms every weekend in historic role-playing exercises that can only be described as bizarre.Because of the proximity of so many crucial battle fields, Maryland has a veritable army of Civil War buffs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 4, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, has delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
NEWS
December 30, 1994
Baltimore's President Street Station, south of Little Italy, looks like a decrepit warehouse that time has forgotten. Come next summer, though, this Greek Revival structure -- the oldest surviving big-city depot in the nation -- will begin a transformation into a mini-museum."
NEWS
November 6, 2000
FOR YEARS, a tiny group of history buffs and railroad enthusiasts campaigned for the preservation of President Street Station. And for good reason. The Civil War's first casualties occurred in the vicinity of that landmark terminal near Little Italy. And even before the current station was built in 1849, Frederick Douglass and others boarded northbound trains at the location in their escape from slavery. For the past three years, Friends of the President Street Station have operated a small museum in the restored building.
NEWS
September 26, 1996
THOUGH SUPPORTERS of the new Benjamin Banneker Museum in Oella were outbid at a recent auction of Banneker artifacts, hope of enriching the museum with items belonging to the extraordinary colonial-era black scientist is not lost.The table, candlesticks and documents sought by a local consortium were bought by a Washington banker, who intends to give most of them to a monument and visitors center devoted mainly to honoring black Civil War veterans. That these items better belong in Oella and at the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis than at a visitors center focusing on events long after Banneker's death is now beside the point.
NEWS
April 6, 1997
THE FISCAL crunch that threatens to close the Baltimore City Life Museums shows that there are just too many local history museums with overlapping focus. The philanthropic and business communities simply cannot support all of them. For years, some experts have been predicting mergers and consolidations.The Maryland Historical Society has scheduled a meeting Wednesday to explore whether it can help ease the City Life Museums' crisis. The society is particularly concerned that if City Life is forced to sell its collection of paintings by Rembrandt Peale, the works should remain in Maryland.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 4, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, has delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, had delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, had delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | December 28, 2007
The little red building is dwarfed by the looming hotels and restaurants filling Inner Harbor East. Once home to the little-known Baltimore Civil War Museum, the former President Street train station will soon be on the auction block. Owned by the city, the Baltimore Development Corp. will put out a request for proposals to buy or lease the building this spring, said Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for Mayor Sheila Dixon.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 2001
One hundred thirty-six years after Grant took Richmond, reconciling the bloody shards of the Civil War is not getting any easier. Ask H. Alexander Wise Jr., president of the Tredegar National Civil War Center Foundation, which is trying to heal some war wounds by presenting Confederate, African-American and Union versions of the War Between the States under one all-inclusive, all-tolerant roof. "We need a civil discussion of a very uncivil war," said Wise, a descendant of a Confederate general and a former director of historic preservation for Virginia.
NEWS
By Stephan Salisbury and Stephan Salisbury,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 14, 2001
HARRISBURG, Pa. - It was only 40 miles from here, across the Susquehanna River and down the road, that the climactic and bloody battle of Gettysburg took place 138 years ago. When Gen. Robert E. Lee brought his Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania, Harrisburg was his objective, but Gettysburg and retreat were his fate. This city of 51,000 never saw battle (although skirmishes occurred within three miles of town), but its enticing presence induced a horrific turn in the war, a point that becomes clear at the newly opened National Civil War Museum here.
NEWS
November 6, 2000
FOR YEARS, a tiny group of history buffs and railroad enthusiasts campaigned for the preservation of President Street Station. And for good reason. The Civil War's first casualties occurred in the vicinity of that landmark terminal near Little Italy. And even before the current station was built in 1849, Frederick Douglass and others boarded northbound trains at the location in their escape from slavery. For the past three years, Friends of the President Street Station have operated a small museum in the restored building.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
Mayor Martin O'Malley is expected to announce today that the Maryland Historical Society will take over operations at the city-owned Baltimore Civil War Museum in historic President Street Station - an effort to help the struggling museum. Attendance at the museum, which opened three years ago, has been hurt by construction and the lack of parking in the area, east of the Inner Harbor, officials said. It has been run by President Street Station Inc., a private nonprofit organization supported by donations and admissions.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
Hagerstown's hopes are clouded but there may still be a silver lining for Maryland if plans announced this week by the U.S. Park Service for a Civil War museum on the site of the Gettysburg battlefield come to fruition. Hagerstown launched a similar project last spring but the project has been unsuccessful so far in securing financial backing or widespread support. Now the Park Service's plan appears to doom Hagerstown's effort.But as an arena for several important Civil War battles, Maryland could still benefit from increased tourism and interest in the Civil War generated by a new federal museum at Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
FREDERICK - Gordon E. Dammann's friends finally understood why he was so busy during the past 18 months when they toured the newly renovated, reopened National Museum of Civil War Medicine yesterday. Dammann, a 55-year-old dentist from Lena, Ill., whose collection of Civil War medical artifacts is the core of the museum's vast collection, has worked for more than a decade on the museum. During recent months, he and his wife, Karen, traveled repeatedly between Illinois and Maryland to make sure the finished product met their expectations.
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