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By Christopher Beem | January 20, 1997
MOST AMERICANS believe that our society is too uncivil, too impolite. Our politics become mean-spirited and cynical. People yelling at each other on television passes as entertainment. Daily interactions grow more suspicious and mistrustful. We size each other up as members of competing, even antithetical, identity groups.We desperately want to make things different, yet we don't have the slightest idea what ''civil'' and ''civility'' requires -- or means. Martin Luther King Jr.'s holiday provides an opportunity to reflect on another important use of the word ''civil'' -- the civil-rights movement.
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By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 9, 1990
IT'S NOT THAT PRIDE makes you swell up," Taylor Branch said last night at Johns Hopkins University, "it makes you blind."Speaking on "The Riddle of Moses: Blacks and Jews in America," the Baltimore-based historian said it was ethnic and cultural pride that ultimately broke the bond of Jews and blacks in the waning days of the civil rights movement. This break ushered in the current American era of so many "atomized" groups whose only shared bond is that each looks after its own interests at the expense of a greater social good.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,james.drew@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Kathleen Klein Shemer, who worked as a buyer at several Baltimore department stores before she became active in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, died of complications from an illness Thursday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Pikesville resident was 91. Born in Pittsburgh, she graduated from James Madison High School in Brooklyn, N.Y. She moved to Baltimore in the 1940s and was a volunteer nursing assistant during World War II. She worked as a buyer at Hecht's, Brager-Gutman's and other department stores in the city.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | October 31, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Beneath the vast dome of the Capitol Rotunda, friends, family and politicians gathered yesterday to pay tribute to Rosa Parks, the soft-spoken seamstress whose single act of defiance 50 years ago would transform the civil rights movement and catapult her to the status of national hero. Parks is the first woman and second African-American to lie in honor in the Rotunda. She died at her home in Detroit last Monday at 92. "Some might say she is lying in repose," said the Rev. Harold Carter, pastor of Baltimore's New Shiloh Baptist Church, one of several speakers during a moving ceremony.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
Monday, Jan 6 Artful gathering The Provinces Branch Library, 2624 Annapolis Road, Severn, will host an Art Collage Party at 7 p.m. for elementary school students and families. Come for an evening of fun with art. Light snacks will be provided. 410-222-6280 Tuesday, Jan. 7 Comics fans The Anime/Manga Club for teens will meet at 3:30 p.m. at the Crofton Branch Library, 1681 Riedel Road, Crofton. Share in the love of Japanese comics and animation. 410-222-7915. Wednesday, Jan. 8 Camera club The Arundel Camera Club meets at 7:30 p.m. in Room D114 at Severna Park High School, 60 Robinson Road.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
To many, that is a year when it seemed that the center would not hold - on campuses throughout America, in Paris and Prague, in Chicago at the Democratic Convention, in Washington where marchers converged, in Vietnam where war raged. And, of course, in Los Angeles and Memphis, the cities where the year's turbulence was punctuated with the sound of an assassin's bullets cutting down Robert F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King. King would have turned 77 today. He died at a time when youth was paramount, but it still seems hard to believe that he was only 39 when killed.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 2, 2003
DETROIT - The smell knocked the men back before anything else, a blast of old rubber and rotting horsehair and Alabama-baked red clay. For days, the mold and mildew from Montgomery City Lines' bus No. 2857 filled their sinuses as the men dug cobwebs and wasp's nests from under the driver's seat and behind the dashboard. Sometimes, history is left to decay. Sometimes, it's recovered in the most unlikely place. The bus believed to be the one Rosa Parks made famous Dec. 1, 1955, has sat in the back of MSX International, an automotive engineering company in Auburn Hills, Mich.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton | January 20, 1992
It was 1969 and Taylor Branch, then a graduate student at Princeton, was determined to sample a little of the powerful movement that was sweeping the South. After academicians reluctantly agreed to let him go, Mr. Branch headed to south Georgia. With $10 a week and a little gas money, he planned to travel the backwoods, educating unregistered black voters."I went and stepped off the end of my world, my known world," the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian recalled yesterday at an East Baltimore church celebrating the birthday of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.And Mr. Branch's version of truth soon clashed with reality.
NEWS
By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2005
DETROIT -- In a seven-hour funeral filled with song and eulogies, thousands of mourners crowded into Greater Grace Temple yesterday to pay final respects to Rosa Louise Parks, the woman whose act of defiance helped spark the civil rights movement. As 4,000 attendees sat in the wooden pews, politicians and religious leaders used the pulpit to warn that the rights that Parks fought for are far from secure. The public must "vote in every election" to protect such things as affirmative action, said Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a New York Democrat.
NEWS
April 15, 2003
Konstantinos "Dino" Yannopoulos, 83, a vocal director whose 50-year career included prestigious opera companies and schools around the world, died April 6 in Philadelphia. He was director of the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia from 1977 to 1987 and artistic director from 1987 to 1989. Mr. Yannopoulos was principal director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York from 1945 to 1977. He also was head of the opera department of the Curtis Institute, artistic director of the Vancouver International Festival and director of the Cincinnati Summer Opera.
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