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By Gilbert Sandler | June 20, 1995
NEXT MONDAY, at precisely 1 p.m., if you are outdoors and paying attention, you will hear warning sirens blare from the tops of certain strategically located buildings scattered throughout the Baltimore area. Those sirens are sounding (as they have since 1964) the good news: the Russians aren't coming.That has been the news since the sirens first assumed their peacetime role, beginning on the early afternoon of Monday, July 6, 1964, when they became an official part of the city's (and the state's)
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September 29, 2011
From the pages of the Havre de Grace Record dated Thursday morning, Sept. 28, 1961: The big news, at least judging from the size of the blaring headline, was Civil Defense. "Civil Defense Mass Meeting Set," it said, accompanied by the smaller headline: "County Unit Swamped With Requests For Information. " A public meeting was scheduled for Oct. 4 at Bel Air High School and it was hoped those who had questions would travel to the county seat for information. The other two hot topics on the front page were "Mass Rally To Promote Full Use Of Bainbridge By Navy" and "Sewage Discharge In Shore Channel At Stake In Bay. " They would be news stories of interest to the Record area for years.
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NEWS
May 27, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Robert Carmody O'Brien, a World War II veteran who took part in the D-day invasion, will be offered at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church in Towson.Mr. O'Brien, a retired Maryland Civil Defense official and former steel company manager, died Saturday at his Towson home after a long illness. He was 79.Born in Crafton, Pennsylvania, Mr. O'Brien was the oldest of five children. He attended the University of Pittsburgh, majoring in business and going to work soon after college for U.S. Steel in Gary, Ind.He joined the U.S. Army infantry to fight in World War II, and remained in the Army Reserve until the age of 60 when he retired with the rank of lieutenant colonel.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 13, 2008
Walter D. Hyle Jr., a former Civil Defense director for Baltimore County who had been manager of the old Bay Shore Park, died of a heart attack May 6 at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Parkville resident was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised on Luzerne Avenue, he attended St. Andrew's Parochial School and was a 1936 Calvert Hall College High School graduate. He was later active in its Quarterback Club. He served in the Army from 1940 to 1944 and was later in the Maryland National Guard. He managed Bay Shore Park in the 1940s and held the same position at New Bay Shore Park on the Chesapeake Bay. He worked for the Internal Revenue Service until being named Civil Defense director for Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
Had Russia dropped the big one, this was the place to be: deep beneath fire station No. 9 in a bunker with 17-inch concrete walls, an emergency power generator and enough water to last its occupants -- Baltimore's mayor and 20 or so top city officials -- for two weeks. Prepared as the city was -- warning sirens tuned, evacuation plan ready, more than 1,000 public fallout shelters stocked -- the big one never came. And as the nuclear bomb threat dwindled, so did the city office of Disaster Management and Civil Defense.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 19, 2008
Robert Eugene Williams Jr., a retired Baltimore Civil Defense worker, died of cancer Thursday at his Stoneleigh home. He was 81. Mr. Williams was born and raised in Waverly and was a 1944 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. After serving in the Navy near the end of World War II, he went to work for the city water department before enrolling at Washington College. In 1947, he went to work as an engineering officer for the city's Civil Defense Disaster Control Board. He retired in 1990.
NEWS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Dan Mihalopoulos,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
PARAMUS, N.J. -- Hoping to avoid feeling helpless if terrorists strike again, 25 suburbanites gather each week in this town about 10 miles from Manhattan to ponder tough questions. What is the best way to drag your neighbors from a collapsed building in the aftermath of a terrorist attack? And what should you do if terrorists release poison gas at the local mall? "War has just started, and God only knows what these wackos will do next," instructor Maria Kosciolek warned students at a recent civil defense class here.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
In his underground office deep beneath the Towson courthouse, Col. John Thompson flips through his doomsday file, a grim plan detailing Baltimore County's response to nuclear Armageddon.Thompson suspects that it is the file, not mankind, whose days are numbered."I always felt the Soviet Union would fall by the year 2000," says Thompson, the county's deputy director of Civil Defense."There's no reason for us to keep our nuclear weapons if [the Soviets] get rid of theirs."Both superpowers seem eager to put the nuclear nightmare to rest, and local Civil Defense officials welcome the prospect of silencing air raid sirens and converting 30-year-old survival crackers into animal feed.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2004
It was a big sound in its day - loud, off-key and impossible to dance to - and, with a push from the government, it captured the imagination of a generation. Then it all but disappeared. Faster than you can say "civil defense," the wail of the outdoor emergency siren, except in a few hyper-vigilant cities like Baltimore, went nearly silent. Now, a national comeback is under way. Like a has-been rocker, the warning siren - viewed by some as an ear-piercing relic, by others as a reassuring old friend - may be blaring again soon in a city near you. "They're coming back big time," said Ed Wise, a funeral-home director outside of Atlanta who sells, restores and repairs sirens as a sideline.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
On July 29, 2003; CHARLES T. WESTCOTT, 89, former director of Procurement Services, Office of Civil Defense. Interment will be at September 20, 2003 at 11 am in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 19, 2008
Robert Eugene Williams Jr., a retired Baltimore Civil Defense worker, died of cancer Thursday at his Stoneleigh home. He was 81. Mr. Williams was born and raised in Waverly and was a 1944 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. After serving in the Navy near the end of World War II, he went to work for the city water department before enrolling at Washington College. In 1947, he went to work as an engineering officer for the city's Civil Defense Disaster Control Board. He retired in 1990.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2004
It was a big sound in its day - loud, off-key and impossible to dance to - and, with a push from the government, it captured the imagination of a generation. Then it all but disappeared. Faster than you can say "civil defense," the wail of the outdoor emergency siren, except in a few hyper-vigilant cities like Baltimore, went nearly silent. Now, a national comeback is under way. Like a has-been rocker, the warning siren - viewed by some as an ear-piercing relic, by others as a reassuring old friend - may be blaring again soon in a city near you. "They're coming back big time," said Ed Wise, a funeral-home director outside of Atlanta who sells, restores and repairs sirens as a sideline.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 15, 2004
FALLUJAH, Iraq - Heavily armed guerrillas shouting "God is great" launched a brazen assault on Iraqi security compounds yesterday, outgunning Iraqi police, freeing dozens of prisoners and leaving at least 23 dead. Some of the bloodiest street fighting in Iraq during the 10-month occupation claimed the lives of 17 police officers, four attackers and two civilians. The battle spilled into the dense alleys and markets in the heart of this volatile city west of Baghdad and left another 35 people wounded.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 13, 2004
FALLUJAH, Iraq - The commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East dropped in for a visit here yesterday, and Iraqi gunmen were waiting. They were hiding on a rooftop along the main road. When Gen. John Abizaid strode into an Iraqi civil defense station, they fired rocket-propelled grenades at his convoy. They missed the general. American soldiers responded with a storm of gunfire. The gunmen disappeared. In minutes, it was over, and Abizaid was on his way. U.S. officials said they would investigate, but they were skeptical of suggestions that the Iraqi gunmen had advance word of the general's visit.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 8, 2003
BAGHDAD - With July 1 as the target date for Iraqis to take the political helm of their country, Washington is moving swiftly to shift the dangerous and costly burden of security into Iraqis' hands. As another U.S. soldier died in a roadside bombing in Mosul yesterday, the top U.S. general in Iraq outlined the growing effort to shift security "to Iraqi faces," including a decision to triple the size of Iraq's new civil defense forces in coming months. The Iraqi Civil Defense Corps, a paramilitary unit designed to help hunt insurgents and foster communication with citizens, is expected to grow from 12,500 personnel to nearly 40,000 in the next four months, said Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
On July 29, 2003; CHARLES T. WESTCOTT, 89, former director of Procurement Services, Office of Civil Defense. Interment will be at September 20, 2003 at 11 am in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Corinne Schmidt and Corinne Schmidt,Special to The Sun | October 3, 1990
HUANTA, Peru -- Several dozen dark-skinned people sit on the dusty ground of the Castropampa military base. At an army officer's barked command, they rise and stand at attention. But these are not soldiers. They are Indian peasants, members of a local "Civil Defense Committee."Earlier that morning, answering an army summons to appear at the military base in Huanta, they walked 6 miles from the hamlet of Quinrapa. With 5,000 other Huanta peasants, these men, women and children form the backbone of the Peruvian government's controversial civil defense effort, designed to enlist civilian support against the Maoist rebels of the Shining Path movement.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 20, 1991
These being touchy times, Eva Sicca had an immediate reaction to a Civil Defense siren that wailed over East Baltimore for more than a half-hour yesterday."
NEWS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Dan Mihalopoulos,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
PARAMUS, N.J. -- Hoping to avoid feeling helpless if terrorists strike again, 25 suburbanites gather each week in this town about 10 miles from Manhattan to ponder tough questions. What is the best way to drag your neighbors from a collapsed building in the aftermath of a terrorist attack? And what should you do if terrorists release poison gas at the local mall? "War has just started, and God only knows what these wackos will do next," instructor Maria Kosciolek warned students at a recent civil defense class here.
NEWS
By John Makely and John Makely,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 8, 2003
On Aug. 2, 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, catching its neighbor unprepared and quickly occupying the country. The United States entered the conflict in January 1991. And within six weeks, Iraqi troops had withdrawn from Kuwait. The months of occupation were traumatic for Kuwait. Those who could fled, but most lived in fear as Iraqis looted and terrorized the country. Today, 650 Kuwaitis arrested by the Iraqis are still missing. Now, about 250,000 American troops are setting up camp in Kuwait, gearing up for a possible attack on Iraq.
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