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Civil Rights Movement

NEWS
By Christopher Beem | January 20, 1997
MOST AMERICANS believe that our society is too uncivil, too impolite. Our politics become mean-spirited and cynical. People yelling at each other on television passes as entertainment. Daily interactions grow more suspicious and mistrustful. We size each other up as members of competing, even antithetical, identity groups.We desperately want to make things different, yet we don't have the slightest idea what ''civil'' and ''civility'' requires -- or means. Martin Luther King Jr.'s holiday provides an opportunity to reflect on another important use of the word ''civil'' -- the civil-rights movement.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | July 19, 1993
Next month, on the 30th anniversary of Martin Luther King's march on Washington, officials will gather at the Loews Annapolis Hotel to honor those who were at the forefront of the city's civil rights movement -- five who sat at a restaurant counter where they were far from welcome, and a sixth who helped plan and lead the fight.The red-brick hotel was the site of the Terminal Restaurant, where the fight for equal treatment in public accommodations began and quickly spurred other sit-ins and picketing throughout the segregated capital.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2006
The Race Beat Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff Knopf / 518 pages / $30 Like aging veterans of a long-past war, the news reporters who covered the civil rights movement half a century ago spend a lot of time these days in misty-eyed reunions. At these gatherings, inevitably someone would ask anxiously, "What have you heard about Gene's book?" After all, 15 years had passed since Gene Roberts retired after a distinguished career in daily journalism and committed himself to write a history of how "the race beat" was covered.
NEWS
By Benjamin F. Chavis | July 13, 1994
Chicago -- FIFTY YEARS ago, the civil rights movement battled the concrete ills of legal segregation.We now face that era's legacy, a more insidious and complex form of injustice characterized by drastic disparities between the races.The socioeconomic gap has created an equally alarming chasm of attitudes and perceptions.Almost half of all African-American children live in poverty. Black unemployment is twice that of whites. The infant mortality rate in many black communities is equal to that of many Third World nations.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton | January 20, 1992
It was 1969 and Taylor Branch, then a graduate student at Princeton, was determined to sample a little of the powerful movement that was sweeping the South. After academicians reluctantly agreed to let him go, Mr. Branch headed to south Georgia. With $10 a week and a little gas money, he planned to travel the backwoods, educating unregistered black voters."I went and stepped off the end of my world, my known world," the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian recalled yesterday at an East Baltimore church celebrating the birthday of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.And Mr. Branch's version of truth soon clashed with reality.
NEWS
By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2005
DETROIT -- In a seven-hour funeral filled with song and eulogies, thousands of mourners crowded into Greater Grace Temple yesterday to pay final respects to Rosa Louise Parks, the woman whose act of defiance helped spark the civil rights movement. As 4,000 attendees sat in the wooden pews, politicians and religious leaders used the pulpit to warn that the rights that Parks fought for are far from secure. The public must "vote in every election" to protect such things as affirmative action, said Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a New York Democrat.
NEWS
April 15, 2003
Konstantinos "Dino" Yannopoulos, 83, a vocal director whose 50-year career included prestigious opera companies and schools around the world, died April 6 in Philadelphia. He was director of the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia from 1977 to 1987 and artistic director from 1987 to 1989. Mr. Yannopoulos was principal director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York from 1945 to 1977. He also was head of the opera department of the Curtis Institute, artistic director of the Vancouver International Festival and director of the Cincinnati Summer Opera.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2000
For every Martin Luther King and Medgar Evers, for every martyr to the civil rights cause, there were thousands of other heroes who took similar risks, exhibited similar bravery and should be similarly celebrated. "Freedom Song," a tale of the civil rights movement set in the fictional town of Quinlan, Miss., in 1961, drives that point home with an emotional punch I suspect few will be able to resist. From the opening scenes, when a black father is forced to beat his own son by some white locals out for a few laughs, to the counter sit-ins and marches that eventually usher Quinlan into a time when equality just might be possible, it's a film that reminds us how truly depraved society once was. It also suggests that the greatest tragedy of the civil rights movement was that it forced everyday people to put their lives on the line to exercise such basic rights as voting and using public libraries.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- On Christmas night 1951, a terrorist bomb exploded under the floorboards in Harry T. Moore's home in Mims, Fla. Within hours, the soft-spoken NAACP state coordinator was dead, cutting short his 17-year battle for racial justice.The device had been placed below Moore's bedroom, where he and his wife, Harriette, had retired after celebrating the holiday and their 25th wedding anniversary.The blast left an 18-by-24-inch hole in the ground and turned much of the wood-frame house into kindling.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
The Columbia Archives is seeking volunteers who lived through the Civil Rights Movement to help Howard County students with their Martin Luther King Jr. Day projects. “This project will connect the people who lived through the March on Washington and the Civil Rights Movement - and personally felt the impact - with some of today's teens who have been impacted in a different way,” said Barbara Kellner, director of the Archives, which is part of the Columbia Association.  On Jan. 20, Howard County will join the nation in celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a day of service.
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