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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A red-faced state trooper hardly acknowledged Harry Belafonte before a 1967 performance at the University of Baltimore during heat of the civil rights movement. After the show, part of a tour with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an envelope from the trooper awaited the famous black calypso singer and activist at the front desk of the fieldhouse. Inside were six bullets and a letter. "After having met and heard Dr. King and you, I will never fire a weapon ever again," Belafonte said the trooper wrote.
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NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Julia Davidson-Randall knew she was likely to be arrested. But as the Morgan State junior's second day in a Baltimore jail bled into a third, she began to wonder what she had gotten herself into. "I honestly didn't know what was going to happen," she said 48 years later, reflecting on her incarceration for protesting segregation at the Northwood movie theater near Morgan's campus. The Baltimore native was back at Morgan on Thursday to celebrate the unveiling of a permanent exhibit depicting the role she and hundreds of fellow students played in fueling the civil rights movement.
NEWS
By Karsonya Wise Whitehead | August 17, 2014
I would like to write my sons a love letter about peace and post-racial living, of a wonderful time when all people move freely, of a place where black bodies are not endangered and black life is not criminalized. But that is not my story, and it is not their reality. As much as I try, I cannot hide my frustration about what happened to Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., my disgust over what happened to Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y., my outrage over what happened to John Crawford III in Ohio, and my horror over what happened to Ezell Ford in Los Angeles, Calif.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | March 3, 2002
EIGHT MEN sat on the stage at the Polytechnic Institute on Thursday. One was Robert Lumsden, the school's former football coach, who taught at Poly for 38 years. Another was John Clark, who graduated from Poly in the 1960s. The other six were the ones I had come to see and hear. Believe me, I had heard of these guys. They were about one-half of a group of boys who, if there were any justice in the world, would be as famous as the black students who integrated Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., in 1957.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 20, 2008
You want to know who deserves credit for the victories of the civil rights movement? Mother Pollard. She's been largely forgotten over the last two weeks as the leading contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination bickered over who did what in the 13-year epoch that crumbled the walls of American apartheid. Should the lion's share of the recognition go to the president who staked his legacy on enacting laws that made real the promises of democracy? Should it go to the civil rights leader whose courage and eloquence roused the sleeping conscience of the nation?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
For his class assignment, Damian Pitts reluctantly attended a Jewish bar mitzvah in Park Heights. He was pleasantly surprised."They made me feel at ease, even though I was six-four and black and stood out like a sore thumb," the Goucher College junior from Laurel said last week.Having a black student visit a Jewish synagogue is par for the courses taught at Goucher this year by Taylor Branch. Author of two critically acclaimed books on the civil rights movement of the 1960s, Branch is trying to impart his passion for the subject to a new generation -- one for whom the era is ancient history.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | January 14, 2011
There is a new argument as to why the old flagship Read's drugstore in downtown Baltimore must be preserved. I've long argued that the No. 1 of the chain, at Howard and Lexington streets, is an overlooked 1934 architectural gem. Now historians of the civil rights movement in Baltimore have shown the role this building played in the desegregation of 1950s Baltimore. In 1955, after listening to the members of the Baltimore Committee on Racial Equality, the owners of the Read Drug and Chemical Co. gave the word that as of mid-January, all persons, regardless of race, could be seated and served at its soda fountains and lunch counters.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 20, 2003
MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Fairview Plaza is a dingy strip mall near Interstate 65 at the city's edge. But one day, state officials predict, throngs will come to revisit a key point in the civil rights movement. Alabama plans to buy the mall for $2 million to make way for a federally run visitors center. The state also has set aside $1 million to preserve the real draw - the nearby field where participants in the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery voting-rights march camped the night before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led them to the state Capitol.
NEWS
By Sheri L. Parks | April 26, 2010
Dorothy Height, the grande dame of the civil rights movement, died recently in Washington after a long illness. She was 98. Mrs. Height, as everyone called her, was a force in the black civil rights movement for 60 years, 40 of them as the president of National Council of Negro Women. In life and in death, she has been called the matriarch and the queen of the movement. President Barack Obama called her its "godmother." The titles are reverential. She was a tall, stately woman, always perfectly dressed, her voice moderated and mannered.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A red-faced state trooper hardly acknowledged Harry Belafonte before a 1967 performance at the University of Baltimore during heat of the civil rights movement. After the show, part of a tour with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an envelope from the trooper awaited the famous black calypso singer and activist at the front desk of the fieldhouse. Inside were six bullets and a letter. "After having met and heard Dr. King and you, I will never fire a weapon ever again," Belafonte said the trooper wrote.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A state lawmaker and Baltimore Pastor is expected to speak out at Sunday's church service about what he calls "racist comments" by Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy. Del. Emmett Burns, pastor at Rising Sun Baptist Church, plans to warn that "America is on the verge of Civil War" because of comments by Bundy, the Nevada rancher famous for his dispute with the Bureau of Land Management. Bundy became embroiled in controversy last week when he made comments about African Americans and social welfare.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
I really can't tell you why in the last 12 months, I became venomous about Maryland politicians. I've voted for each one of the incumbents on my ballot, and I would like to rescind my vote but I don't know why. Maybe it is because I decided to never vote again unless the Supreme Court was fired and all elected officials were boxed into limited terms. Even the ones I have loved and admired. And then last October, I received an email from a young lady in the neighborhood who was having a meet and greet for Del. Heather Mizeur.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
Monday, Jan 20 MLK breakfast The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast will be held in the David S. Jenkins Gymnasium at Anne Arundel Community College, 101 College Parkway in Arnold. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. Program theme is "The Role of Women in the Civil Rights Movement," with Rep. Donna F. Edwards as keynote speaker. Cost is $35. For tickets, call Eugene Peterson at 301-538-0887 or Erica Matthews at 443-761-9734. Attendees are asked to donate a nonperishable food item as part of a food drive sponsored by the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority and Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
The Columbia Archives is seeking volunteers who lived through the Civil Rights Movement to help Howard County students with their Martin Luther King Jr. Day projects. “This project will connect the people who lived through the March on Washington and the Civil Rights Movement - and personally felt the impact - with some of today's teens who have been impacted in a different way,” said Barbara Kellner, director of the Archives, which is part of the Columbia Association.  On Jan. 20, Howard County will join the nation in celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a day of service.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
"You get up. You are black," the woman screamed as she pointed to a student in the front row to leave. "Segregation now. Segregation forever. " The words were so astounding to this group of eighth-graders that they sat silent and stunned. The woman was Janice Washington, a teacher and civil rights activist who wanted eighth-graders at Sudbrook Middle Magnet School in Baltimore County to feel the same sense of outrage that she had felt as an African-American growing up in Texas, even if just for a second.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
The Rev. Benjamin L. Hooks, former executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, will be the keynote speaker for the 18th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner on Jan. 13, organizers announced this week. The event, which is open to the public, will be held at 6 p.m. at La Fontaine Bleu restaurant, 7514 Ritchie Highway in Glen Burnie. On Jan. 16, a sold-out breakfast in King's honor will also be held, with Frank M. Reid III of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore as the featured speaker, at 8 a.m. at Anne Arundel Community College.
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