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Civil Rights Movement

NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 26, 2005
Have black folks in 2005 failed Rosa Parks? Parks died Monday in Detroit. She has been called the "mother of the civil rights movement," and it has been said for years that her refusal to give up a seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man sparked the nonviolent protests that characterized the "modern" civil rights movement. That's an arguable assertion, at best. James Farmer, who for years was the leader of the Congress of Racial Equality, was involved in nonviolent protests, freedom rides and boycotts in the 1940s, years before Parks refused to yield to Alabama's idiotic segregation laws in 1955.
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NEWS
By Christopher Beem | January 20, 1997
MOST AMERICANS believe that our society is too uncivil, too impolite. Our politics become mean-spirited and cynical. People yelling at each other on television passes as entertainment. Daily interactions grow more suspicious and mistrustful. We size each other up as members of competing, even antithetical, identity groups.We desperately want to make things different, yet we don't have the slightest idea what ''civil'' and ''civility'' requires -- or means. Martin Luther King Jr.'s holiday provides an opportunity to reflect on another important use of the word ''civil'' -- the civil-rights movement.
NEWS
By David A. Super | February 14, 2011
These opportunities come once in a generation, social movements whose cause is so manifestly just, and whose potential is so transformative, that they rise above the clutter of ordinary politics. The civil rights movement led by Martin Luther King, Cesar Chavez and others inspired a generation as it overcame Klansmen, brutal sheriffs and growers' thugs. Two decades later, we watched in awe as the brave people of Eastern Europe brought down one repressive communist dictatorship after another.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2006
The Race Beat Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff Knopf / 518 pages / $30 Like aging veterans of a long-past war, the news reporters who covered the civil rights movement half a century ago spend a lot of time these days in misty-eyed reunions. At these gatherings, inevitably someone would ask anxiously, "What have you heard about Gene's book?" After all, 15 years had passed since Gene Roberts retired after a distinguished career in daily journalism and committed himself to write a history of how "the race beat" was covered.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | January 13, 2008
Prince George's County senator and civil rights activist Gwendolyn T. Britt died early yesterday, shortly after being taken to Doctor's Community Hospital in Lanham, according to a spokeswoman for Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. She was 66. She had not been feeling well and was absent from the General Assembly's session Friday, the spokeswoman said. The cause of death was not available. The five-year Democratic state senator was expected to introduce legislation this year that would legalize same-sex marriage in Maryland - and by agreeing to do so, she had become a "hero" to that community, wrote Dan Furmansky, executive director of Equality Maryland.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
To many, that is a year when it seemed that the center would not hold - on campuses throughout America, in Paris and Prague, in Chicago at the Democratic Convention, in Washington where marchers converged, in Vietnam where war raged. And, of course, in Los Angeles and Memphis, the cities where the year's turbulence was punctuated with the sound of an assassin's bullets cutting down Robert F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King. King would have turned 77 today. He died at a time when youth was paramount, but it still seems hard to believe that he was only 39 when killed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Samuel T. Daniels, a local leader in the civil rights movement who championed African-American business enterprise and led the Prince Hall Masons for nearly four decades, died yesterday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center of complications from a fall and a brain illness. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 82. Mr. Daniels had retired in 1989 after more than 20 years as executive director of the Baltimore Council for Equal Business Opportunity, a private organization that encouraged black participation in business.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 4, 2008
ATLANTA -- In the four decades since the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the nation has undergone a stunning social and political transformation that even Dr. King may not have anticipated. The average 25-year-old would have a hard time imagining what the country was like before. No Tiger Woods or Oprah Winfrey or Will Smith. No Colin Powell or Condoleezza Rice or Barack Obama. No black presidents in disaster movies or black babies in diaper commercials. That was my childhood.
NEWS
April 15, 2003
Konstantinos "Dino" Yannopoulos, 83, a vocal director whose 50-year career included prestigious opera companies and schools around the world, died April 6 in Philadelphia. He was director of the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia from 1977 to 1987 and artistic director from 1987 to 1989. Mr. Yannopoulos was principal director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York from 1945 to 1977. He also was head of the opera department of the Curtis Institute, artistic director of the Vancouver International Festival and director of the Cincinnati Summer Opera.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
The Columbia Archives is seeking volunteers who lived through the Civil Rights Movement to help Howard County students with their Martin Luther King Jr. Day projects. “This project will connect the people who lived through the March on Washington and the Civil Rights Movement - and personally felt the impact - with some of today's teens who have been impacted in a different way,” said Barbara Kellner, director of the Archives, which is part of the Columbia Association.  On Jan. 20, Howard County will join the nation in celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a day of service.
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