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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
It's been more than two years since David Scott Corrigan was caught by a police officer slicing a campaign sign from its frame outside the headquarters of a pro-slots campaign committee in Severna Park. Corrigan's criminal case involving the theft of 70 signs is long over and the Maryland Live casino at Arundel Mills opened last June. But the legal dispute is very much alive. Corrigan is in an Anne Arundel County courtroom this week fending off a lawsuit from Jobs & Revenue for Anne Arundel County, a campaign committee supported by the Cordish Cos., Arundel Mills and others.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
It's been more than two years since David Scott Corrigan was caught by a police officer slicing a campaign sign from its frame outside the headquarters of a pro-slots campaign committee in Severna Park. Corrigan's criminal case involving the theft of 70 signs is long over and the Maryland Live casino at Arundel Mills opened last June. But the legal dispute is very much alive. Corrigan is in an Anne Arundel County courtroom this week fending off a lawsuit from Jobs & Revenue for Anne Arundel County, a campaign committee supported by the Cordish Cos., Arundel Mills and others.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Police said that in April 2008, off-duty officer Norman Stamp burst out of a Southeast Baltimore strip club with brass knuckles on his hand, barreling toward a brawl involving members of his motorcycle club that had spilled into the street. That's when, according to police, the 44-year-veteran got into a confrontation with a uniformed officer sent to quell the fight, pulled his service weapon and was fatally shot. An attorney for Stamp's widow said Thursday — the first day of trial in a wrongful-death civil suit brought against Officer John Torres — that there's a different story that the Police Department wanted to suppress.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
The mother of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia student murdered in 2010, filed a $30 million civil suit Thursday against the onetime boyfriend and fellow U.Va. lacrosse player convicted of killing her, George Huguely V. Sharon D. Love's suit, filed in Charlottesville Circuit Court, charges that Huguely acted negligently and with "utter disregard" for the safety of Love, who was found dead in her off-campus apartment by a roommate shortly before she and Huguely were scheduled to graduate.
NEWS
February 6, 1997
THE FIRST QUESTION many Americans asked about the second O. J. Simpson trial was: Why? The Constitution prohibits double jeopardy -- trying a person twice for the same crime. If Mr. Simpson was tried for first-degree murder and acquitted, how could he be tried again for the deaths?The catch is that the second trial involved civil charges, not criminal charges. The penalties are different -- imprisonment or even death for guilt in the criminal charge of first degree murder, but only financial penalties for the civil charges of being found liable for a death.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- O. J. Simpson's civil trial on wrongful-death charges, now in its fourth month and scheduled to go to the jury late tomorrow, has lacked the high drama and excitement of his criminal trial on murder charges.But it has not been without its moments, including Simpson's taking the stand for the first time, the judge's ruling that race could not be made a major issue in the case and the plaintiffs' suddenly producing 30 photographs that raised fresh doubts about Simpson's contention that he did not kill his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald L. Goldman.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1997
James G. Finneyfrock lost his first attempt to prove his innocence when a jury convicted him two years ago of murdering his parents. Now the judicial system is giving him a second chance -- by letting him fight for his inheritance.Maryland bars murderers from inheriting from the people they kill. But under the law, Finneyfrock's criminal conviction isn't proof enough. He could win his share of the estate through a civil trial.If there's fairness in the law, it is lost on Finneyfrock's sister, Patricia Swiger.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | March 23, 1998
DALLAS -- Last summer, when civil trial jurors in Dallas awarded the largest monetary judgment in a clergy sex abuse case in U.S. history, the man at the center of the case walked the streets free.In this week's criminal trial, suspended Roman Catholic priest Rudolph "Rudy" Kos' freedom hangs in the balance. Twelve Dallas County jurors will be asked to convict or acquit Kos, 52, of eight sex abuse charges involving four young men who told police they were molested about 1,350 times.If convicted of the most serious charges, Kos could be sentenced to life in prison and would not be eligible for parole for 30 years.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 1996
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- At last, more than two years after the chase, a full year after the criminal trial and after the book and the video and the interviews, O. J. Simpson is scheduled to testify under oath about what he was doing the night his ex-wife and her friend were slain.The former football star, sports commentator, rent-a-car spokesman, and now, most famous defendant in the nation has been subpoenaed to take the stand today in a wrongful-death civil suit brought by the families of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald L. Goldman.
NEWS
By Sun Journal | September 20, 1996
Brace yourself for more of the same: Posturing attorneys, headline-making testimony, nightly news footage of witnesses leaving a courthouse trailed by minicams and microphones.Those will be powerful, perhaps unwelcome reminders of the O. J. Simpson murder trial, which ended in October in his acquittal. As nearly everyone who reads a newspaper or watches TV surely knows, he is on trial again. But there are key differences between the criminal trial of 1995 and the civil trial that began this week.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
Ruling that a $1.3 million lawsuit filed against the Baltimore school system was too broad, Circuit Judge W. Michael Pierson granted Wednesday the district's motion to throw out nine of the 13 counts, leaving a city jury to decide whether two principals were negligent in the alleged bullying of two students. Jurors began deliberating late Wednesday evening, after attorneys for the alleged victims' families and the school system made closing arguments in the rare four-day trial that has pitted parents against principals and exposed the medical and behavioral histories of a 10-year-old special-needs child.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
A family that unsuccessfully sued Baltimore police officers who arrested a 7-year-old boy for illegally riding a dirt bike in 2007 received a fair civil trial in Howard County, the state's second-highest court has ruled. The family had hoped to collect $700,000 in damages after Gerard Mungo Jr., who is now 11, was arrested. However a Howard County jury rejected the family's civil suit, even after a judge ruled that the arrest of the boy was illegal. In their appeal, the family's lawyers contended that the case should not have been moved to Howard County, because lawyers were not allowed to argue against it and because the racial makeup of the county is different from the city's . In its ruling issued Friday, the Court of Special Appeals decided that a city judge properly moved the case out of Baltimore because of the volume of publicity fueled by protesters, the news media and what judges called prejudicial comments by the city's mayor.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
Whatever the pressures of his city law practice, Robert Lazzaro could count on finding refuge at the end of the day at his home in Jacksonville, where the back deck offered quiet, a hot tub and a woodland view. That changed five years ago after an Exxon station less than a mile away leaked about 25,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline into the groundwater, contaminating dozens of wells and casting a shadow of fear over the small community in northern Baltimore County. "It's a constant worry, it's a constant stressor," said Lazzaro.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
Whatever the pressures of his city law practice, Robert Lazzaro could count on finding refuge at the end of the day at his home in Jacksonville, where the back deck offered quiet, a hot tub and a woodland view. That changed five years ago after an Exxon station less than a mile away leaked about 25,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline into the groundwater, contaminating dozens of wells and casting a shadow of fear over the small community in northern Baltimore County. "It's a constant worry, it's a constant stressor," said Lazzaro.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Police said that in April 2008, off-duty officer Norman Stamp burst out of a Southeast Baltimore strip club with brass knuckles on his hand, barreling toward a brawl involving members of his motorcycle club that had spilled into the street. That's when, according to police, the 44-year-veteran got into a confrontation with a uniformed officer sent to quell the fight, pulled his service weapon and was fatally shot. An attorney for Stamp's widow said Thursday — the first day of trial in a wrongful-death civil suit brought against Officer John Torres — that there's a different story that the Police Department wanted to suppress.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 5, 2010
During opening statements in a civil trial Thursday, attorneys for two sisters said Baltimore police fabricated information to justify unconstitutional strip searches performed on the women in the back of a Brooklyn bar. But lawyers for the two officers being sued said the searches - which they say turned up cocaine, marijuana and painkillers - were appropriate and the result of a sergeant's witnessing drug dealing. They say the lawsuit is motivated by money. It's an expected back-and-forth between sides.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2000
WACO, Texas -- A lot is at stake in the Branch Davidians' wrongful-death lawsuit against the government, which opens tomorrow in Waco. It's not just about money, although the plaintiffs -- surviving Davidians and the relatives of those who died at Mount Carmel--are asking for $675 million. A verdict in favor of the Davidians would mean that a federal judge, and not just critics, had found the government's actions at Mount Carmel to be negligent. "This particular civil trial could have a much greater impact on government conduct in the future than a criminal case would," said Mike Caddell, lead attorney for the plaintiffs.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1997
Finding it "incredible" that a Baltimore County woman must go to court to disinherit her brother, who killed the siblings' parents, a state senator plans to introduce legislation to stop convicted murderers from inheriting money from the people they kill.F. Vernon Boozer, a Towson Republican, said the bill is prompted by the case of James G. Finneyfrock, who was convicted two years ago of murdering his parents, Susan and Wade Finneyfrock, and now seeks a $140,838 inheritance.Boozer, who learned of the case from a Sun article last month, said he finds it "incredible" that Finneyfrock's sister, Patricia Swiger, "is spending thousands of dollars to hire counsel to fight this action that's brought by a convicted murderer."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2001
After a 43-year career as a pressman, Stanley Marcinko says he made a big mistake when he chose a financial adviser to help him invest his $200,000 life savings. Marcinko says Michael P. Keating, a licensed stockbroker and financial adviser, recommended a variety of investments to him over a 12-year period: Florida rental properties, a Texas real estate partnership and a California company that recycles asphalt. But court papers show that Keating's investment strategies prompted state and federal regulators to revoke his license, assess him hefty fines and seek a court order to have him jailed.
SPORTS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
Make them pay. That is intent of an increasing number of victims' relatives who go after suspects' money - even after criminal prosecutions falter or when no charges are filed. Ravens All-Pro middle linebacker Ray Lewis this week became one of several co-defendants in an $11 million wrongful-death lawsuit stemming from the Jan 31, 2000 deaths of Richard Lollar and Jacinth Baker. Though uncommon, legal experts say, such lawsuits are cropping up more often as families increasingly use the lower burden of proof in civil cases to try to tie suspects to the deaths of their relatives.
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