Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCivil Libertarians
IN THE NEWS

Civil Libertarians

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Saying dejectedly that they have seen it all before, civil rights groups and activists foresee serious new threats to individual liberties from the rising demand among politicians for a crackdown on militant anti-government forces.As President Clinton widened his public complaint yesterday against those who "spread hate" and official Washington planned to move swiftly on new "counterterrorism" proposals, civil libertarians argued strenuously against going too far.But the fear being expressed from more liberal groups was also matched by some concern in conservative circles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Three of the most popular books in America are being kept off the shelves of the Harford County Public Library system because administrators consider them to be pornographic. British author E.L. James' erotic trilogy about a steamy affair between an innocent literature student and an entrepreneur with dangerous desires has topped the list of Amazon.com's best-selling books. Ditto for the New York Times' best-selling fiction list. Every other library system in Central Maryland owns copies of "Fifty Shades of Grey" and its two sequels, and maintains waiting lists of hundreds of eager readers who want to check them out. Harford County's reluctance to purchase the novels in the face of overwhelming public demand and accusations of censorship places it in among an embattled minority of libraries nationwide.
Advertisement
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 5, 1996
First came the scamboogahs -- disrespectful, low-down, foul people, according to that eminent sage and philosopher, former heavyweight boxing champion Joe Frazier.Scamboogahs beget poot-butts, a latter-day term meaning a lazy, irresponsible lout with no goal or direction in life. Every neighborhood -- black, white, Asian, Hispanic, integrated -- has its share of scamboogahs and poot-butts. In the inner cities of Baltimore, they are the ones who loiter on or near the property of those folks who get up and go to work daily.
NEWS
By Clark Kent Ervin | August 5, 2007
Among the many urgent questions raised by 9/11 was how, exactly, to strike the optimal balance between security, on the one hand, and civil rights and civil liberties on the other. At times since 9/11, the government has weighed in too heavily on the side of security. The domestic call tracking program is a conspicuous case in point. The effort, first reported in May 2006 by USA Today, to keep track of potentially billions of calls within the United States, even when there is no apparent tie to terrorism, is a huge imposition on our civil rights and civil liberties, for little if any gain in security.
NEWS
April 25, 1994
U.S. District Court Judge Wayne Anderson ruled early this month that warrantless searches for weapons and drugs by law enforcement officers in Chicago housing projects could not continue. The police had been "sweeping" through the projects searching for contraband and criminals. The judge said that without warrants for "probable cause" that a crime had been committed, such sweeps were unconstitutional. He said sweeps were "a greater evil than the danger of criminal activity."Go tell that to the residents of the Robert Taylor Homes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - The nation's police chiefs are going to Congress today to push their legislative agendas, including the right to take DNA samples from people arrested on suspicion of violent crimes. The proposal has alarmed some civil libertarians, but the president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police says it is no different from the routine practice of fingerprinting suspects. "We're not talking about sticking a needle in somebody and drawing blood," Bruce D. Glasscock, the association's president, said in an interview as more than 100 fellow chiefs and police superintendents began assembling yesterday to fan out across Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Civil liberties warriors are once again having a field day over a decision by Attorney General John Ashcroft, this time his sweeping new policy of mass fingerprinting and photographing of foreign visitors. About 100,000 of them coming here each year from countries that may have harbored terrorists and thousands more already in this country are to have their fingers rolled and their mug shots taken in what the critics attack as racial and ethnic profiling. Mr. Ashcroft already was their favorite target for a range of actions out of his Justice Department.
NEWS
By Clark Kent Ervin | August 5, 2007
Among the many urgent questions raised by 9/11 was how, exactly, to strike the optimal balance between security, on the one hand, and civil rights and civil liberties on the other. At times since 9/11, the government has weighed in too heavily on the side of security. The domestic call tracking program is a conspicuous case in point. The effort, first reported in May 2006 by USA Today, to keep track of potentially billions of calls within the United States, even when there is no apparent tie to terrorism, is a huge imposition on our civil rights and civil liberties, for little if any gain in security.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
In the wake of terrorist assaults on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, civil libertarians are sounding the alarm over electronic surveillance proposals aimed at helping law enforcement catch hijackers and bombers before they commit their crimes. They're worried about how the FBI and other police agencies plan to intercept information transmitted by the electronic gadgets - computers, cellular telephones and pagers - that have become ubiquitous in American life. And that unease crosses political and ideological lines, with both conservative and liberal organizations calling for Congress to take the Bush administration's emergency law enforcement bills off the fast track.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Seeking to avoid a legislative battle, the state's health data collectors and the state medical society have agreed to additional privacy protections in the state's database.But some privacy advocates are unhappy over the agreement, saying it helps doctors more than patients and takes the medical society -- with its lobbying power -- out of the coalition pushing for more regulations to guarantee confidentiality.At issue is the information being collected by the Health Care Access and Cost Commission (HCACC)
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | January 13, 2006
SEATTLE -- Most of us are not Patrick Henry and would be willing to lose a great deal of freedom in order to save our lives. It's not even necessarily deplorable. Giving up a certain amount of freedom in exchange for the safety and comfort of civilized society is what government is all about, according to guys like Hobbes and Locke, who influenced the Founding Fathers. And that's good government. Many people live under bad governments that take away more freedom than necessary, and these people choose not to become heroes.
NEWS
By Richard Schmitt and Richard Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Underscoring changes in domestic surveillance allowed under the USA Patriot Act, the Justice Department said in a report released yesterday that it conducted hundreds more secret searches around the United States last year under foreign intelligence surveillance laws. The department said the use of covert search powers, which were enhanced under the Patriot Act, shows how federal investigators have stepped up the war against terrorism in the United States over the past 32 months.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court turned away a final challenge yesterday to the Bush administration's policy of keeping secret the names of hundreds of Middle Eastern men who were picked up for questioning after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Without comment, the justices refused to hear a dispute largely overtaken by events. At least 750 men were arrested in a government roundup after the attacks, but nearly all of them had been deported or released by June 2002. Only one, Zacarias Moussaoui, was charged in connection with the al-Qaida attacks, although his case has stalled over a dispute about potential witnesses.
TOPIC
By Robert Cohen and Robert Cohen,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | December 1, 2002
WASHINGTON - A series of recent court victories and initiatives by the Bush administration in its domestic war on terrorism has added to the growing concern that civil liberties are becoming a casualty of the conflict. A special appeals court ruled last month that the government has sweeping powers to listen to telephone calls, read e-mails and conduct searches in pursuit of terrorists in the United States. Another appeals court said the judiciary has no business interfering with the military jailing prisoners seized in the Afghanistan war indefinitely.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Civil liberties warriors are once again having a field day over a decision by Attorney General John Ashcroft, this time his sweeping new policy of mass fingerprinting and photographing of foreign visitors. About 100,000 of them coming here each year from countries that may have harbored terrorists and thousands more already in this country are to have their fingers rolled and their mug shots taken in what the critics attack as racial and ethnic profiling. Mr. Ashcroft already was their favorite target for a range of actions out of his Justice Department.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 19, 2001
WASHINGTON -- In June 1942, six months after the United States entered World War II, a small cadre of German agents disembarked from two U-boats onto American soil with more than $175,000, bundles of explosives and orders to destroy U.S. factories, bridges and canals. The plot failed when the will of one of the men faltered and he alerted the FBI. Rather than try the trained saboteurs in civilian court, though, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created a secret military tribunal to hear their case -- exactly what President Bush has proposed for suspected terrorists in the United States' fight against terrorism.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court turned away a final challenge yesterday to the Bush administration's policy of keeping secret the names of hundreds of Middle Eastern men who were picked up for questioning after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Without comment, the justices refused to hear a dispute largely overtaken by events. At least 750 men were arrested in a government roundup after the attacks, but nearly all of them had been deported or released by June 2002. Only one, Zacarias Moussaoui, was charged in connection with the al-Qaida attacks, although his case has stalled over a dispute about potential witnesses.
NEWS
By Pat Truly | August 13, 1997
AT WHAT POINT does a useful profile become an ugly stereotype?Strangely enough, this is an issue in airline safety.The White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security dominoed last winter with 53 recommendations, ranging from the use of more bomb-sniffing dogs to experimenting with matching luggage to passengers (to avoid having an "extra" and explosive suitcase on board).The commission was set up in the wake of the still-mysterious explosion aboard TWA Flight 800 off Long Island. Mysterious to everyone except Pierre Salinger, anyway.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush signed into law yesterday a sweeping anti-terrorism measure that will give law enforcement and intelligence agencies broad new powers to detain suspects, secretly search their homes and eavesdrop on telephone and e-mail conversations. Supporters said that federal authorities will now have the investigative tools they need to hunt down terrorists and protect Americans from new attacks. Civil libertarians warn, though, that the new law will likely imperil the rights of innocent people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
In the wake of terrorist assaults on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, civil libertarians are sounding the alarm over electronic surveillance proposals aimed at helping law enforcement catch hijackers and bombers before they commit their crimes. They're worried about how the FBI and other police agencies plan to intercept information transmitted by the electronic gadgets - computers, cellular telephones and pagers - that have become ubiquitous in American life. And that unease crosses political and ideological lines, with both conservative and liberal organizations calling for Congress to take the Bush administration's emergency law enforcement bills off the fast track.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.