Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCivil Rights Movement
IN THE NEWS

Civil Rights Movement

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 2, 2008
Time has not dimmed the activism or straightforward opinions of "Glorious Gloria" Richardson, the charismatic heroine of the 1963 civil rights protest that she led as head of the Cambridge Non-Violent Action Committee in the Eastern Shore city. Considered by some to be a second Harriet Tubman, it was Richardson who educated then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that the civil rights movement was not just about desegregation but also poverty and joblessness. Richardson, who will be 85 in May, lives in an East 14th Street apartment near New York City's Union Square.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Christopher Beem | January 20, 1997
MOST AMERICANS believe that our society is too uncivil, too impolite. Our politics become mean-spirited and cynical. People yelling at each other on television passes as entertainment. Daily interactions grow more suspicious and mistrustful. We size each other up as members of competing, even antithetical, identity groups.We desperately want to make things different, yet we don't have the slightest idea what ''civil'' and ''civility'' requires -- or means. Martin Luther King Jr.'s holiday provides an opportunity to reflect on another important use of the word ''civil'' -- the civil-rights movement.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 26, 2005
Have black folks in 2005 failed Rosa Parks? Parks died Monday in Detroit. She has been called the "mother of the civil rights movement," and it has been said for years that her refusal to give up a seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man sparked the nonviolent protests that characterized the "modern" civil rights movement. That's an arguable assertion, at best. James Farmer, who for years was the leader of the Congress of Racial Equality, was involved in nonviolent protests, freedom rides and boycotts in the 1940s, years before Parks refused to yield to Alabama's idiotic segregation laws in 1955.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2006
The Race Beat Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff Knopf / 518 pages / $30 Like aging veterans of a long-past war, the news reporters who covered the civil rights movement half a century ago spend a lot of time these days in misty-eyed reunions. At these gatherings, inevitably someone would ask anxiously, "What have you heard about Gene's book?" After all, 15 years had passed since Gene Roberts retired after a distinguished career in daily journalism and committed himself to write a history of how "the race beat" was covered.
NEWS
By Carl O. Snowden | January 19, 2004
ON JAN. 15, 1954, a young man by the name of Martin Luther King Jr. celebrated his 25th birthday. At that tender age, he, as many black youths of his era, planned to live his life in a society that had predetermined what and who he may become. At that time, he was not aware that a social movement was about to impact his life. He later referred to this movement as the "zeitgeist" - defined as the trend of thought or feeling characteristic of a particular time period. He was on the eve of becoming involved in a whirlwind of social change.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,james.drew@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Kathleen Klein Shemer, who worked as a buyer at several Baltimore department stores before she became active in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, died of complications from an illness Thursday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Pikesville resident was 91. Born in Pittsburgh, she graduated from James Madison High School in Brooklyn, N.Y. She moved to Baltimore in the 1940s and was a volunteer nursing assistant during World War II. She worked as a buyer at Hecht's, Brager-Gutman's and other department stores in the city.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 28, 2000
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Years after a Klansman's bomb exploded Sept. 15, 1963, at 16th Street Baptist Church, killing four young girls, Myrtle Whetstone would replay that Sunday morning in her mind. She arrived early for services that day and climbed the side steps to the church, stairs she and others learned later had been booby-trapped with explosives. Was there something out of the ordinary about those steps that she had missed? A clue that would have alerted her to the destruction to come?
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
To many, that is a year when it seemed that the center would not hold - on campuses throughout America, in Paris and Prague, in Chicago at the Democratic Convention, in Washington where marchers converged, in Vietnam where war raged. And, of course, in Los Angeles and Memphis, the cities where the year's turbulence was punctuated with the sound of an assassin's bullets cutting down Robert F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King. King would have turned 77 today. He died at a time when youth was paramount, but it still seems hard to believe that he was only 39 when killed.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton | January 20, 1992
It was 1969 and Taylor Branch, then a graduate student at Princeton, was determined to sample a little of the powerful movement that was sweeping the South. After academicians reluctantly agreed to let him go, Mr. Branch headed to south Georgia. With $10 a week and a little gas money, he planned to travel the backwoods, educating unregistered black voters."I went and stepped off the end of my world, my known world," the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian recalled yesterday at an East Baltimore church celebrating the birthday of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.And Mr. Branch's version of truth soon clashed with reality.
NEWS
By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2005
DETROIT -- In a seven-hour funeral filled with song and eulogies, thousands of mourners crowded into Greater Grace Temple yesterday to pay final respects to Rosa Louise Parks, the woman whose act of defiance helped spark the civil rights movement. As 4,000 attendees sat in the wooden pews, politicians and religious leaders used the pulpit to warn that the rights that Parks fought for are far from secure. The public must "vote in every election" to protect such things as affirmative action, said Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a New York Democrat.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.