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By Joseph R.L. Sterne | October 5, 1999
DID Republican insistence in 1962 on a place for the private sector in space communications help set the stage for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964? This novel insight into the most significant social legislation of this half-century is put forward in a new book, "Mike Mansfield: Majority Leader," by Francis R. "Frank" Valeo, a Senate insider during the turbulent '60s and '70s.Although Mr. Mansfield, at 96, is the deserving hero of the Valeo study, he does not subscribe to the author's linkage of the creation of the Comsat Corp.
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By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
A headline in The Sun on Tuesday -- "The right to say whatever the @%#&! you want" -- recalled for me two encounters with vulgarity back in the decade that the dirty speech movement began. In the summer of 1963, I was the Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Constitution. Washington was girding itself for the "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." That event was meant to pressure the federal government to pass civil rights legislation. It was where Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I have a dream" speech.
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NEWS
By Newsday | April 18, 1991
WHITE HOUSE officials are being blatantly disingenuous when they say they want a civil rights bill that President Bush can sign. Chief of Staff John Sununu and presidential counsel C. Boyden Gray, in fact, seem bent on sandbagging every effort to reach a compromise over quotas, the unresolved issue that Bush said forced him to veto the civil rights bill that Congress passed last year.If he really wants a bill, Bush himself needs to step in now, and call off aides who are working against compromise.
NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne | October 5, 1999
DID Republican insistence in 1962 on a place for the private sector in space communications help set the stage for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964? This novel insight into the most significant social legislation of this half-century is put forward in a new book, "Mike Mansfield: Majority Leader," by Francis R. "Frank" Valeo, a Senate insider during the turbulent '60s and '70s.Although Mr. Mansfield, at 96, is the deserving hero of the Valeo study, he does not subscribe to the author's linkage of the creation of the Comsat Corp.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has rejected a compromise plan on civil rights legislation offered by moderate Republicans, forcing a showdown between Congress and the White House.A disappointed Sen. John C. Danforth, R-Mo., chief sponsor of the GOP proposal, made public a letter from Bush that --ed the Missourian's months-long hopes of breaking a stalemate between the White House and Congress over the controversial bill."I think it's a serious mistake for the president, his administration and the Republican Party to try to turn the clock back on civil rights," Danforth said yesterday.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, D-Maine, is charging that President Bush has created racial disharmony and "sabotaged" private talks aimed at forging a compromise on legislation to combat job discrimination against minorities and women.Expressing hope -- but no optimism --that an agreement may yet be reached, Mitchell said yesterday that four Democratic senators he appointed are working with nine moderate Republicans in an effort to reach a consensus on a bill that would be acceptable to Bush.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The leader of nine Senate Republicans trying to reach a compromise with the Bush administration on civil rights legislation said yesterday that he would not negotiate any further and that White House Chief of Staff John Sununu offers no movement.Sen. John C. Danforth, R-Mo., who has been leading the compromise effort, announced that he was introducing new civil rights legislation embodying those agreements the Republican senators had been able to reach in word-by-word negotiations with Mr. Sununu and Attorney General Richard L. Thornburgh.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | August 16, 1992
There were advances in civil rights and equal opportunity during the Bush years, but not always with the president's blessing.Of the two pieces of major civil rights legislation enacted during his administration, one had Mr. Bush's firm support. The other made it into law almost in spite of him.Perhaps the most sweeping civil rights legislation of the last quarter century was passed in 1989 to insure the 43,000 disabled Americans equal access to public accommodations, transportation and job opportunities.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | October 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Civil rights leaders, engaged in last-ditch efforts to convince President Bush to sign into law the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1990, saw a glimmer of a chance yesterday that Mr. Bush might be persuaded not to carry out his threat to veto the measure.As demonstrators marched outside the White House urging Mr. Bush to sign the legislation, the civil rights leaders sought one more meeting with the president before he makes, as they said, "a final decision on this vital and historic legislation."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | October 9, 1992
Taking the offensive in the 1st Congressional District race, Tom McMillen last night tried to portray his opponent, Wayne Gilchrest, as a conservative willing to cut Medicare insurance and student loan funds, and to vote against strong civil rights legislation.While Mr. Gilchrest spent most of the time at two candidate forums talking about what he believes is wrong with the country and what he would do to fix it, Mr. McMillen tried to contrast his actions with those of Mr. Gilchrest. For example, he pointed to his support of the original civil rights bill which contained stronger language than the version finally adopted.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
The Maryland NAACP endorsed a white liberal for state treasurer over a conservative African-American some members believe is unfriendly to their causes, the group announced last night.State Del. Pauline H. Menes, a Democrat from Prince George's County, has shown more courage and commitment to civil rights legislation than Del. Richard N. Dixon, said Hanley J. Norment, president of the state conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.Meanwhile, Mr. Dixon, a Carroll County Democrat, solidified his front-runner status for the post last night by capturing, in a 16-8 vote, the recommendation of a joint legislative selection committee.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN Jr | April 11, 1993
The Senate filibuster ought to have a romantic, courageous resonance in a nation that praises individuality and admires the minority that stands up to an overbearing majority.But filibustering isn't romanticized or admired, because Southern senators opposed to basic civil rights for black Americans gave the exercise a bad name.From 1917 to 1961, there were nine filibusters directed against civil rights bills. (Plus two directed against changing the filibuster rule.) All succeeded. The defeated legislation in every case was as strongly supported in the rest of the nation as it was opposed in the South.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | October 9, 1992
Taking the offensive in the 1st Congressional District race, Tom McMillen last night tried to portray his opponent, Wayne Gilchrest, as a conservative willing to cut Medicare insurance and student loan funds, and to vote against strong civil rights legislation.While Mr. Gilchrest spent most of the time at two candidate forums talking about what he believes is wrong with the country and what he would do to fix it, Mr. McMillen tried to contrast his actions with those of Mr. Gilchrest. For example, he pointed to his support of the original civil rights bill which contained stronger language than the version finally adopted.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | August 16, 1992
There were advances in civil rights and equal opportunity during the Bush years, but not always with the president's blessing.Of the two pieces of major civil rights legislation enacted during his administration, one had Mr. Bush's firm support. The other made it into law almost in spite of him.Perhaps the most sweeping civil rights legislation of the last quarter century was passed in 1989 to insure the 43,000 disabled Americans equal access to public accommodations, transportation and job opportunities.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Male legislators who oppose a state civil rights bill penalizing sexual harassment say no one knows what sex harassment really is -- and they convinced enough colleagues to put the bill's future in doubt yesterday.The broad civil rights legislation fell one vote short of passage, but the House of Delegates will reconsider it today.Del. Kenneth H. Masters, D-Baltimore County, cited the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill harassment hearings in Congress and said none of his colleagues knows what really constitutes harassment in the workplace.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Male legislators who oppose a state civil rights bill penalizing sexual harassment say no one knows what sex harassment really is -- and they convinced enough colleagues to put the bill's future in doubt.The broad civil rights legislation fell one vote short of passage yesterday, but the House of Delegates will reconsider it today.Del. Kenneth H. Masters, D-Balto. Co., cited the Senate hearings investigating sexual harassment allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas by Anita Hill and said none of his colleagues knows what really constitutes harassment in the workplace.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A group of seven moderate Senate Republicans announced yesterday yet another attempt to fashion a civil rights bill that would be acceptable to the Bush administration. The White House, however, appeared to reject it.Sen. John C. Danforth, the Missouri Republican who has been leading the group's search for a compromise bill ever since President Bush vetoed last year's measure, said the senators were introducing a measure that would apply to minorities and women the exact anti-discrimination language in a law approved last year by Mr. Bush to protect disabled workers' rights.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
The Maryland NAACP endorsed a white liberal for state treasurer over a conservative African-American some members believe is unfriendly to their causes, the group announced last night.State Del. Pauline H. Menes, a Democrat from Prince George's County, has shown more courage and commitment to civil rights legislation than Del. Richard N. Dixon, said Hanley J. Norment, president of the state conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.Meanwhile, Mr. Dixon, a Carroll County Democrat, solidified his front-runner status for the post last night by capturing, in a 16-8 vote, the recommendation of a joint legislative selection committee.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A group of seven moderate Senate Republicans announced yesterday yet another attempt to fashion a civil rights bill that would be acceptable to the Bush administration. The White House, however, appeared to reject it.Sen. John C. Danforth, the Missouri Republican who has been leading the group's search for a compromise bill ever since President Bush vetoed last year's measure, said the senators were introducing a measure that would apply to minorities and women the exact anti-discrimination language in a law approved last year by Mr. Bush to protect disabled workers' rights.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has rejected a compromise plan on civil rights legislation offered by moderate Republicans, forcing a showdown between Congress and the White House.A disappointed Sen. John C. Danforth, R-Mo., chief sponsor of the GOP proposal, made public a letter from Bush that --ed the Missourian's months-long hopes of breaking a stalemate between the White House and Congress over the controversial bill."I think it's a serious mistake for the president, his administration and the Republican Party to try to turn the clock back on civil rights," Danforth said yesterday.
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