Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCivil Rights Act
IN THE NEWS

Civil Rights Act

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 31, 2014
Fifty years ago this summer, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, marking a watershed moment in our nation's history and in the ongoing struggle of African-Americans for fair and equal treatment. The passage of the law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin, and ended voter discrimination and segregation of schools, came amidst a tumultuous period that saw sit-ins, marches and mass protests staged from major cities to college campuses of every size.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The director of Baltimore's African-American history museum on Thursday defended his decision to bar a civil rights leader from an event marking the 50th anniversary of landmark legislation after she questioned the decision to include a convicted murderer among the honorees. A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, said he barred Helena Hicks, 80, from the premises last week because he "could not be assured that she would be respectful and courteous to other panel members and in the presence of our audience" and "she might not be tolerant.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
I was traveling alone in Georgia during the summer of 1964 to visit relatives, and vividly recall that a year after the March on Washington, a sense of racial tension still permeated much of the South. I was from New Jersey, my mother was from Macon, Ga., and when we would visit her family during summers in the 1950s, she made no attempt to politely explain away the signs of segregation that marked "colored" waiting rooms in railroad stations and bus terminals or the signs directing African-Americans to "colored" restrooms, restaurants and roadside hotels.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 31, 2014
Fifty years ago this summer, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, marking a watershed moment in our nation's history and in the ongoing struggle of African-Americans for fair and equal treatment. The passage of the law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin, and ended voter discrimination and segregation of schools, came amidst a tumultuous period that saw sit-ins, marches and mass protests staged from major cities to college campuses of every size.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 29, 2014
"But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep. " -- Robert Frost Sen. Richard Russell called it a work of "manifold evils. " Sen. Barry Goldwater called it a "threat to the very essence" of America. Rep. Howard Smith called it a "monstrous instrument of oppression. " It was the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and its "oppression," "threat" and "evil," at least in the eyes of those conservative men, were that it outlawed racial discrimination in public places.
BUSINESS
By Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1990
WASHINGTON -- American companies will get the final word from the Supreme Court, the justices promised yesterday, on whether they must obey overseas the U.S. civil rights law against job bias.In a brief order, the court said it will decide in its just-opened term for or against global application of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which forbids employers to discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion or national origin.A deeply divided federal appeals court in New Orleans ruled in February that the law does not apply to U.S. companies employing U.S. citizens outside the U.S. borders.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A compromise that Congress accepted three years ago to get a major civil rights bill past President George Bush's opposition led the Supreme Court yesterday to bar any use of that law against acts of bias that happened before 1991.As a result, thousands of women, blacks and other minorities with cases still in the courts will be unable to take advantage of the sweeping new protection written into the Civil Rights Act of 1991. Employers will avoid potential damage claims in millions of dollars that workers could have won under the law.By a vote of 8-1, with only retiring Justice Harry A. Blackmun in dissent, the court ruled yesterday that no part of the law is retroactive.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson called on African-Americans to use their right to vote this year in a speech at the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday marking the 40th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Jackson, who registered more than 3 million new voters in his presidential campaigns in the 1980s, said the Bush administration was a "huge threat to the civil rights and social justice of all Americans" for not meeting with civil rights and...
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Everyone begged William Lewis Moore not to go to Mississippi. His pastor told him he would get killed walking around in a sandwich board sign protesting segregation. His family worried about where he would sleep and eat. Even fellow civil rights activists told the Baltimore postal worker it was a bad idea to walk hundreds of miles through the heart of the South. But Moore insisted on hand-delivering a letter to the governor of Mississippi, urging the staunch segregationist to change.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
Your front-page article detailing Baltimore's intimate connection to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 made for interesting reading ( "Equality's struggles," June 28). Just look at Baltimore 50 years later. When you get past the Inner Harbor what do you see? Decay, poverty, high murder rates, drugs, failing schools, one-parent families - and the list goes on. What did the Civil Rights Act of 1964 give us, and what did we learn from it? The lesson is that the emphasis on civil rights, without a corresponding emphasis on civil responsibility, gets you the wrong result.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
Your front-page article detailing Baltimore's intimate connection to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 made for interesting reading ( "Equality's struggles," June 28). Just look at Baltimore 50 years later. When you get past the Inner Harbor what do you see? Decay, poverty, high murder rates, drugs, failing schools, one-parent families - and the list goes on. What did the Civil Rights Act of 1964 give us, and what did we learn from it? The lesson is that the emphasis on civil rights, without a corresponding emphasis on civil responsibility, gets you the wrong result.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 29, 2014
"But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep. " -- Robert Frost Sen. Richard Russell called it a work of "manifold evils. " Sen. Barry Goldwater called it a "threat to the very essence" of America. Rep. Howard Smith called it a "monstrous instrument of oppression. " It was the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and its "oppression," "threat" and "evil," at least in the eyes of those conservative men, were that it outlawed racial discrimination in public places.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 24, 2014
"Discrimination," he said, "is horrible. It's hurtful. It has no place in civilized society... " You would think that statement, delivered recently in the Kansas legislature, a noble sentiment no right-thinking person could argue with. But we are gathered here today to argue with it. Because it turns out that when Republican legislator Charles Macheers said "discrimination," he didn't mean, well ... discrimination. Mr. Macheers sponsored a bill -- passed overwhelmingly by the Kansas House, but killed last week by the Senate in an attack of common sense -- that sought to exempt any business or government employee from providing "any services, accommodations, advantages, facilities, goods or privileges" related to any "marriage, domestic partnership, civil union or similar arrangement" if doing so would conflict with the employee's" sincerely held religious beliefs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
I was traveling alone in Georgia during the summer of 1964 to visit relatives, and vividly recall that a year after the March on Washington, a sense of racial tension still permeated much of the South. I was from New Jersey, my mother was from Macon, Ga., and when we would visit her family during summers in the 1950s, she made no attempt to politely explain away the signs of segregation that marked "colored" waiting rooms in railroad stations and bus terminals or the signs directing African-Americans to "colored" restrooms, restaurants and roadside hotels.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 18, 2013
Four words of advice for African-Americans in the wake of George Zimmerman's acquittal: Wake the hell up. The Sunday after Mr. Zimmerman went free was a day of protest for many of us. From Biscayne Boulevard in Miami to Leimert Park in Los Angeles, to the Daley Center in Chicago to Times Square in New York City, African-Americans -- and others who believe in racial justice -- carried out angry but mostly peaceful demonstrations. Good. This is as it should have been. But if that's the end, if you just get it out of your system, then move ahead with business as usual, then all you did Sunday was waste your time.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 14, 2013
The American clock brings us to the 50th anniversaries of two extraordinary events involving two extraordinary women, Gloria Richardson Dandridge and Madalyn Murray O'Hair — both strong-willed champions of liberty and disturbers of the status quo, but women of very different character, purpose and legacy. One is now 91 years old, long esteemed as a brave civil rights leader who refused to smile on demand and who famously brushed away a bayonet. The other was a noisy atheist, reviled as the most hated woman in America; she died a violent death nearly two decades ago. This month marks 50 years since the race riots in Cambridge, the small city on Maryland's Eastern Shore that became a crucible for civil rights in 1963.
NEWS
By Dr. Keiffer J. Mitchell | September 21, 2004
AT A FORUM in Baltimore marking the 40th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, some participants questioned the effectiveness of that law and other landmarks of civil rights. They noted the sad conditions in which many African-Americans live, the well-documented and persistent disparities in health, employment, educational attainment and mortality. And they asked why more hasn't been done to remediate the civil wrongs against African-Americans that have endured in our society. While they correctly conclude that the giant steps forward in civil rights fell short of fixing all wrongs, I would caution anyone who overlooks or disparages their value.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 3, 2008
This is for those who think I forgot the Civil Rights Act of 1964. But first, let me tell you why I respect former Sen. Bob Dole. During his last campaign for the presidency, he spoke at a black journalists convention where he was politely, though not enthusiastically, received. Mr. Dole acknowledged that the audience had reason for reserve, given that he's a conservative Republican, and conservative Republicans have historically shown little regard for the concerns of black people. He asked for their support anyway and promised that, if given a chance, he would improve that sorry record.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Everyone begged William Lewis Moore not to go to Mississippi. His pastor told him he would get killed walking around in a sandwich board sign protesting segregation. His family worried about where he would sleep and eat. Even fellow civil rights activists told the Baltimore postal worker it was a bad idea to walk hundreds of miles through the heart of the South. But Moore insisted on hand-delivering a letter to the governor of Mississippi, urging the staunch segregationist to change.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
National advocacy groups for people with Down syndrome are seeking an independent investigation into the January death of a Frederick County man after off-duty sheriff's deputies tried to remove him from a movie theater. Robert Ethan Saylor, 25, suffocated on Jan. 12 after three Frederick County sheriff's deputies attempted to remove him from the Theater 9 Westview Cinemas in Frederick. He died later at a local hospital. "We want to just find out more information to see if Ethan's rights as an individual with a disability were violated.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.