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TRAVEL
January 19, 2011
'Pushing boundaries: African-Americans in Civil War Medicine' Where: National Museum of Civil War Medicine, 48 East Patrick St., Frederick When: Through Friday. The museum is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday What: The traveling exhibit, titled "Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African-Americans in Civil War Medicine," was created by the Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health and details the history of African Americans who served in a medical capacity during the war. One of those profiled is Maj. Alexander T. Augusta, who took a stand— nearly 100 years before Rosa Parks — against discrimination by refusing to give up his seat on a streetcar in Washington.
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NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1994
FREDERICK -- The former executive director of restoration at Maryland's historic 17th-century settlement, St. Mary's City, has been chosen to head a new museum here devoted to 19th-century medicine.Burton K. Kummerow, chief of interpretation and exhibits for the Maryland Historic Trust, will be executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, which is to open in downtown Frederick in late 1995 or early 1996.Mr. Kummerow, 53, who for several years was executive director of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission -- the government-funded keeper of the state's oldest Colonial village -- was chosen from a national field of about 100 candidates, said John E. Olson, a museum board member.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries, artifacts and ... quilts. The quilting form will be discussed and displayed Sunday at the Captain Avery Museum in Shady Side, as Mavis Slawson, a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, in Frederick, gives a presentation Sept. 8 on "Civil War Soldiers and Their Quilts. " Slawson said she hoped to convey that quilts provided more than just physical comfort to soldiers in the Civil War - they were also a source of emotional and spiritual solace for men who were a long way from home and in harm's way. "Many of these quilts had special meaning to the soldiers in the field or in the hospitals," said Slawson, a Columbia resident who is not only well-versed in the history of Civil War quilts but is an accomplished quilter herself.
NEWS
March 13, 1997
IN THE ANNALS of battle strategy, it doesn't rank with Little Round Top. But Hagerstown's recent attempt to wrest a museum of Civil War medicine from nearby Frederick was the kind of incursion that can lead to bad blood between neighbors.Frederick, which already boasts a delightful downtown, was doubly proud of the fact that a dentist who is a major collector of items related to the treatment and surgery of soliders during the "War Between the States" had chosen it as a base for his artifacts.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
FREDERICK - Gordon E. Dammann's friends finally understood why he was so busy during the past 18 months when they toured the newly renovated, reopened National Museum of Civil War Medicine yesterday. Dammann, a 55-year-old dentist from Lena, Ill., whose collection of Civil War medical artifacts is the core of the museum's vast collection, has worked for more than a decade on the museum. During recent months, he and his wife, Karen, traveled repeatedly between Illinois and Maryland to make sure the finished product met their expectations.
NEWS
May 9, 2004
May 22 Confederate surgeon presentation by Jason Grabill, at National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event includes a demonstration and discussion of Civil War era surgical practices. 301-695-1864. May 22-May 23 Civil War living history day: noon-5 p.m. May 22-23, Steppingstone Museum, Havre de Grace, Md. Civil War encampment drills, firing demonstrations, period music and dance, ice cream social, historical crafters, camp tours, and food. Admission $3, children 12 and under free.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | May 7, 1995
During the Civil War, Enoch Lowe, a former Maryland governor and supporter of Southern secession, bid his family goodbye and left his home in Frederick to join the Rebel army.The governor is remembered these days as "that traitor Lowe." He left his family with no means of support, and the family lost its 2 1/2 -story brick house, one of the many personal losses in a conflict that divided not only the nation but also the 8,000 citizens who called Frederick home.Lowe's house still stands on Second Street, and his story (more on that later)
NEWS
June 4, 2000
June 17-18: 1st North Carolina Artillery living-history encampment and demonstrations at Pitzer Woods, Gettysburg National Military Park. 13th Pennsylvania Infantry Living History encampment and demonstrations at the Pennsylvania Monument. For more information, call the Gettysburg National Military Park at 717-334-1124, Ext. 422 or 431. July 1-3: Gettysburg 137th anniversary re-enactment at the Yingling Farm, Gettysburg, Pa. Saturday: collapse of Federal 11th Corps; Sunday: Valley of Death; Monday Pickett's Charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 23, 2009
The cash-strapped Maryland Historical Society, which recently had to trim its museum and library hours to only two days a week, has appointed the head of a Towson-based firm that focuses on making history accessible to the masses as its interim head. Burton Kummerow, president of Historyworks, Inc., was named to the post Tuesday. "He reeks of history, from every fiber of his being," MdHS board president Alex G. Fisher said. "He has an undergraduate degree in history, he has a master's in history.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
While the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, the first blood spilled in fighting occurred in Baltimore on April 19, 1861, when a mob of Southern sympathizers clashed with Massachusetts soldiers who'd debarked from a train on their way to Washington. Eight rioters, one bystander and three soldiers were killed, while dozens were wounded. Situated as it was on the border between North and South, Maryland is home to Civil War sites large and small, from the sweeping landscape of the Antietam Battlefield National Park in Sharpsburg, where 23,000 men were killed, wounded or went missing in the bloodiest single day in US history, to the Surratt House Museum in the outskirts of Washington, where the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and other top government officials was hatched.
TRAVEL
January 19, 2011
'Pushing boundaries: African-Americans in Civil War Medicine' Where: National Museum of Civil War Medicine, 48 East Patrick St., Frederick When: Through Friday. The museum is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday What: The traveling exhibit, titled "Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African-Americans in Civil War Medicine," was created by the Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health and details the history of African Americans who served in a medical capacity during the war. One of those profiled is Maj. Alexander T. Augusta, who took a stand— nearly 100 years before Rosa Parks — against discrimination by refusing to give up his seat on a streetcar in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 23, 2009
The cash-strapped Maryland Historical Society, which recently had to trim its museum and library hours to only two days a week, has appointed the head of a Towson-based firm that focuses on making history accessible to the masses as its interim head. Burton Kummerow, president of Historyworks, Inc., was named to the post Tuesday. "He reeks of history, from every fiber of his being," MdHS board president Alex G. Fisher said. "He has an undergraduate degree in history, he has a master's in history.
NEWS
May 9, 2004
May 22 Confederate surgeon presentation by Jason Grabill, at National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event includes a demonstration and discussion of Civil War era surgical practices. 301-695-1864. May 22-May 23 Civil War living history day: noon-5 p.m. May 22-23, Steppingstone Museum, Havre de Grace, Md. Civil War encampment drills, firing demonstrations, period music and dance, ice cream social, historical crafters, camp tours, and food. Admission $3, children 12 and under free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2003
With the roar of a cannon and under the watchful eye of Gen. George Meade (really an actor), the Maryland Civil War Trails: Gettysburg Invasion and Retreat opens today in Frederick. The kickoff of Maryland's newest Civil War driving tour comes almost 140 years to the day after Meade was made commander of the Union forces. The change in command came in the wee hours of the morning as Meade and his men camped at Frederick's Prospect Hall, on their way to what would become the epic Battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
FREDERICK - Gordon E. Dammann's friends finally understood why he was so busy during the past 18 months when they toured the newly renovated, reopened National Museum of Civil War Medicine yesterday. Dammann, a 55-year-old dentist from Lena, Ill., whose collection of Civil War medical artifacts is the core of the museum's vast collection, has worked for more than a decade on the museum. During recent months, he and his wife, Karen, traveled repeatedly between Illinois and Maryland to make sure the finished product met their expectations.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
While the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, the first blood spilled in fighting occurred in Baltimore on April 19, 1861, when a mob of Southern sympathizers clashed with Massachusetts soldiers who'd debarked from a train on their way to Washington. Eight rioters, one bystander and three soldiers were killed, while dozens were wounded. Situated as it was on the border between North and South, Maryland is home to Civil War sites large and small, from the sweeping landscape of the Antietam Battlefield National Park in Sharpsburg, where 23,000 men were killed, wounded or went missing in the bloodiest single day in US history, to the Surratt House Museum in the outskirts of Washington, where the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and other top government officials was hatched.
NEWS
June 4, 2000
June 17-18: 1st North Carolina Artillery living-history encampment and demonstrations at Pitzer Woods, Gettysburg National Military Park. 13th Pennsylvania Infantry Living History encampment and demonstrations at the Pennsylvania Monument. For more information, call the Gettysburg National Military Park at 717-334-1124, Ext. 422 or 431. July 1-3: Gettysburg 137th anniversary re-enactment at the Yingling Farm, Gettysburg, Pa. Saturday: collapse of Federal 11th Corps; Sunday: Valley of Death; Monday Pickett's Charge.
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