Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCivil War
IN THE NEWS

Civil War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
To many, Annapolis is a Colonial town, with its 1700s architecture and its links to four signers of the Declaration of Independence. But the state's capital also played an important role in the Civil War - a history that may coincide with a controversial present-day development proposal. Local historians and history buffs believe they've found evidence that thousands of Union soldiers who had been captured and then paroled by the Confederates were once housed at a site off Forest Drive.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 13, 2011
I don't completely disagree with C. Lyon's letter "Civil war wasn't all about slavery" (April 11), but I do take issue with his take on "free" blacks in America at that time. What Lyons fails to mention is that "free" blacks were nowhere near as free as their white counterparts, and that they faced constant hostility even from white Northerners, who viewed them as competition for jobs. Moreover, the hostility they faced was often violent. Even after emancipation, blacks were nowhere near to being "free" if we consider their marginalization and lack of access to the same benefits of civilization as white people; the rise of lynching by terrorist groups like the Ku Klux Klan; and the Jim Crow laws passed under the legal doctrine of "separate but equal" that further marginalized them Add to that the unfair sentencing of blacks in criminal courts and the inordinate incarceration rate of blacks in prisons.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
Whether "Baltimore - Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner" is destined to become the city's official motto, as the City Council recently endorsed, is less important than a troubling bit of information that arose during the council's debate over the matter. Polls suggest only about one in five people living in Baltimore know of the city's link to the national anthem and even fewer are aware of it outside this state. This weekend's festivities may change that - although probably modestly so given that the PBS' Great Performances series doesn't exactly have the ratings of a "reality" TV show, let alone a major sporting event.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
I disagree with Mr. Pitts that the cause of the Civil War was all about slavery. I challenge Mr. Pitts to answer the following questions: 1. If the war was about slavery, why was West Virginia admitted to the Union in 1863 (during the War) as a slave state? 2. Why didn't slavery end when the war was over? At the conclusion of the war, slavery only ended in the 11 states that had rebelled. The other slave states, such as Maryland and Delaware, did not become free until the passing of the 13th Amendment, eight months later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
On this Memorial Day, I thought it would be worth recalling the Civil War origins of this annual observance. Here is one of the most beloved songs from those terrible years of when the country was torn apart by an internal conflict. "The Vacant Chair" may seem overly sentimental in our cyncial era, but the bitterwseet words and simple tune can still haunt, as they did when the Civil War was taking its toll on so many soldiers and their families. We shall meet, but we shall miss him There will be one vacant chair We shall linger to caress him While we breathe our evening prayer.
EXPLORE
January 30, 2013
The Laurel Museum will celebrate the opening of its new exhibit, "Stationed in Laurel: Our Civil War Story," on Sunday, Feb. 3, from 1 to 4 p.m., at 817 Main St. The exhibit explores Laurel's role in the war that engulfed the nation and how the Civil War affected the town. Refreshments will be provided. For information, go to laurelhistoricalsociety.org or call 301-725-7975.
NEWS
April 14, 2011
The adjective "all" in C. Lyon's letter "Civil War wasn't all about slavery" (April 12) raises the question of degree: How much was slavery the cause of the Civil War? But while no one can claim that slavery was the only factor in the war, slavery's role as the primary cause cannot be denied. To do so distorts and corrupts history and deemphasizes the seminal influence of black slavery on American society and politics at the time, and its legacy. That Robert E. Lee had qualms about slavery; that blacks owned black slaves; that a class-based draft led to riots in Northern cities doesn't mitigate the "peculiar institution's" central role in the violent division of the nation, they merely demonstrate the complexity of race and slavery in America at the time.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Reporter Arthur Hirsch 's article on the recent article on the re-enactment at the 150 t h anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg included a familiar Civil War anecdote about a Confederate soldier who had been captured at Fort Donelson ("A defining day relived," July 2). Responding to a question from his Union captors, he famously answered, "We're fighting because y'all are down here. " As a source of empirical evidence, this tale invites profoundly misleading interpretation: There is a duty to disclose the message actually intended by a Rebel who spoke his answer fully seven months before Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
By Rebekah Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Marylanders are being asked to brave dusty attics to help preserve history. The Enoch Pratt Free Library is in search of Civil War-era documents and wants to preserve them on computers and share them on the Internet. Librarians have joined up with the Maryland Digital Cultural Heritage Program. "We're really trying to find things that are hidden in personal collections and share them with everyone online and allow both historians and the general public to have access," said Michael Scott, the library's digitization supervisor.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Three Vietnam War veterans stood on the ramparts of Fort McHenry, gazed onto the Patapsco where British warships launched hundreds of rockets and mortar shells almost 200 years ago, and imagined the scene that unfolded during the Battle of Baltimore. "I know rain was pouring down, and with all the shooting and shelling for more than 24 hours, they had no idea if they were going to survive," said Chuck Gallinger, 69, of Oshkosh, Wis., who served in Southeast Asia in 1966. Gallinger and his friends - in town for a reunion of their unit, the 709th Maintenance Battalion of the 9th Infantry - had stopped for a taste of the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Baltimore's bicentennial celebration of its defense against the British and the writing of the national anthem.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Halfway through the eight-stop Savor Gettysburg Food Tour, I was slowing down. I had already eaten chicken fajitas and pork carnitas at El Costeno, followed by gooey macaroni and cheese with big lumps of crab meat at One Lincoln. I had sampled more than a few varieties of hard cider and red wine at the retail shop of Hauser Estate Winery. Now, seated at the rustic wooden bar on the second floor of the Garryowen Irish Pub, I looked warily at the dish in front of me, laden with yet more food: a dollop of creamy mashed potatoes topped with a single sausage slice and slivers of caramelized onion; a six-bite serving of shepherd's pie; and a tiny breakfast sandwich, consisting of a quarter-sized sweet biscuit, topped with a round of ham and a quail's egg. "Fun fact," said our tour guide, Lori Korczyk, in the same cheerful tone she had employed all morning, whether she was telling us about the excellent local restaurants or the horrific Civil War battle that had made thw town famous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris and Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Amid celebrations marking the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner," leaders in Maryland have hammered home a point: If it weren't for Baltimore, American history might well have turned out very differently. "For many Americans, the War of 1812 was a minor event, but not for us," Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday. He spoke at the March of the Defenders, which commemorated the 6-mile trek of the Maryland militia to defend the city on Sept. 14, 1814. "We call the War of 1812 the Second War of Independence, and for good reason," O'Malley said.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
President Obama's decision last weekend to launch U.S. surveillance flights over Syria in preparation for possible airstrikes against the Islamist militants who have overrun large swaths of the country since June has brought the U.S. another step closer to direct involvement in the years-long civil war there. But it still hasn't resolved the most vexing question facing U.S. policymakers: How does one reverse the military gains of the radical Islamic State, which is now menacing Iraq as well, without at the same time strengthening Syrian President Bashar Assad's hold on power?
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Francis Scott Key is so closely identified with Fort McHenry that the South Baltimore landmark is considered the go-to place to learn how the 15-starred American flag that flew after the fort's bombardment 200 years ago inspired him to write the poem that became the national anthem. But those wishing to pay their final respects to the lawyer-turned-poet could also head 50 miles west to Frederick, where Key is buried in a sprawling cemetery that runs along U.S. 40 where it shares the roadway with busy Interstate 70. "Key always wanted to be buried in the shadow of the Catoctin Mountains," said Ron Pearcey, the superintendent of Mount Olivet Cemetery.
NEWS
By Sarah E. Croco and Scott Sigmund Gartner | July 1, 2014
How far can President Barack Obama involve the U.S. in Iraq without taking ownership of a war he opposed and supposedly ended? Iraq finds itself once again on the precipice of civil war, presenting Mr. Obama with a difficult choice: Is the U.S. back in or staying out? In recent weeks, he has appeared as though he is trying to walk a fine line between the two. He earlier announced he was sending 300 military advisers to Iraq (Secretary of State John Kerry has also visited Baghdad), but he cautioned that the U.S. would only take military action "if the situation on the ground requires it. " Since then, several hundred troops have been sent to Baghdad to help protect the American embassy there and help with security and logistics, according to the New York Times, bringing the number of U.S. troops deployed to Iraq to 750. The decision over what to do is especially tough for Mr. Obama, given his history on the war. Candidate Obama made political hay on his anti-Iraq position in the 2008 primaries against Hillary Clinton, who could not escape her earlier vote for the war despite her subsequent reversal.
NEWS
September 7, 2011
Revisionist history is often times inaccurate, and such is the case with J.B. Salganik's recent op-ed article ("Baltimore true identity," Sept. 6). There are multiple points in Mr. Salganik's commentary which require clarification. First and foremost, Baltimore's loyalties during the Civil War were decidedly pro-Southern. One need only look to the Baltimore Massacre of April 1861 to understand the contempt and vitriol Baltimore citizens had for Union troops marching through their city to aid in the suppression of the "rebellion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
"To day has bin a memorable day," Emilie Frances Davis wrote in a miniature diary on Jan. 1, 1863, the date the Emancipation Proclamation became law. "I thank God I have bin here to see it. The day was religiously observed, all the churches were open. We had quite a Jubilee in the evening. I went to Joness to a party, had a very blessest time. " Davis, a 21-year-old seamstress and freeborn black woman living in Philadelphia, was jotting down her feelings about the event that came to be known as Jubilee Day in one of three pocket diaries she kept from 1863 to 1865 during the height of the Civil War. The diaries, which somehow avoided destruction, are being published now for the first time.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
A proposal earlier this week to provide temporary shelter at a Baltimore City office building for child migrants from Central America who arrive in this country without a parent or guardian appears to have been shelved for the moment, after Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake raised concerns over the facility's appropriateness. Metro West is an empty office building with no infrastructure for residential use. It's not an appropriate residence for potentially hundreds of children.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.