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NEWS
By Newsday | August 15, 1991
DISSIMULATION can be a useful skill for a politician, but the Bush administration overdoes it -- especially on civil rights. Congress can't make the executive branch talk straight on these issues, but it can and should pass a civil rights bill that will mitigate the effects of the administration's indifference and hypocrisy.Consider three recent events:* Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin released a report on the "glass ceiling" that prevents women and minorities from reaching the top executive levels at many corporations.
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 9, 1995
ON HEARING that the Washington chapter of the National Urban League was planning to honor Sen. Strom Thurmond, Kweisi Mfume said he asked himself, "if this was the same Strom Thurmond I grew up with in this country."The obvious answer is, "Everybody grew up with this Strom Thurmond!" He has been in the public eye (and on the public payroll) since the year Bob Dole was born, 1923.In the year Representative Mfume was born, 1948, Senator Thurmond ran for president as a "Dixiecrat." He and other Southerners walked out on the Democratic Party to protest the platform's civil rights plank.
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NEWS
By Helen Delich Bentley | July 22, 1991
EVERY fair-minded person supports the basic intent of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was designed to open long-closed doors to blacks and other minority groups in our society.TC As both a woman and a person of ethnic background, I have experienced discrimination throughout my youth and prior career, so I'm sympathetic to the grievances still felt by many in our society.I'm also mindful that I represent black constituents in both Harford and Baltimore counties, and I have been a leader in the drive to expand black participation in the Republican Party, the party of Lincoln and emancipation.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Supporters of a state civil rights bill barely mustered enough votes to push it through the Maryland House of Delegates yesterday, and they face an even more difficult time in the Senate.The controversial bill has been sent to the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, one of the most conservative in the General Assembly.Committee Chairman Walter M. Baker, D-Cecil, declined to speculate on its chances. "I haven't even read it yet. I don't rely on newspapers" for information on a bill, he said.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration signaled yesterday that the president will veto a new civil rights bill if it remains, as it is now, similar to the one he vetoed last year.That indication launched what is likely to be a bitter and protracted political debate over whether the bill would pave the way for employers to use racial hiring quotas.John R. Dunne, assistant attorney general for civil rights, told the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Civil Rights that the proposed 1991 bill would result in the use of quotas and, therefore, that it "is not legislation the administration can support."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The SunWashington Bureau of The Sun | October 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- As if things weren't going badly enough with the budget crisis and threat of war in the Persian Gulf, President Bush awoke this morning to face the prospect of another jolt to his popularity from his anticipated veto of a major civil rights bill.After months of negotiations with the White House that ultimately failed, the House followed the Senate's lead yesterday by giving final approval to a measure designed to combat discrimination in the workplace by making it easier for victims to get their grievances addressed.
NEWS
By Nicole Weisensee and Nicole Weisensee,States News Service | October 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The political storm over Anita Hill's allegations that Judge Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her is unlikely to give much of a boost to the civil rights bill, which President Bush has threatened to veto, political analysts say.Many Thomas supporters emphasized during Senate debate that they are against sexual harassment but just did not believe Hill. Yet those same senators are unlikely to vote this week for a civil rights bill that would, for the first time, allow victims of such abuse to collect punitive damages.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 12, 1991
Washington -- PRESIDENT Bush's signing of the civil rights bill reinstating standards for proving job discrimination thrown out by the Supreme Court in 1989 will not write an end to one lingering aspect of the controversy.Democratic Rep. James McDermott of Washington state is introducing this week legislation to undo a provision in the civil rights bill that explicitly exempts the very case that triggered the original Supreme Court decision.The case was a class action brought in 1974 against the Wards Cove Packing Company, which operates salmon canneries along the long coastline of Alaska, charging the company discriminated in job hiring and working conditions of minority workers, primarily of native Alaskan and Asian descent.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson | October 27, 1991
The success of former Ku Klux Klansman David Duke as a Republican gubernatorial candidate in Louisiana and the possibility of losing an important battle with the U.S. Senate forced President Bush to support a civil rights bill in Congress, civil rights leader Julian Bond told a gathering of Maryland NAACP leaders yesterday."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With the House scheduled to vote on the civil rights bill as early as tomorrow, Democratic congressional leaders charge that President Bush wants a political issue for 1992 more than a new law this year and is deliberately misrepresenting their attempt at compromise.In sharply worded responses to Bush's attack a day earlier on the Democratic-sponsored civil rights measure, House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri and Rep. Don Edwards of California yesterday sought to take the moral high ground on an issue that has taken on enormous political symbolism for both sides.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Supporters of a state civil rights bill barely mustered enough votes to push it through the Maryland House of Delegates yesterday, and they face an even more difficult time in the Senate.The controversial bill has been sent to the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, one of the most conservative in the General Assembly.Committee Chairman Walter M. Baker, D-Cecil, declined to speculate on its chances. "I haven't even read it yet. I don't rely on newspapers" for information on a bill, he said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Male legislators who oppose a state civil rights bill penalizing sexual harassment say no one knows what sex harassment really is -- and they convinced enough colleagues to put the bill's future in doubt.The broad civil rights legislation fell one vote short of passage yesterday, but the House of Delegates will reconsider it today.Del. Kenneth H. Masters, D-Balto. Co., cited the Senate hearings investigating sexual harassment allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas by Anita Hill and said none of his colleagues knows what really constitutes harassment in the workplace.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | November 26, 1991
Washington -- George Bush postured for years as a friend of civil rights, affirmative action, racial justice. But he learned in 1988 that the route to electoral victory was to pander to the fears, resentments, paranoia and hatreds of white males in particular and the middle class in general.HTC Now, in what will be a futile effort to appease the David Dukes and Pat Buchanans of America, Mr. Bush has embraced the unconscionable tactic of pretending to be a friend of civil rights while at the same time declaring all-out war on the rules and laws that have produced the great civil-rights gains of the last 40 years.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 12, 1991
Washington -- PRESIDENT Bush's signing of the civil rights bill reinstating standards for proving job discrimination thrown out by the Supreme Court in 1989 will not write an end to one lingering aspect of the controversy.Democratic Rep. James McDermott of Washington state is introducing this week legislation to undo a provision in the civil rights bill that explicitly exempts the very case that triggered the original Supreme Court decision.The case was a class action brought in 1974 against the Wards Cove Packing Company, which operates salmon canneries along the long coastline of Alaska, charging the company discriminated in job hiring and working conditions of minority workers, primarily of native Alaskan and Asian descent.
NEWS
By The Morning News Tribune, Tacoma, Wash | October 31, 1991
WHAT'S THE price of playing politics with people's civil rights? For America's workers, it comes to two years of lost protection. It was two years ago that the Supreme Court issued a series of rulings stripping minorities and women of legal safeguards against job discrimination -- safeguards they'd taken for granted since 1971. It was two years ago that a majority of the lawmakers on Capitol Hill agreed that those safeguards should be restored.But it wasn't until last Thursday that the Republican president and the Democratic leaders of the Senate came up with compromise legislation they all could live with.
NEWS
By R. A. Zaldivar and Alexis Moore and R. A. Zaldivar and Alexis Moore,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After nearly two years of divisive politics pitting whites against blacks in the workplace, the Senate overwhelmingly approved yesterday a civil rights compromise with hopes for a calmer era in race relations.The deal between the Bush administration and a bipartisan Senate coalition was passed 93-5. The House also is expected to pass the bill. President Bush, who vetoed last year's version, has said he is ready to sign it.The Senate action ended a fight between the Bush administration and the Democratic-controlled Congress over whether stronger civil rights laws would lead to quotas in hiring and promotion.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 23, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush took on the political burden yesterday of vetoing a major civil rights bill, choosing to avoid what he called the greater evil of imposing racial, gender and ethnic quotas in the workplace."
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- As the Senate civil rights bill nears a final vote, leaders of the black civil rights establishment are pleased at the prospect that President Bush will eventually sign it into law. But there is no joy among them.Even with their success, after two years, in moving the president to the point of compromise, they fear a further erosion of civil rights by a conservative Supreme Court.Late last night, the Associated Press reported that the Senate leadership announced that a vote on passage of the civil rights bill would not take place until today.
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